Rasmussen College - Minnesota Campuses Course Catalog 2009

Rasmussen's course catalog for its Minnesota colleges.
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MINNESOTA Minnesota Campus Locations • Brooklyn Park • Eagan • Eden Prairie • Lake Elmo / Woodbury • Mankato • St. Cloud Additional Campus Locations: Inside This Catalog Programs of Study Course Descriptions College Policies Administration Faculty & Staff t t t t t • Fort Myers, FL Effective August 11, 2009. This edition replaces previous editions. • Ocala, FL • Pasco County, FL • Aurora, IL • Rockford, IL • Romeoville/Joliet, IL • Moorhead, MN • Bismarck, ND • Fargo, ND • Green Bay, WI • Wausau, WI RASMUSSEN COLLEGE | www.Rasmussen.edu 2 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 MISSION Rasmussen College is dedicated to serving our communities by recognizing the diverse needs of individuals. We encourage personal and professional development through respect, appreciation, and a commitment to general education as a foundation for lifelong learning. As an institution of higher learning, the College is committed to preparing students to be active, productive and successful contributors to a global community. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E PURPOSE To accomplish our mission, Rasmussen College has established these purposes: 1 Educational Excellence: Rasmussen College creates a teaching/ learning community that is challenging, stimulating, and student-focused. This is accomplished through an integrated system of accessible resources, interactive classes, and a rigorous curriculum. 2 Learning Environment: Rasmussen College provides learning opportunities in an environment of mutual respect in an unbiased atmosphere that prepares students for challenging careers and lifelong learning. 3 Professional Development: The institutional culture of Rasmussen College provides and supports ongoing opportunities for professional growth for students and employees, preparing well-rounded individuals who contribute to our global community. 4 Modern Technology: Rasmussen College supports the use of modern technology as a tool to enhance student learning and enrich the classroom environment, as well as empower students to adapt in an ever-changing workforce. The College is committed to student development through the implementation of virtual classrooms utilizing the online learning modality. 5 Service to Communities: Rasmussen College creates and maintains a collaborative community where students, employees, business, industry, professional associations/communities, and other institutions of higher learning benefit from shared knowledge and experience. 6 Assessment and Planning: Rasmussen College students, both residential and online, engage in an active assessment program that evaluates student learning, effective teaching, and institutional progress. The information gathered assists the College as it formulates long and short-range plans, anticipates challenges, and strives to meet the goals of the institution. I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 3 Board of Directors Henry S. Bienen – President, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois Table of Contents Enrollment Procedures ......................................................................4 Calendar ...........................................................................................4 Financial Aid .....................................................................................5 Scholarship and Grant Programs .......................................................6 School of Allied Health .....................................................................7 School of Business ...........................................................................15 School of Education ........................................................................19 School of Justice Studies ..................................................................20 School of Nursing ...........................................................................26 School of Technology and Design....................................................27 Course Descriptions ........................................................................29 Academic Information and College Policies .....................................43 Faculty and Staff..............................................................................54 John A. Canning, Jr. – Chairman and CEO Madison Dearborn Partners, LLC James E. Cowie – Managing Director Frontenac Company Therese A. Fitzpatrick, RN, PhDc – Partner, The Optime Group Stanford J. Goldblatt, Esq. – Partner, Winston & Strawn Bernard Goldstein – Founder, Broadview International Robert E. King – Chairman, Rasmussen College, Inc. – Chairman, Salt Creek Ventures J. Michael Locke – President & CEO Rasmussen College, Inc. Thurston E. Manning – Formerly Executive Director of the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association Jack C. Staley – Former Chairman DePaul University Board of Trustees Kristi A. Waite – President, Rasmussen College R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 4 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 Enrollment Procedures You’ve already taken the first big step by scheduling your campus visit and meeting your admissions representative. Our admissions professionals can now help you explore the various options that best meet your goals, interests, educational needs, and work or activities schedule. Your team will help you find the learning program, location, and coursework that are right for you. When you’ve chosen the option that best meets your needs, you can apply for admission by submitting the following: • Application Form (Apply early for best class choices and scholarship opportunities.) • $60 fee for entire program or $20 per course • An attestation of high school graduation or equivalency • College placement exam results • Required credentials for foreign students, including TOEFL test score of 500 paper-based or 173 computer-based, plus first quarter tuition. • Individuals applying for admission to the Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, or School of Nursing programs must meet program-specific admissions requirements, in addition to all general Rasmussen College admissions requirements. See the admissions policies for these programs under Academic Information and College Policies. • In addition, some programs require applicants to complete a criminal background check. Please see College Acceptance or Rejection of Application for Admission for more details. Rasmussen College will notify you in writing of your acceptance or rejection. All money paid to the College will be refunded if you are not accepted except any non-refundable test fees required for the Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, or School of Nursing programs. All new students will attend an orientation session a week or two before classes start. This required session is an opportunity to learn College policies and course scheduling, and to meet other students. Picking a Start Date 2009-2010 Academic Calendar • 2009 Summer Quarter July 6 – September 20 • 2009 Early Fall Quarter August 10 – September 20 • 2009 Fall Quarter October 5 – December 20 • 2009 Early Winter Quarter November 9 – December 20 • 2010 Winter Quarter January 4 – March 21 • 2010 Early Spring Quarter February 8 – March 21 • 2010 Spring Quarter April 5 – June 20 • 2010 Early Summer Quarter May 10 – June 20 • 2010 Summer Quarter July 6 – September 19 College Holidays • New Year’s Day • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day • Memorial Day • Independence Day • Friday prior to Labor Day (Employee Appreciation Day) • Labor Day • Veterans Day • Thanksgiving Day and the following Friday • Christmas Day R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 5 Primary Sources of Financial Aid and How to Apply. Each campus has a professionally staffed financial aid department designed to help you apply for federal, state, and private assistance. The primary purpose of financial aid is to help students who otherwise would not be able to attend a post-secondary institution meet the cost of higher education. The basic responsibility for financing your education lies with you and your family. Aid is based upon documented financial need — the difference between the cost of college and your ability to pay for it. Costs include books, tuition, supplies, room and board, transportation, living expenses, and child care costs. There are three basic types of aid available to Rasmussen students: • Various state and federal student loan programs. • Gift Aid, also known as grants, is assistance you do not have to pay back and is usually based upon financial need. • Employment through work study programs may provide relevant work experience and decrease the necessity of borrowing student loans for living expenses Tuition Rates Please see the Tuition Structure section under Academic Information and College Policies for complete information on tuition rates. Federal Loan Programs Program Type of Award Amount Per Year Application Gift Aid Federal Pell Grant Program Grant based on financial need. $609 - $5350 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Free Application for Federal Student Aid MN State Grant Grant based on financial need and the student’s individual tuition and fees. Must be an undergraduate student with MN residency. Student is notified by the College regarding eligibility. Grant based on financial need awarded by the institution. Notification is made by the College regarding eligibility. Award based on Pell Grant eligibility and academic rigor requirements of state high school coursework eligibility. Part-time jobs on campus or at local non-profit agencies. Based on financial need and skill level for positions available. Same as State Work Study. Amounts calculated based on length of degree and current state legislative provisions $100 - $4,000, based on availability Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) Free Application for Federal Student Aid – Awarded by the College Free Application for Federal Student Aid $750 for first year; $1300 for second year Employment MN State Work Study Varies Free Application for Federal Student Aid – Awarded by the College Free Application for Federal Student Aid – Awarded by the College Free Application for Federal Student Aid and Promissory Note processed through College and Lender Free Application for Federal Student Aid and Promissory Note processed through College and Lender Federal Work Study Varies Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan Program Payment deferred until six months after student leaves college or attends less than half time. Need-based calculation. 1st Year - $3,500 2nd Year - $4,500 3rd Year+ - $5,500 Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program Principal and interest may be deferred until after student leaves college or attends less than half-time. Same as subsidized limits with additional $2,000 for Dependent. Independent: 1st & 2nd Year $6000 3rd Year & above $7000. Up to college cost of attendance. Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) For credit-worthy parents of dependent undergraduates. PLUS application and Promissory Note processed through College and Lender SELF application processed though College and the Higher Education Services Office Veterans Administration or Veterans Service Officer Minnesota State Loan Programs Veterans’ Benefits Student Educational Loan Fund (SELF) Supplemental, variable interest rate loan, allows deferment of principal while in college, requires credit-worthy co-signer. Veterans and dependents of veterans, including Guard and Reserve Component. $7,500 per grade level Veterans’ Benefits Monthly benefit based on service contributions R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 6 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 Scholarship and Grant Programs Rasmussen College offers the following institutional scholarship and grant programs. Some campuses have additional scholarships available; please contact your Financial Aid Office for more information. Grade Point Achievement Scholarships If you are like most students, you don’t have a pile of cash lying around to pay for college. So you’ll be glad to know that based on your high school cumulative GPA, Rasmussen College offers scholarship opportunities of up to $10,000 for incoming first-year students. Below is a quick look at the available Grade Point Achievement scholarships. Ask your Admissions Representative for all the details and an application form. Grade point average is based upon a 4.0 scale. Other grade point scales will be converted to a 4.0 scale to determine award. Eligibility guidelines for the Grade Point Achievement Scholarships are as follows: • Eligible students must be current-year graduating high school seniors. • Students must apply for and begin classes during the summer quarter, early fall quarter or fall quarter immediately following their graduation from high school. • Award amounts are determined upon receipt of the student’s official final transcript from high school. • All recipients will be notified of the award in writing and all funds are paid directly to the College. Award amounts for Associate Degree students are divided equally among the student’s first 5 quarters of attendance. Award amounts for Bachelor Degree students are divided equally among the student’s first 10 quarters of attendance. • Student must carry a minimum of 9 credits per full quarter or 7 for a mid-start term, maintain satisfactory academic progress, and not be on Academic Warning/ Probation, or the award is forfeited from that point forward. • Awards are forfeited if attendance is discontinued or interrupted for Associate Degree seeking students. Bachelor’s Degree seeking students may interrupt attendance a maximum of 2 instances, with each instance no more than one quarter and not more than once in any one calendar year. Early Start Program Rasmussen College is proud to offer select high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to begin their professional career training early. The Early Start Program is designed to reward those who have a strong academic background and a desire to succeed. 10% Military Discount All current and retired military personnel, as well as veterans, enrolling in a Degree, Diploma, or Certificate program are eligible for a 10% tuition discount. In order to qualify for the discount, all admission requirements must be completed, and applicants must provide proof of service by submitting an actual or faxed copy of their military ID card, including expiration date. Retired military personnel must provide valid military retiree ID or DD 214 form. In addition, the College will extend the 10% discount to the spouse and dependents, age 18-21, of any service member on active duty as outlined above. These individuals must provide an actual or faxed copy of their dependent military ID card, which includes an expiration date. Corporate Discount Some companies receive a tuition discount from Rasmussen College for eligible employees. Contact your campus for details. If your cumulative Grade Point Average upon graduation is between: 2.00 – 2.74 2.75 – 2.99 3.00 – 3.24 3.25 – 3.49 3.50 – 3.74 3.75 – 3.99 4.00 You will receive the following Scholarship: If you apply for admission prior to January 30, your award is: Associates $1,000 Bachelors $2,000 Associates $1,500 Bachelors $3,000 Associates $2,000 Bachelors $4,000 Associates $2,500 Bachelors $5,000 Associates $3,000 Bachelors $6,000 Associates $4,000 Bachelors $8,000 Associates $5,000 Bachelors $10,000 If you apply for admission between January 30, and April 30, your award is: $600 $1,200 $1,000 $2,000 $1,500 $3,000 $2,000 $4,000 $2,500 $5,000 $3,000 $6,000 $4,000 $8,000 Success Award Achievement Award Silver Circle Award Gold Circle Award Platinum Circle Award Director’s Award President’s Award On-Time Graduation Scholarship and Accelerated Graduation Scholarship Rasmussen College is committed to helping students get their degree and start their new careers. To help our students reach that goal faster, Rasmussen offers two scholarships to students to help make on-time graduation a reality. Students who take thirteen (13) or more credits a quarter will receive a $500 Accelerated Graduation Scholarship each quarter. Additional, students who take nine (9) to twelve (12) credits per quarter will receive a $300 On-Time Graduation Scholarship each quarter. Students who start in February, May, August, or November and take seven (7) or eight (8) credits will receive a $200 On-Time Graduation Scholarship their first quarter.. Restrictions Students are eligible for only one of the following scholarship and grant programs at a time: • Grade Point Achievement Scholarship • Early Start Program • 10% Military Discount • Corporate Discount Students may combine any of these scholarships with the On-Time Graduation Scholarship and/or the Accelerated Graduation Scholarship. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 7 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this degree program know the concepts and skills necessary to find entry-level employment in the fitness industry. They have a basic understanding of anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology, and their relationship to exercise. They also know the relationship of nutrition to health and fitness. Graduates can perform health and fitness assessments and develop training regimens for people with a variety of health and fitness needs. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and the well-being of their clients. eXeRciSe ScieNce AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 7 Quarters Full-Time • 10 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Personal Trainer • Fitness Instructor Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Required course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 B136 D111 E242 ES100 ES110 ES200 ES220 ES230 ES240 ES280 M120 MA135 MA241 MA242 MT245 MT246 PN105 B233 ES205 ES225 ES245 ES250 Introduction to Business Computer Information Systems Career Development Introduction to Exercise Science Fitness Theory and Assessment Exercise Physiology Resistance Training Techniques Event Training Techniques Exercise for Special Populations Exercise Science Capstone Medical Terminology Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professional Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Kinesiology Kinesiology II Nutrition and Diet Therapy Principles of Management Nutrition for Exercise Science Musculoskeletal Injuries Exercise and Aging Worksite Health Promotion Total Degree Credits 4 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 98* Electives (Choose Two, for a minimum of 6 credits) * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. This program is only available at the Eagan campus. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 8 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this degree program understand the healthcare system and how to communicate with the healthcare team. They know basic human anatomy, medical terminology, and pathology, as well as techniques for health information management and quality improvement. Graduates can perform medical coding and billing, analyze data, use and understand scanning technology, navigate an electronic health record, manage a file room, and release medical information under appropriate circumstances. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, ethical and professional behavior in the workplace, and the confidentiality of patient information. HeALtH iNFORMAtiON tecHNiciAN AAS DEgrEE** Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Health Information Technician • Medical Data Analyst • Medical Coder • Health Information Workflow Specialist • Medical Records Coordinator • Coding Analyst • Electronic Health Record Specialist Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E150 E242 G150 M120 M140 M140A M141 M208 M209 M211 M218 M223 M224 M229 M230 M251 M252 Computer Information Systems 3 Success Strategies 4 Career Development 2 Structure and Function of the Human Body 4 Medical Terminology 4 Basic ICD-9-CM Coding 4 Intermediate ICD-9-CM Coding 3 Ambulatory Care Coding 3 Introduction to Health Information Management 4 Medical Insurance and Billing 3 Quality Analysis and Management 4 Management of Health Information Services 4 Pathology I 4 Pathology II 4 Healthcare Information Technologies 4 Medical Law and Ethics 4 Medical Coding Practicum 1 Health Information Practicum 2 Total Degree Credits 93* This Degree Program is also offered online. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. ** The Health Information Technician associate’s degree offered at the Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Eden Prairie, Lake Elmo, Mankato, Rockford, and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). The Health Information Technician associate’s degree offered at the Green Bay campus is in Candidacy Status for accreditation by the Commission on Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 9 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program know basic concepts in kinesiology, human anatomy, pathology, and the theory behind massage-therapy techniques. They can perform a variety of massage techniques, including Swedish massage, sports massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, and additional techniques. In addition, they can choose and perform techniques for clients with individualized needs. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, professionalism and ethical behavior, and the appreciation of other massage therapists in the industry. This program prepares graduates to take the National Certification Exam from the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). MASSAGe tHeRAPY AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 7 Quarters Full-Time • 11 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Private Practice • Spas and Resorts • Health Clubs • Wellness Centers • Clinics • Chiropractic Offices Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Required course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 B136 E242 M230 MA241 MA242 MT101 MT105 MT120 MT140 MT215 MT220 MT225 MT230 MT237 MT238 MT245 MT246 MT250 Introduction to Business Career Development Medical Law and Ethics Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Introduction to Massage Therapy Deep Tissue Massage Techniques for Special Clients Pathology for Massage Therapy Sports Massage Myofascial Release Alternative Modalities Trigger Point Therapy Clinic I Clinic II Kinesiology Kinesiology II Business and Wellness Total Degree Credits 4 2 4 5 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 4 4 4 3 94* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. This program is only available at the Eden Prairie, Mankato, and St. Cloud campuses. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. OFFice MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Medical • See School of Business on Page 18 R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 10 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program understand the procedures of medical offices in a variety of healthcare settings. They know medical terminology, anatomy, pathology, and basic concepts of health-information management. Graduates can perform medical coding, transcription, and billing, and general medical office procedures. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, ethical and professional behavior in the workplace, and the confidentiality of patient information. MedicAL AdMiNiStRAtiON AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Medical Office Assistant • Medical Business Office Clerk • Medical Receptionist • Medical Transcriptionist • Medical Office Manager • Medical Coder/Biller Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E150 E242 G150 M120 M140 M140A M141 M200 M205 M206 M209 M223 M224 M230 M251 M290 S115 S120 Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Structure and Function of the Human Body Medical Terminology Basic ICD-9-CM Coding Intermediate ICD-9-CM Coding Ambulatory Care Coding Medical Office Procedures Medical Transcription I Medical Transcription II Medical Insurance and Billing Pathology I Pathology II Medical Law and Ethics Medical Coding Practicum Medical Administration Capstone Keyboarding I Word for Windows Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 4 2 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 1 3 3 92* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 11 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program know medical terminology, anatomy, pathology, and basic concepts of pharmacology and psychology. They can measure vital signs, administer injections, perform venipuncture, and perform CLIA-waived laboratory tests. They can also perform general medicaloffice procedures and medical billing. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and medical ethics. The completion of this program helps prepare the student to seek national certification as a medical assistant. MedicAL ASSiStiNG AAS DEgrEE** Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Medical Assistant • Medical Office Administrative Assistant Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Required course) G141 Introduction to Communication Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Required course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E242 G137 M120 M200 M223 M224 M230 MA110 MA135 MA145 MA225 MA230 MA241 MA242 Computer Information Systems 3 Career Development 2 Introduction to Psychology 4 Medical Terminology 4 Medical Office Procedures 4 Pathology I 4 Pathology II 4 Medical Law and Ethics 4 Clinical Skills I 4 Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professional 4 Clinical Skills II 4 Laboratory Skills for Medical Assisting 4 Medical Assistant Externship 6 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Total Degree Credits 93* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. ** Medical Assisting students must receive the complete series of hepatitis B vaccinations before they will be eligible to begin their externship. In addition to fulfilling Rasmussen College’s general graduation requirements, Medical Assisting students must successfully complete all 61 Medical Assisting competencies and receive CPR and first-aid certification before they will be eligible to graduate. The Medical Assisting program at the Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Eden Prairie, Mankato, and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 12 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program know medical terminology, anatomy, and safety standards and practices. They can operate and maintain equipment in the medical laboratory, collect and analyze specimen samples for diagnosis, and assist members of the healthcare team in delivering service to patients. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, the safety and confidentiality of patients and other technicians in the laboratory, and ethical and professional behavior. Students do not have to pass any external certifications or licensure examinations to receive the AAS degree. MedicAL LAbORAtORY tecHNiciAN AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 8 Quarters Full-Time Career Opportunities • Medical Laboratory Technician General Education Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Required course) G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Required course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E242 M120 MA241 MA242 ML100 ML150 ML151 ML152 ML153 ML201 ML202 ML203 ML205 ML206 ML291 ML292 PB105 Computer Information Systems Career Development Medical Terminology Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science Clinical Chemistry I Hematology I Urinalysis Clinical Microbiology I Clinical Chemistry II Hematology II Immunology Immunohematology Clinical Microbiology II Clinical Practicum I Clinical Practicum II Phlebotomy Total Degree Credits 3 2 4 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 12 12 3 111 Applicants to this program must meet programspecific admissions requirements, in addition to all general Rasmussen College admissions requirements. Please see the application procedures for this program under Academic Information and College Policies. Objective Graduates of this program know medical language and terminology and the applications of available software packages. They can transcribe a variety of medical documents, use different medical report formats, and employ transcription equipment effectively. They can also support and communicate effectively with the healthcare team. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, ethical and professional behavior, and the confidentiality of patient information. MedicAL tRANScRiPtiONiSt AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Medical Transcriptionist • Transcription Supervisor • Medical Document Editor Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 B271 D111 E150 E242 G150 M120 M200 M205 M206 M207 M223 M224 M230 M280 S115 S116 S120 Professional Communication Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Structure and Function of the Human Body Medical Terminology Medical Office Procedures Medical Transcription I Medical Transcription II Medical Transcription III Pathology I Pathology II Medical Law and Ethics Medical Transcription Capstone Keyboarding I Keyboarding II Word for Windows Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 3 4 2 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 90* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 13 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program know medical terminology, medical law and ethics, and pharmacy math. They understand the theory of pharmacy practice. Graduates can receive, interpret, input, and fill prescriptions, and can use software programs to complete these tasks. They can perform pharmacy tasks in retail and hospital pharmacy settings. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, honesty and integrity, compassion for patients, and patient confidentiality. PHARMAcY tecHNiciAN AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Retail Pharmacy • Clinic Pharmacy • Hospitals and Health Care Facilities Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Required course) G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 B119 B271 D111 E150 E242 G150 M120 M223 M224 M230 MA135 PT105 PT120 PT125 PT240 PT280 S115 Customer Service 4 Professional Communication 4 Computer Information Systems 3 Success Strategies 4 Career Development 2 Structure and Function of the Human Body 4 Medical Terminology 4 Pathology I 4 Pathology II 4 Medical Law and Ethics 4 Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professional 4 Introduction to Pharmacy 4 Pharmacy Math and Dosages 4 Pharmacy Software / Automation / Insurance Billing 3 Unit Dose and Medication Preparation 3 Pharmacy Technician Capstone 2 Keyboarding I 3 Total Degree Credits 92* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. Objective Graduates of this program know basic concepts of anatomy and physiology, pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology. They understand OR design, surgical equipment and instrumentation, safety standards, and asepsis and sterile techniques. Graduates can prepare, clean, and restock operating rooms, use and maintain surgical equipment, perform scrub and circulator duties in a number of surgical specialties, and contribute to pre- and post-operative patient care. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and patient safety and care. SuRGicAL tecHNOLOGiSt AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 7 Quarters Full-Time Career Opportunities • Hospitals • Medical Clinics • Operating Rooms • Physician Offices General Education Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Required course) G215 Introduction to Human Biology Social Sciences (Select 1 course) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E242 G124 G137 M120 M223 M224 MA135 MA241 MA242 ST102 ST105 ST112 ST203 ST207 ST215 ST220 Computer Information Systems Career Development English Composition Introduction to Psychology Medical Terminology Pathology I Pathology II Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professional Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Microbiology for Surgical Technologists Introduction to Surgical Technology Surgical Procedures I Surgical Procedures II Surgical Procedures III Surgical Tech Practicum I Surgical Tech Practicum II Total Degree Credits 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 4 4 4 8 8 97 Applicants to this program must meet programspecific admissions requirements, in addition to all general Rasmussen College admissions requirements. Please see the application procedures for this program under Academic Information and College Policies. The Surgical Technologist AAS program offered at the Brooklyn Park and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Graduates of these programs are eligible to sit for the Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) examination. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 14 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF AlliED HEAlTH Objective Graduates of this program know basic concepts in kinesiology, human anatomy, pathology, and the theory behind massage-therapy techniques. They can perform a variety of massage techniques, including Swedish massage, sports massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, and additional techniques. In addition, they can choose and perform techniques for clients with individualized needs. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, professionalism and ethical behavior, and the appreciation of other massage therapists in the industry. This program prepares graduates to take the National Certification Exam from the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). MASSAGe tHeRAPY DiPLoMA Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Private Practice • Spas and Resorts • Health Clubs • Chiropractic Offices • Clinics • Wellness Centers Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. E242 G124 G141 G215 G233 M230 MA241 MA242 MT101 MT105 MT120 MT140 MT215 MT220 MT225 MT230 MT237 MT238 MT245 MT246 MT250 Career Development English Composition Introduction to Communication Introduction to Human Biology College Algebra Medical Law and Ethics Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Introduction to Massage Therapy Deep Tissue Massage Techniques for Special Clients Pathology for Massage Therapy Sports Massage Myofascial Release Alternative Modalities Trigger Point Therapy Clinic I Clinic II Kinesiology Kinesiology II Business and Wellness Total Diploma Credits 2 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 4 4 4 3 74* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. This program is only available at the Eden Prairie, Mankato, and St. Cloud campuses. Objective Graduates of this program know medical language and terminology and the applications of available software packages. They can transcribe a variety of medical documents, use different medical report formats, and employ transcription equipment effectively. They can also support and communicate effectively with the healthcare team. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, ethical and professional behavior, and the confidentiality of patient information. MedicAL tRANScRiPtiONiSt DiPLoMA Standard Length of Program • 4 Quarters Full-Time • 6 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Medical Transcriptionist • Medical Document Editor Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. D111 E150 E242 G124 G141 G150 G233 M120 M200 M205 M206 M207 M223 M224 M280 S115 S116 S120 Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development English Composition Introduction to Communication Structure and Function of the Human Body College Algebra Medical Terminology Medical Office Procedures Medical Transcription I Medical Transcription II Medical Transcription III Pathology I Pathology II Medical Transcription Capstone Keyboarding I Keyboarding II Word for Windows Total Diploma Credits 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 62* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 15 SCHool oF BuSiNESS Objective Graduates of this program know concepts in management, human resources, marketing, and business ethics. They understand finance and accounting, and advanced management theories and techniques in a variety of fields. They can apply, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate facts and theories; locate, evaluate, and integrate appropriate primary and secondary sources; integrate their ideas with the ideas of others to create new knowledge; recognize and address complex ethical situations; communicate effectively in a variety of scenarios; and operate effectively within a continually changing environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, leadership, integrity, and lifelong learning. buSiNeSS MANAGeMeNt BS DEgrEE Business Management • Internet Marketing Standard Length of Program • 12 Quarters Full-Time • 15 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Sales Worker Supervisor • Human Resource Manager • Marketing Manager • Internet Marketing Manager • E-Retail Manager • Director • Operations Manager Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Lower Division Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Lower Division Number Course Credits Accelerated Bachelor’s Degree Rasmussen’s Accelerated Bachelor’s in Business Management is designed for business professionals who want to complete their Business Management Bachelor’s degree with other people working in the field. The program offers a flexible schedule to allow you to complete the degree while on the job. You can: • Network and learn from other business professionals • Participate in courses that blend online and on-campus instruction • Experience accelerated courses that allow you to immerse yourself in the subject matter and develop a deeper understanding of the course concepts • Take advantage of evening or weekend classes and an accelerated schedule depending on the campus This program is available at Mankato and St. Cloud. For more information, please contact your campus. English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (1 required**; select 1 course) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics** G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World Number 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Credits A151 A152 B136 B230 B232 B233 B271 D111 D187 E150 E242 Number Accounting I Accounting II Introduction to Business Principles of Finance Principles of Marketing Principles of Management Professional Communication Computer Information Systems Professional Presentations Success Strategies Career Development Course 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 2 Credits Upper Division B350 B351 B360 B370 B371 B404 B420 B440 B441 B460 B490 B492 B498 Microeconomics for Business Management of Information Systems Operations Management Organizational Behavior Analysis Research and Report Writing Negotiation and Conflict Management Organizational Development Managing a Diverse Workforce Personnel and Labor Relations Strategic Management Business, Society, and Ethics Contemporary Leadership Challenges Management Capstone Total lower division major/core credits Total upper division major/core credits business Management Specialization Number Course 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 40 51 Credits Upper Division Course B165 B234 B250 B293 A310 B333 B352 Introduction to Human Resource Management Business Law Training and Development Business Ethics Managerial Accounting Principles of Management II International Business Unrestricted elective credits Total lower-division emphasis credits Total upper-division emphasis credits Total Degree Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 13 16 12 180* Communication (Select 1 course) G324 Advanced Composition G332 Visual Communication in the Media Humanities (Select 1 course) G330 American Literature G335 Contemporary World Literature: 1900 to the Present G435 Literature of American Minorities Math/Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G328 Human Uses of the Environment G434 Gender in Math and Science Social Sciences (Select 1 course) G333 American Religious History G380 Visions of America Since 1945 G401 Comparative Politics Total lower division general education credits Total upper division general education credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 16 internet Marketing Specialization Number Course Credits B218 B223 B224 B228 B229 B231 B340 B341 B342 E-Commerce Internet Consumer Behavior Marketing Ethics Search Engine Marketing Target/Audience Messaging Web Media Marketing Applied Internet Marketing E-Strategies and Development Audience and Application Unrestricted elective credits Total lower-division emphasis credits Total upper-division emphasis credits Total Degree Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 24 12 180* ** Principles of Economics is required. Students must select an additional course from the Social Sciences category to meet the required amount of general education credits in that category. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 16 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF BuSiNESS Objective Graduates of this degree program learn to manage accounts receivable and accounts payable. They learn to prepare tax returns and financial statements, and use computer applications proficiently. They know financial and managerial accounting concepts as related to the business environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and the ability to relate accounting concepts to the world around them. AccOuNtiNG AAS DEgrEE Banking • Financial Accounting • Financial Investigation Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Accounting Clerk • Financial Planner • Auditor • Bookkeeper • Loan Officer • Financial Analyst • Bank Teller • Accounts Management Trainee Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (1 required**; select 1 course) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics** G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World ** Principles of Economics is required for the Accounting AAS degree. Students must select an additional course from the Social Sciences category to meet the required amount of general education credits in that category. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 A151 A152 A153 A269 A280 B136 B271 D111 D181 D279 E150 E242 Accounting I Accounting II Accounting III Income Tax Accounting Capstone Introduction to Business Professional Communication Computer Information Systems Excel Computer Focused Principles Success Strategies Career Development 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 3 3 3 4 2 banking Specialization Number Course Credits B232 F111 F212 F213 F215 Principles of Marketing Introduction to Banking Fundamentals of Consumer Lending Introduction to Mortgage Lending Principles of Banking Law Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered Online. 4 4 4 4 4 93* Financial Accounting Specialization Number Course Credits A177 A272 A274 B234 B293 Payroll Accounting Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Business Law Business Ethics Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered Online. 4 4 4 4 4 93* Financial investigation Specialization Number Course Credits A272 A274 A276 J100 J125 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Financial Investigation Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal Law and Procedures Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered Online. 4 4 4 4 4 93* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 17 SCHool oF BuSiNESS Objective Graduates of this degree program know major concepts in accounting, business, business ethics, business law, and finance. They can demonstrate management skills including planning and decision making, organizing, controlling, and leading employees. They can interpret basic financial data and perform basic accounting skills. They can use computer applications for the business environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and lifelong learning. buSiNeSS MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Business Administration • Call Center Management • Child Development Entrepreneurship • Human Resource • Internet Marketing • Marketing and Sales Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Retail Management • Small Business Manager • Customer Service • Call Center/Telecommunications Manager • Child Care Administrator • Human Resource Assistant • Benefits Administrator • Sales Representative • Internet Sales & Marketing Associate • E-Marketing Coordinator/Web Analyst • Marketing Assistant Foundation Courses Number Course Credits child development Specialization Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 CC151A CC152 CC153A CC258A CC259 CC260A CC261A Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (1 required,** select 1 course) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics** G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World Foundations of Child Development 4 Early Childhood Education Curriculum and Instruction 4 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 4 Infant and Toddler Development 4 Dynamics of the Family 4 The Exceptional Child 4 Emerging Literacy Through Children’s Literature 4 Total Degree Credits 95* This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Credits Number entrepreneurship Specialization Course Credits B146 B240 B243 B244 B247 B293 Introduction to Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurial Product and Service Planning Entrepreneurial Marketing Entrepreneurial Finance: Capitalization for the Entrepreneur Entrepreneurial Internship Business Ethics Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is only offered online. 4 4 4 4 4 4 91* Human Resource Specialization Number Course Credits B119 B165 B249 B250 B267 B268 B293 Customer Service 4 Introduction to Human Resource Management 4 Risk Management and Insurance 4 Training and Development 4 Employment Law 4 Compensation and Benefits Management 4 Business Ethics 4 Total Degree Credits 95* This Degree Program is only offered online. Major and Core Courses Number Course internet Marketing Specialization Number Course Credits A151 B136 B230 B233 B234 B271 B280 D111 E150 E242 Number Accounting I Introduction to Business Principles of Finance Principles of Management Business Law Professional Communication Business Capstone Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Course 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 4 2 Credits B218 B223 B224 B228 B229 B231 E-Commerce Internet Consumer Behavior Marketing Ethics Search Engine Marketing Target/Audience Messaging Web Media Marketing Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is only offered online. 4 4 4 4 4 4 91* business Administration Specialization A152 A177 B119 B165 B293 D181 D279 Accounting II 4 Payroll Accounting 4 Customer Service 4 Introduction to Human Resource Management 4 Business Ethics 4 Excel 3 Computer Focused Principles 3 Total Degree Credits 93* This Degree Program is also offered online. Marketing and Sales Specialization Number Course Credits B119 B140 B218 B224 B232 B263 R200 Customer Service Sales Techniques E-Commerce Marketing Ethics Principles of Marketing Principles of Advertising Principles of Retailing Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 95* call center Management Specialization Number Course Credits * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. ** Principles of Economics is required. Students must select an additional course from the Social Sciences category to meet the required amount of general education credits in that category. B242 B270 B272 B275 B276 B278 B293 Multicultural Communications for Business 4 Introduction to Global Business 4 Call Center Strategic Leadership 4 Call Center Customer Service Representative Skills 4 Call Center Labor Force Management 4 Call Center Operations Management 4 Business Ethics 4 Total Degree Credits 95* This Degree Program is only offered online. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 18 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF BuSiNESS Objective Graduates of this program know basic office procedures, customer service, and accounting. They can use word-processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software, prepare a variety of business documents, and perform tasks specific to a particular office environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, ethics, and lifelong learning. OFFice MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Corporate Management • Government • Legal/Criminal Justice Medical • Small Business Management Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Office Manager • Executive Assistant • Legal Office Administrator • Medical Office Administrator • Court Clerk • Administrative Assistant Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course**) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body** G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses**) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government** G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 A151 B119 B271 D111 D181 D187 E150 E242 S115 S116 S120 Number Accounting I Customer Service Professional Communication Computer Information Systems Excel Professional Presentations Success Strategies Career Development Keyboarding I Keyboarding II Word for Windows Course 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 Credits corporate Management Specialization B136 B165 B220 B233 D283 S201 Introduction to Business 4 Introduction to Human Resource Management 4 Project Planning and Documentation 4 Principles of Management 4 Access 3 Office Procedures 4 Total Degree Credits 91* This Degree Program is also offered online. Government Specialization** Number Course Credits B180 D283 G243 LA125 LA130 S150 S219 Meeting Management Access Contemporary U.S. Government** Law I State and Local Government Legal Office Procedures Legal Document Processing and Transcription Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 94* ** Structure and Function of the Human Body is required for the Medical specialization, and Contemporary U.S. Government is required for the Government specialization. Medical specialization students must complete one additional Natural Science course, and Government students must complete two additional Social Sciences courses, to fulfill the general education requirements for those respective categories. Legal/criminal justice Specialization Number Course Credits D283 J100 LA125 LA225 S150 S172 S219 Access Introduction to Criminal Justice Law I Law II Legal Office Procedures Legal Terminology Legal Document Processing and Transcription Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 94* Medical Specialization** Number Course Credits G150 M120 M200 M205 M209 M223 M230 Structure and Function of the Human Body** Medical Terminology Medical Office Procedures Medical Transcription I Medical Insurance and Billing Pathology I Medical Law and Ethics Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 94* Small business Management Specialization Number Course Credits A152 A177 B180 B233 D279 D283 S201 Accounting II Payroll Accounting Meeting Management Principles of Management Computer Focused Principles Access Office Procedures Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 94* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 19 SCHool oF EDuCATioN Objective Graduates of this program know management and supervisory skills in the early childhood field, and the rules that govern early childhood centers. They understand developmentally appropriate practices, and techniques for behavior guidance and classroom management. They can plan and implement curriculum, and establish and maintain a safe environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, professionalism in the workplace, and lifelong learning. eARLY cHiLdHOOd educAtiON AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Early Childhood Instructor • Child Care Administrator • Early Childhood Paraprofessional • Child Care Center Director Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math CC151A CC152 CC153A CC154A CC155 CC156 CC258A CC259 CC260A CC261A D111 E150 E242 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Foundations of Child Development 4 Early Childhood Education Curriculum and Instruction 4 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 4 Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Classroom 8 Creating a Learning Environment 10 Implementing Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 10 Infant and Toddler Development 4 Dynamics of the Family 4 The Exceptional Child 4 Emerging Literacy through Children’s Literature 4 Computer Information Systems 3 Success Strategies 4 Career Development 2 Total Degree Credits 97* This Degree Program is also offered online. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. Objective Graduates of this program know developmentally appropriate practices, techniques for behavior guidance and classroom management, and the rules that govern early childhood centers. They can plan and implement curriculum, and establish and maintain a safe environment. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, professionalism in the workplace, and lifelong learning. eARLY cHiLdHOOd educAtiON CErTifiCATE Standard Length of Program • 3 Quarters Full-Time • 3 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Early Childhood Instructor • Infant/Toddler Instructor • Preschool Assistant • Nanny • Child Care Administrator • Lead Teacher Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math CC151A CC152 CC153A CC154A CC155 CC156 E150 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. Foundations of Child Development Early Childhood Education Curriculum and Instruction Health, Safety, and Nutrition Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Classroom Creating a Learning Environment Implementing Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom Success Strategies Total Certificate Credits 4 4 4 8 10 10 4 44* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. buSiNeSS MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Child Development • See School of Business on Page 17 R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 20 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know the history and development of the criminal-justice system and its effect on society. They understand how the legal process works from law enforcement, to the courts, and through the corrections system. They can apply critical thinking to issues in criminal justice such as law enforcement, corrections, security, juvenile justice, and domestic violence. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity in the criminal justice system. cRiMiNAL juStice AAS DEgrEE Corrections • Crime Scene Evidence • Homeland Security • Law Enforcement Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Corrections Officer • Probation Support Specialist • Court Clerk • Security Professional • Juvenile Specialist • Homeland Security • Peace Officer • Law Enforcement Foundation Courses Number Course Credits corrections Specialization 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math J116 J211 J212 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. Case Management Counseling Clients Legal Principles in Corrections Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 93* General Education Courses Number Course Credits crime Scene evidence Specialization Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (2 required courses) G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 J160 J260 J261 Introduction to Forensic Science Introduction to Investigations Crime Scene Analysis Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 93* Homeland Security Specialization Number Course Credits J130 J230 J245 Introduction to Homeland Security Terrorism Security Challenges Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 93* Law enforcement Specialization** Number Course Credits J122 J222 J226 Crime Scene to Conviction: Critical Skills in Documentation Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement Legal Code for Law Enforcement Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 4 4 93* Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits D111 E150 E242 J100 J102 J115 J120 J125 J200 J205 J250 J255 J280 Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminology Introduction to Corrections Policing in America Criminal Law and Procedures Domestic Violence Juvenile Justice Drugs and Crime Ethics in Criminal Justice Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Capstone 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. Criminal Justice Professional Peace Officer Education (PPOE) ** Students seeking licensing as professional peace officers must take the Law Enforcement specialization. In order to sit for the licensing exam, students are also required to successfully complete an officially recognized first-aid course in First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, or Emergency Response, and to complete skills training. Students must provide the Rasmussen College Law Enforcement POST Coordinator with a copy of their required first-aid certification (e.g., a photocopy of their first-responder card) for inclusion in each student’s POST file maintained at Rasmussen College. Some skills training providers may require additional academic coursework. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 21 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know basic concepts of psychology, sociology, counseling, crisis intervention, case management, community and service networking, assessment, and documentation. They understand how human services work from an individual, organizational, and community perspective. They can apply critical thinking to issues in human services such as education, training and self development, facilitation of services, advocacy, organizational participation, and community living skills and supports. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and providing services to individuals or groups with varying needs. HuMAN SeRviceS AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Community Service Specialist • Social Service Specialist • Human Service Assistant • Program Assistant Specialist Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (2 required courses) G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 B119 D111 E150 E242 HS100 HS110 HS115 HS250 HS260 HS280 HS290 J116 J205 J211 Customer Service 4 Computer Information Systems 3 Success Strategies 4 Career Development 2 Introduction to Human Services 4 Cultural Diversity in Human Services 4 Introductory Strategies to Crisis Intervention 4 Organization and Leadership in Human Services 4 Community Psychology 4 Abnormal Psychology 4 Human Services Internship 9 Case Management 4 Juvenile Justice 4 Counseling Clients 4 Total Degree Credits 90* This Degree Program is also offered online. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 22 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know the history and development of the criminal justice system and the role of law enforcement in the system. They understand the legal process from arrest, to the courts, and through the corrections system. They understand the policy and practice of traffic enforcement, firearms use, defensive tactics, investigations, and pursuit driving, and can perform skills in each area. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity in the criminal justice system. Graduates will be eligible to take the Minnesota Professional Peace Officer (POST) licensing exam. LAW eNFORceMeNt AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Police Officer • Deputy Sheriff • Law Enforcement Officer • State Trooper • Conservation Officer Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. D111 E150 E242 J100 J120 J122 J125 J200 J205 J222 J255 LE200 LE211 LE212 LE221 LE222 LE230 LE240 LE245 LE280 LE290 General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (2 required courses) G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Introduction to Criminal Justice Policing in America Crime Scene to Conviction: Critical Skills in Documentation Criminal Law and Procedures Domestic Violence Juvenile Justice Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement Ethics for Criminal Justice Traffic Enforcement Firearms I Firearms II Defensive Tactics I Defensive Tactics II Police Investigation Process Minnesota Traffic Code Minnesota Criminal Code Patrol Practicals with Pursuit Driving Law Enforcement Capstone Total Degree Credits 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 4 2 97* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. Program-specific Law Enforcement (LE) coursework is available only at the Eagan, MN campus. In order to sit for the Peace Officer licensing exam, students are also required to successfully complete an officially recognized first-aid course in First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, or Emergency Response. Students must provide the Rasmussen College Law Enforcement POST Coordinator with a copy of their required first-aid certification (e.g., a photocopy of their first-responder card) for inclusion in each student’s POST file maintained at Rasmussen College. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 23 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know the principles of legal research and writing. They understand criminal, family, corporate, and real-estate law. They can provide services in all areas of the legal system, such as courts, law firms, and government agencies, under the supervision of an attorney. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity. Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. PARALeGAL AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Paralegal • Legal Assistant • Legal Secretary Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (2 required courses) G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 D111 E150 E242 PL100 PL110 PL121 PL122 PL140 PL211 PL212 PL215 PL216 PL219 PL225 PL230 PL290 Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development Introduction to Law and the Legal System Introduction to Legal Research Civil Litigation and Procedure I Civil Litigation and Procedure II Contracts Legal Research and Writing I Legal Research and Writing II Real Estate Law Corporate Law Law Office Technology Torts Family Law Paralegal Internship Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 94* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. Rasmussen College’s Eagan campus location has been approved by the National Association of Legal Assistants (NALA) as a testing center for the Certified Legal Assistant/ Certified Paralegal (CLA/CP) examination. In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 24 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know the history and development of the criminal justice system, and the role of law enforcement in the system. They understand the legal process from arrest, to the courts, and through the corrections system. They can apply critical thinking to issues including policing, criminal law and procedure, documentation, and legal code for law enforcement. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity in the criminal justice system. Upon completing this program and additional required practical skills coursework, graduates will be eligible to take the Minnesota Professional Peace Officer (POST) licensing exam. LAW eNFORceMeNt AcAdeMic CErTifiCATE Standard Length of Program • 3 Quarters Full-Time • 4 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Police Officer • Deputy Sheriff • Law Enforcement Officer • State Trooper • Conservation Officer Foundation Courses Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. Admission into the Law Enforcement Academic Certificate program requires applicants to have earned an associate’s degree or higher (including general education courses equivalent to those in the Law Enforcement AAS) from a regionally accredited school. Applicants are also required to interview with an admissions representative and complete a Rasmussen College placement test as part of the admissions process. In order to sit for the licensing exam, students are also required to successfully complete an officially recognized first-aid course in First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, or Emergency Response, and practical/skills coursework meeting POST objectives. Students must provide the Rasmussen College Law Enforcement POST Coordinator with a copy of their required first-aid certification (e.g., a photocopy of their first-responder card) for inclusion in each student’s POST file maintained at Rasmussen College. Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits J100 J120 J122 J125 J200 J205 J222 J255 LE240 LE245 Introduction to Criminal Justice Policing in America Crime Scene to Conviction: Critical Skills in Documentation Criminal Law and Procedures Domestic Violence Juvenile Justice Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement Ethics in Criminal Justice Minnesota Traffic Code Minnesota Criminal Code Total Degree Credits This program is also offered online. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 36* In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. Program-specific Law Enforcement (LE) coursework is available only at the Eagan, MN campus. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. Objective Graduates of this program know the policy and practice of traffic enforcement, firearms use, defensive tactics, investigations, and pursuit driving. They can perform skills in each area. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity in the criminal justice system. Upon completing this program and additional required academic coursework, graduates will be eligible to take the Minnesota Professional Peace Officer (POST) licensing exam. LAW eNFORceMeNt SkiLLS CErTifiCATE Standard Length of Program • 2 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Police Officer • Deputy Sheriff • Law Enforcement Officer • State Trooper • Conservation Officer Foundation Courses Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. Admission into the Law Enforcement Academic Certificate program requires applicants to have earned an associate’s degree or higher (including general education courses equivalent to those in the Law Enforcement AAS) from a regionally accredited school. Applicants are also required to interview with an admissions representative and complete a Rasmussen College placement test as part of the admissions process. In order to sit for the licensing exam, students are also required to successfully complete an officially recognized first-aid course in First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, or Emergency Response, and practical/skills coursework meeting POST objectives. Students must provide the Rasmussen College Law Enforcement POST Coordinator with a copy of their required first-aid certification (e.g., a photocopy of their first-responder card) for inclusion in each student’s POST file maintained at Rasmussen College. Major and Core Courses Number Course Credits LE200 LE211 LE212 LE221 LE222 LE230 LE240 LE245 LE280 LE290 Traffic Enforcement Firearms I Firearms II Defensive Tactics I Defensive Tactics II Police Investigation Process Minnesota Traffic Code Minnesota Criminal Code Patrol Practicals with Pursuit Driving Law Enforcement Capstone Total Degree Credits 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 4 2 24* In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. Program-specific Law Enforcement (LE) coursework is available only at the Eagan, MN campus. * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 25 SCHool oF JuSTiCE STuDiES Objective Graduates of this program know the principles of legal research and writing. They understand criminal, family, corporate, and real-estate law. They can provide services in all areas of the legal system, such as courts, law firms, and government agencies, under the supervision of an attorney. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and integrity. Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. PARALeGAL CErTifiCATE Standard Length of Program • 4 Quarters Full-Time Career Opportunities • Paralegal • Legal Assistant • Legal Secretary Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math G124 G233 PL100 PL110 PL121 PL122 PL140 PL211 PL212 PL219 PL225 PL230 PL290 Students must demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses either through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. Paralegal Certificate Program Requirements Admissions into the Paralegal Certificate program requires candidates to have earned an associate’s degree which includes general-education courses equivalent to those required in Rasmussen College’s Paralegal AAS, or a bachelor’s degree or higher. Entering students are also required to interview with an admissions representative to complete a Rasmussen College placement test as part of the admissions process. Rasmussen College’s Eagan campus location has been approved by the National Association of Legal Assistants (NALA) as a testing center for the Certified Legal Assistant/Certified Paralegal (CLA/CP) examination. English Composition College Algebra General Education elective** Introduction to Law and the Legal System Introduction to Legal Research Civil Litigation and Procedure I Civil Litigation and Procedure II Contracts Legal Research and Writing I Legal Research and Writing II Law Office Technology Torts Family Law Paralegal Internship 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 Electives (choose 1, for 4 credits) Number Course Credits In addition to meeting all other admissions requirements, applicants to this program must also complete a criminal background check. PL215 PL216 Real Estate Law Corporate Law Total Certificate Credits This Program is also offered online. 4 4 61* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. ** Students must complete one additional general-education course (with a course designator of G) or transfer in the equivalent. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 26 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF NuRSiNG Objective Graduates of this program are prepared to function as an entry-level practical nurse under the direction of a registered nurse, physician, or dentist. They can implement psychomotor technical skills that meet current standards of practice; apply scientific knowledge and skills to meet the biological, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual needs of the patient; provide maintenance, preventative, therapeutic, rehabilitative, and/or supportive care; communicate clear, concise, accurate, complete, and timely information to members of the healthcare team; use therapeutic communication to build and maintain therapeutic relationships with patients and their significant support person(s); use the nursing process to gather data, contribute to nursing diagnosis, guide nursing actions, and contribute to the plan of care; and provide basic individualized, holistic, and culturally sensitive nursing care for patients across the lifespan in a variety of settings. They can implement a personal practice standard that adheres to the legal and ethical standards of the practical nurse as defined by the Minnesota Board of Nursing – Nurse Practice Act, NFLPN, and NAPNES. They value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and post-licensure continuing education as a way to build on previous knowledge and skills and increase competency. Applicants to this program must meet program-specific admissions requirements, in addition to all general Rasmussen College admissions requirements. Please see the application procedures for this program under Academic Information and College Policies. PRActicAL NuRSiNG AAS DEgrEE Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time Career Opportunities • Hospital • Assisted Living • Clinic • Dental Office • Long-Term Care • Physician’s Office Nursing and Career Courses Number Course Credits D111 Computer Information Systems E242 Career Development G124 English Composition* G137 Introduction to Psychology* G141 Introduction to Communication* G142 Introduction to Sociology* G215 Introduction to Human Biology* G233 College Algebra* Humanities (Select 2 courses*) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Number Course 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Credits M120 MA241 MA242 PN100 PN105 PN110 PN115 PN120 PN125 PN130 PN135 PN140 PN145 Medical Terminology Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Nursing Foundations Nutrition & Diet Therapy Introduction to Pharmacology Nursing I Psychosocial Nursing Nursing II Maternal – Child Nursing Nursing III Geriatric Nursing Nursing Seminar Total Degree Credits 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 4 6 4 6 4 2 96 * Students must complete those general education courses listed as required to graduate in this program (G124, G137, G141, G142, G215, and G233) or transfer in the equivalent. In addition, the student must complete two courses from the four listed Humanities electives (G125, G138, G201, and G230) or transfer in the equivalent. Credits accepted in transfer must meet the institution’s guidelines for transfer. To graduate in the program, students must complete all required PN or MA coursework with a grade of C or better, achieve all required skill competencies, and satisfactorily complete all required clinical learning experiences. This program is only offered during the day at the Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Mankato, and St. Cloud campuses.. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 27 SCHool oF TECHNoloGy AND DESiGN Objective Graduates of this program understand how information systems are used in business and how technology adds value to business processes. Depending on the specialization area chosen, graduates will have the skills to install and manage networks, troubleshoot applications and help users, create and modify websites as needed, safeguard networks and proprietary information, manage and utilize databases in a business environment, or utilize IP Telephony to enhance communications for an organization. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and business and professional skills. Foundation Courses Number Course Credits iNFORMAtiON SYSteMS MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Network Administration • Web Programming • Database Administration Computer Information Technology • IP Telephony • Networking Security & Forensics Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 9 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • Computer Support Specialist • Network System Administrator • Network Security Specialist • Computer Application Support Specialist • Web Developer • Database Administrator computer information technology Specialization General Education Courses Number Course Credits Number Course Credits English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Credits B218 D181 D187 D283 N127 N133 N290 S120 W108 E-Commerce Excel Professional Presentations Access Microsoft Windows Workstations Networking Fundamentals Information Technology Capstone Word for Windows Introduction to Website Design 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 Elective Courses for Computer Information Technology (Select one of the following elective groups, for 9 credits) Group I - Information Technician Elective Group N112 PC Hardware and Software I (A+) 3 N113 PC Hardware and Software II (A+) 3 N228 Microsoft Windows Server 3 Total Degree Credits 93* Group II - Multimedia Web Elective Group NM111 Introduction to Computer Graphics NM272 Multimedia Technologies W208 Advanced Website Design Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 3 3 93* database Administration Specialization Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses Number Course B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math 4 4 4 Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. B119 B136 B271 B293 D111 E150 E242 Customer Service Introduction to Business Professional Communication Business Ethics Computer Information Systems Success Strategies Career Development 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 Network Administration Specialization Number Course Credits B220 D283 N127 N228 N270 N271 N272 N273 N290 W112 W114 W122 B220 N112 N113 N127 N133 N141 N208 N226 N228 N234 N235 N290 W122 Project Planning and Documentation PC Hardware and Software I (A+) PC Hardware and Software II (A+) Microsoft Windows Workstations Networking Fundamentals Networking Security Fundamentals Linux Administration Windows Active Directory Microsoft Windows Server Microsoft Exchange Server Cisco Networking Fundamentals and Routing Information Technology Capstone Introduction to Visual Basic 2005 Total Degree Credits Course 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 96* Credits Project Planning and Documentation Access Microsoft Windows Workstations Microsoft Windows Server Oracle Database Administration SQL Server 2005 Administration SQL Server 2005 Development Business Intelligence Reporting Information Technology Capstone Database Design & SQL Fundamentals of Programming Introduction to Visual Basic 2005 Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 93* iP telephony Specialization Number Course Credits B220 N112 N113 N127 N133 N164 N228 N235 N264 N265 N290 Web Programming Specialization Number Project Planning and Documentation PC Hardware and Software I (A+) PC Hardware and Software II (A+) Microsoft Windows Workstations Networking Fundamentals Voice Over IP Fundamentals Microsoft Windows Server Cisco Networking Fundamentals and Routing IP Telephony Quality of Service (QoS) Information Technology Capstone Total Degree Credits Course 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 90* Credits NM272 W110 W112 W114 W116 W118 W122 W210 W215 W216 W222 W290 Multimedia Technologies JavaScript Database Design & SQL Fundamentals of Programming Introduction to Web Design Software Introduction to HTML Introduction to Visual Basic 2005 Java I PERL/CGI PHP/MYSQL Visual Basic 2005 Advanced Web Programming Capstone Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 92* Networking Security and Forensics Specialization Number B220 N112 N113 N127 N133 N141 N228 N235 N251 N252 N253 N290 Project Planning and Documentation PC Hardware and Software I (A+) PC Hardware and Software II (A+) Microsoft Windows Workstations Networking Fundamentals Networking Security Fundamentals Microsoft Windows Server Cisco Networking Fundamentals and Routing Introduction to Computer Forensics Networking Security Advanced Managing Information Security Information Technology Capstone Total Degree Credits 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 93* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 28 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 SCHool oF TECHNoloGy AND DESiGN Objective Graduates of this program know basic theories of visual and interactive media design, project management, and portfolio development. They understand business and can apply this understanding to multimedia projects. They can create multimedia projects involving traditional art techniques, video, and audio assets. Graduates value critical thinking, communication, diverse perspectives, technology and information literacy, and lifelong learning. MuLtiMediA tecHNOLOGieS AAS DEgrEE Digital Design and Animation • Web Design Standard Length of Program • 6 Quarters Full-Time • 8 Quarters Part-Time Career Opportunities • 2D Graphic Design • Print & Digital Advertising • Video Game Art • Interactive Multimedia Specialist • Website Design and Creation Foundation Courses Number Course Credits Major and Core Courses 4 4 4 Number Course Credits B097 B098 B099 Foundations of English I Foundations of English II Foundations of Math Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a STEP placement exam or by successful completion of B097, B098, and/or B099. General Education Courses Number Course Credits B136 B218 B220 B271 E150 E242 NM111 NM113 NM121 NM122 NM124 NM130 NM141 NM252 NM262 NM272 NM280 Number English Composition (Required course) G124 English Composition Communication (Select 1 course) G141 Introduction to Communication G226 Speech Humanities (Select 2 courses) G125 Humanities G138 Introduction to Film G201 Creative Writing G230 Introduction to Literature Math (Select 1 course) G221 Introduction to Statistics G233 College Algebra Natural Sciences (Select 1 course) G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body G215 Introduction to Human Biology G239 Introduction to Astronomy G245 Introduction to Geology Social Sciences (Select 2 courses) G122 World Geography G123 Principles of Economics G137 Introduction to Psychology G142 Introduction to Sociology G243 Contemporary U.S. Government G250 History of the United States in the World 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Introduction to Business E-Commerce Project Planning and Documentation Professional Communication Success Strategies Career Development Introduction to Computer Graphics Introduction to Multimedia and Computer Graphic Arts Typography Digital Publishing Color Theory and Techniques Audio/Video Editing Digital Media Production Fundamentals of Web Authoring and Design Digital Media Assembly Multimedia Technologies Multimedia Portfolio Development Course 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 Credits digital design and Animation Specialization NM110 NM131 NM240 Drawing Design and Art Theory Introduction to 3D Arts and Animation 3-Dimensional Animation Total Degree Credits Course 3 3 3 95* Credits Web design Specialization Number NM115 NM250 NM260 Networking and Internet Technologies Dynamic Content Management Server Side Scripting Total Degree Credits This Degree Program is also offered online. 3 3 3 95* * Credit totals do not include Foundations of English I/II or Foundations of Math. These courses may be required of some students based upon placement examinations. buSiNeSS MANAGeMeNt BS DEgrEE Internet Marketing • See School of Business on Page 15 buSiNeSS MANAGeMeNt AAS DEgrEE Internet Marketing • See School of Business on Page 17 R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 29 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS Most programs use a combination of lecture and laboratory methods of instruction. A class period, particularly in a technology-intensive learning environment, is defined as either lecture or laboratory depending primarily on whether new material is introduced. Lecture is a class setting in which the student is instructed in the theory, principles, and history of an academic or vocational subject. The student should expect a requirement of two hours of outside preparation for each hour of lecture instruction. Some lecture classes have additional time scheduled without additional charge to the student to provide for individualized coaching. Laboratory is a setting in which the student applies information and demonstrates, tests, or practices for reinforcement skills previously acquired through lecture or outside reading. An instructor is normally present in the laboratory setting, but for coaching and clarification rather than for presentation of new material. Two hours of laboratory have the credit equivalency of one hour of lecture. Internship (also externship or practicum) is program-related work experience with indirect instructor supervision and employer assessment, usually coupled with lecture sessions in which the workplace experience is discussed. Three hours of internship have the credit equivalency of one hour of lecture. The individual student’s ability to attain the necessary competencies may influence the number of clock hours necessary to complete an individual course. Prerequisites may be waived in unusual circumstances, but only with the consent of the instructor and approval of the Academic Dean or Campus Director. A B CC D ES F G HS J LA LE M MA ML, PB MT N NM PL PN PT R S ST W - Accounting - Business - Child Care - Computers - Exercise Science - Banking and Finance - General Education - Human Services - Criminal Justice - Law - Law Enforcement - Medical/Allied Health - Medical Assisting - Medical Laboratory Technician - Massage Therapy - Network - Multimedia - Paralegal - Practical Nursing - Pharmacy Technician - Retail/Sales - Secretarial/Office Administration - Surgical Technologies - Web Programming A272 Intermediate Accounting I 40 hours, 4 credits This course covers a review of accounting procedures, and then expands to specialized treatment of financial statements, cash and temporary assets, receivables, inventories (general and estimating procedures), current liabilities, income tax procedures in accounting, and the acquisition, use, and retirement of long-term plant assets. Prerequisite: Accounting III A274 Intermediate Accounting II 40 hours, 4 credits A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I, this course finishes coverage of valuation of assets and liabilities, and continues in stockholder’s equity. Areas included are analysis and interpretation of financial statements. Miscellaneous topics included are accounting changes, error corrections, and prior period adjustments. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting I A276 Financial Investigation 40 hours, 4 credits This course will introduce students to the field of fraud examination and how fraud occurs and is detected within financial statements. This course will expand in areas of revenue, inventory, liabilities, assets, and inadequate disclosures related to financial statement investigations and fraud. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting I A280 Accounting Capstone* 20 hours, 2 credits This course will be a synthesis of the accounting, business, and general education courses offered in the Accounting associate’s degree program. A study of emerging issues and timely topics in financial accounting, professional ethics, and transferable skills necessary for the success of an accounting graduate, and accounting careers will be discussed. This course focuses on research, case analysis, and inter-personal communication and class presentations. Prerequisite: Offered last or second-to-last quarter for associate’s degree students. A310 Managerial Accounting 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides a survey of the theory and application of managerial accounting principles. Topics include cost behaviors, production costing methods, data processing, economic analysis, budgeting, and management and financial control. Prerequisite: Accounting II B097 Foundations of English I 40 hours, 4 credits This course emphasizes grammar usage, basic punctuation, and sentence structure. Prerequisite: Placement determined by placement test score. B098 Foundations of English II 40 hours, 4 credits This course emphasizes mastery of grammar and punctuation usage, paragraph structure, and strategy. Prerequisite: Placement determined by placement test score. B099 Foundations of Math 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of the fundamentals of mathematics in the following areas: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, and percentages. Prerequisite: Placement determined by placement test score. B119 Customer Service 40 hours, 4 credits This course covers the basic concepts of essential communication skills needed in business to interact/work effectively with individuals and/or groups. Special areas of emphasis include solving problems, developing a customer service strategy, coping with challenging customers, increasing customer retention and surveying customer satisfaction. Prerequisite: none B136 Introduction to Business 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of the characteristics and functions of business in a free enterprise environment and how business impacts the economy in which we live. Characteristics studied may include opportunities, organizations, management, marketing, analysis and any other activities related to general ownership and operation. Prerequisite: none B140 Sales Techniques 40 hours, 4 credits An introductory course in sales emphasizing the principles and practices of a professional salesperson. Course focus is on the information, skills, and activities necessary for success in today’s marketplace. Prerequisite: none B146 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 40 hours, 4 credits Students will learn the basic concepts of entrepreneurship. Through real-life case studies, students will examine entrepreneurship as a means to executing against market opportunities. They will explore entrepreneurship for products and services across industries, sectors, markets, and regions. Students will also review the lifecycle of entrepreneurial business development. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business B165 Introduction to Human Resource Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course is an introduction to the management and leadership of an organization’s human resource. It explores the importance of establishing or administrating the goals, policies, and procedures of the organization. Topics discussed include: communication, employee benefits, interview techniques, motivation, safety, hiring, discipline, and employment guide lines. Prerequisite: none B180 Meeting Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course will introduce students to the basic tools and skills needed to host and facilitate a variety of types of meetings. The course will also study the theory and practice of parliamentary procedure skills that are used in larger and more formal assemblies. Prerequisite: none Online-Only Courses Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. Few if any residential sections of those courses will be scheduled. Please check with your Campus Director and/or Dean for details. A151 Accounting I 40 hours, 4 credits This course defines accounting objectives and their relation to business. The student will be taught the fundamental principles of accounting and will be trained in the bookkeeping function of properly recording transactions in journals and posting to ledgers. The trial balance, working papers, financial statements, and completing an accounting cycle are introduced. Prerequisite: none A152 Accounting II 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a continuation of Accounting I with additional concern with financial statement analysis for partnerships and corporations. The course will emphasize valuing assets including; property plant equipment, inventory and accounts receivable and will address the classification of accounts, notes, payroll liabilities, and monthly adjustments. Prerequisite: Accounting I A153 Accounting III 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a further continuation of Accounting II and will emphasize corporate accounting, corporate issuing and investing in debt and equity securities, financial and cash-flow analysis, and decision-making. The course will include manufacturing accounting methods used for budgeting and forecasting Prerequisite: Accounting II A177 Payroll Accounting 40 hours, 4 credits Focus is on computing and paying of wages and salaries, social security taxes and benefits, federal and state employment insurance and taxes, and payroll accounting systems and records. Prerequisite: Accounting I A269 Income Tax 40 hours, 4 credits Course is designed to provide knowledge of the rights, options, and requirements in filing returns for the individual and small business. Prerequisite: Accounting II Credit Definition Credit Hour - The unit by which Rasmussen College measures its coursework. The number of credit hours assigned to a course usually reflects the combination of class, laboratory, and/or internship hours required in the course. Rasmussen College follows the quarter system, and awards one credit for each 10 clock hours of lecture, 20 clock hours of laboratory, or 30 clock hours of internship, externship, practicum contained in a quarter, or the equivalent in directed study. Clock Hour - Equal to 50 minutes of instruction. How to read course descriptions Course description numbers that fall below 100 are considered developmental courses. Course description numbers that range from 100-199 are considered entry level courses. Course description numbers that range from 200-299 are considered to be more advanced courses and may function as second-year courses or capstone courses. Course description numbers that range from 300-399 are considered upper division courses that may function as third-year courses. Course description numbers that range from 400-499 are considered advanced upper division courses that may function as fourth-year requirements for a Bachelor’s degree. Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 30 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS B218 E-Commerce 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to introduce students to new models for the practice of business as it is affected by new technologies. From ethical issues related to customer privacy to the problems related to timely contract fulfillment, this course engages the student in analyzing the potentials and problems the Internet offers. Topics covered include a survey of strategies and organizational models for new and existing businesses on the Internet, the impact of e-commerce on customer relations (advertising, marketing, customer service), using information technologies for accounting, managing inventories and security, and designing strategies for keeping current with changes in the practice of e-business. Prerequisite: none B220 Project Planning and Documentation* 40 hours, 4 credits This course encompasses timelines, deadlines, team-building, communication issues and problem solving. The course is set with predefined scenarios to assist with the definition of project roles and phases. The students work through related issues and produce a resolution in a well written format. Prerequisites: Intended for student’s last quarter. B223 Internet Consumer Behavior* 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed in three basic sections which provide students a full understanding of the way consumers shop and how products are best marketed. Section one explores the consumer motives for buying specific to personality traits, demographics and psychographics. Section two covers marketing tactics for the savvy non-persuasive consumer and the final section covers managerial and group decision making. This course assists students to understand and apply the concepts of consumer behavior to real companies and marketing situations through the use of current case-studies, visuals and scientific research on consumer behavior. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B224 Marketing Ethics* 40 hours, 4 credits Using current case-studies, this course is designed to provide students the opportunity to discuss and debate the difference between ethical and unethical business conduct. Students will then use this information to understand how today’s ideals and principles are applied to the practice of ethical reasoning, marketing decision making and accurate reporting with the purpose of understanding guidelines designed to protect and inform today’s consumers. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B228 Search Engine Marketing* 40 hours, 4 credits This course combines a unique mix of business, writing, and technical skills as students develop an understanding of the basics of search marketing, a search marketing program, and the steps involved in the execution and tracking of success. This course will assist students in understanding the complexities and similarities of online marketing vehicles, paid marketing, organic marketing, and how to purchase online media for the purpose of creating a quality marketing mix. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B229 Target/Audience Messaging* 40 hours, 4 credits This course explores the necessity of using DDM (data driven marketing) to decide between your best market, marginal market and those who are not your market. This course begins with the concept of “Allowable Cost Per Order” (ACPO) This course will provide students an understanding of the critical economic factors which determine market success and how to use them as a competitive advantage. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B230 Principles of Finance 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of financial institutions, investment techniques, and financial management. Students will examine acquisition of funds, cash flow, financial analysis, capital budgeting, working capital requirements, and capital structure. Prerequisite: Accounting I B231 Web Media Marketing* 40 hours, 4 credits This course explores emerging and innovative business and marketing technologies and techniques such as weblogs and podcasting. In addition to investigating the newest communication tools, this course will also address creating and evaluating proposals, media purchasing and online public relations. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B232 Principles of Marketing 40 hours, 4 credits This course serves as an introduction to the marketing concept, integrating seven key marketing perspectives. Topics include consumer buying behavior, business-tobusiness markets and organizational buying behavior, market research techniques, fundamental pricing concepts, marketing channels and logistics, integrated marketing communications, and marketing’s role in electronic commerce. Prerequisite: none B233 Principles of Management 40 hours, 4 credits A study of the aspects of the practice of management necessary for the development of managerial skills and insight. Prerequisite: none B234 Business Law 40 hours, 4 credits This course presents fundamental principles of law applicable to business transactions. The course relates areas of legal environment of business and sales contracts. Principles of law that apply to government, regulations, commercial paper, property, bailments, agency and business organizations are addressed. Prerequisite: none B240 Entrepreneurial Product and Service Planning 40 hours, 4 credits Students will explore the ways in which products and services are developed. They will review the various methods used to identify market opportunities, to engage in market sizing, and to develop an understanding of the competition. Students will develop a basic product or service plan, which will include a detailed description of how the product or service will be designed, sourced or manufactured, and delivered to the client. Students will also examine the lifecycle of products and services once they are launched. Prerequisite: Introduction to Entrepreneurship B242 Multicultural Communications for Business* 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to the challenges a diverse workforce presents in today’s global economy. Specific areas of study will be coping with diverse communication styles, allowing for divergent approaches to task completion, mitigating different attitudes toward conflict, and resolution management and protocols for ensuring multicultural collaboration. Prerequisite: none B243 Entrepreneurial Marketing 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine all aspects of entrepreneurial marketing. Using marketing case studies, students will explore several entrepreneurial marketing tactics and will create a marketing strategy for their chosen product or service. From this strategy, students will create a complete market plan. They will also present their ideas to the class. Prerequisite: Introduction to Entrepreneurship B244 Entrepreneurial Finance: Capitalization for the Entrepreneur 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine the ways in which entrepreneurial ventures are financed. They will explore how to raise both start-up and operating capital. Students will participate in a simulation designed to teach them the value of financial management and the practical use of tools such as profit and loss statements, balance sheets, income and cash flow statements. Prerequisite: Principles of Finance B247 Entrepreneurial Internship 120 hours, 4 credits Students will complete an unpaid internship with a local entrepreneur or business owner. The College facilitates the process of matching students with entrepreneurs. The internship will integrate prior coursework into a comprehensive understanding of entrepreneurship, providing students with hands-on learning opportunities and work experience. During the internship, the student will shadow the entrepreneur and write a series of short, reflective papers based on their experience. Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship student in last or second-to-last quarter B249 Risk Management and Insurance* 40 hours, 4 credits A survey of the general principles of risk management and insurance and their role in business. Topics include the relationship of risk transfer, risk avoidance, and risk retention to risk management and loss control methods as used for decision making in human resources and finance. Emphasis is placed on the risk management process which includes the identification of risks, evaluation of risks, and selection of an appropriate management response, implementation, and review. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Resource Management B250 Training and Development* 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of training and development fundamentals including how training relates to Human Resource Management and Human Resource Development, how internal and external factors influence employee behavior, and the role of adult learning in training. Students will examine how training needs are determined, best practices in developing and implementing training programs, and how to evaluate training efforts. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Resource Management B263 Principles of Advertising 40 hours, 4 credits Theory, principles and functions of advertising, its role and its social and economic structure. Newspapers, magazines, radio and television area reviewed as advertising media Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing B267 Employment Law* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will develop an understanding of selected legal issues involved in human resource management. Legal issues to be addressed include: labor relations, employee rights, sexual harassment, diversity, and compensation and benefits law. The primary orientation of the course will be to enable learners to recognize the spirit and purpose of the legal framework of enterprise so that learners can embrace compatible strategies and avoid cutting corners in the short-run, which can ultimately result in major disasters. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Resource Management B268 Compensation and Benefits Management* 40 hours, 4 credits This course content addresses the trends and evolution of compensation and benefits at both the strategic and operational dimensions. Evaluation of costs associated with various approaches to compensation and benefits is explored. This course will help students understand the role that an integrated total compensation program can play in contributing to organizational success. You will learn about effective compensation strategies and how various emerging issues impact program design. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Resource Management B270 Introduction to Global Business* 40 hours, 4 credits This course will explore the importance of developing varied techniques for managing all aspects of a global business venture. Through real-life case studies, students will investigate the interconnectivity in global business specific to languages, attitudes, religious beliefs, traditions, work ethic, political & legal systems, governmental regulation, fiscal and monetary policies, infrastructure, and market potentials. Prerequisite: none B271 Professional Communication 40 hours, 4 credits This course teaches communication theory and skills for developing professional documents and oral presentations for audiences in diverse communities and disciplines. To equip students to communicate effectively, this course emphasizes thinking and writing within global contexts, in collaborative situations, and in various electronic environments. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of English II or placement determined by STEP assessment score. B272 Call Center Strategic Leadership* 40 hours, 4 credits This course will focus on strategic leadership specific to assembling and preparing a strong team, defining quality assurance methodologies, determining appropriate performance metrics, executing motivation and retention strategies and understanding legal and personnel issues in correlation with strategic leadership as seen through project, financial and risk management. Prerequisite: none Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 31 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS B275 Call Center Customer Service Representative Skills* 40 hours, 4 credits Considering the success of any call center rests in the hands of its Customer Service Representatives, it is critical that training, continual skills assessment and professional development opportunities are incorporated into the business cycle. This course will define the requisite skills for exemplar reps as well as discuss different assessment tools and skill building techniques. Further, this course will also examine Customer Relationship Management (CRM) principles specific to call routing applications. Prerequisite: none B276 Call Center Labor Force Management* 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to determining the staffing requirements which balance customer requests and satisfaction and while meeting budget margins critical to the overall success of the business. As such, this course will focuses on the forecasting of labor force needs, staffing requests, understanding of daily service management requirements, and the benefits and barriers to the incorporation of automated software tools to assist in this process. Prerequisite: none B278 Call Center Operations Management* 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to technologies and tools available for call centers and their applications. Starting with the importance of site selection, facility design and management, this course will progress systematically through the process of developing a call center from inception to execution. Prerequisite: none B280 Business Capstone* 20 hours, 2 credits This course is designed to allow students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the Business Management Associate Degree program. Through case analysis, class discussion, and supervised field experience, students will synthesize and demonstrate their understanding of core business concepts via completion of a Capstone project. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Business Associate’s Degree program and in their last or second-to-last quarter. B293 Business Ethics 40 hours, 4 credits This course presents an examination of current moral and ethical issues that arise in the world of business, as well as an analysis of the main theories of moral obligation, right and wrong action, and good and bad values. Prerequisite: none B333 Principles of Management II 40 hours, 4 credits Through theory, self-analysis, and analysis of others, this course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to become an effective manager. Specific topics covered include managing stress; solving problems; coaching, influencing, and motivating others; team-building; and leading change. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B340 Applied Internet Marketing 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed as an introduction to the rapidly evolving world of Internet marketing. The course is designed in 3 sections starting with the study of the functionality of Internet use, working with different Internet protocols, programming on the Internet, the Internet infrastructure. It not only introduces a variety of concepts, but also discusses in depth the most significant aspects of Internet shopping which provide students a full understanding of e-commerce. Section two takes a more focused look at the motives behind consumer purchasing. The third step is a special focus on applying the concepts of consumer behavior to student-created enterprises based on exposure to models in previous business coursework. Prerequisite: Internet Consumer Behavior B341 E-Strategies and Development 40 hours, 4 credits The objective of this course is to introduce aspects of e-commerce through its use in today’s computerized business environment. This course will examine current technologies, protocols, visual applications, and business applications comprised in the Internet. This course will focus on current technology-savvy companies for case-study models, and will examine the structured merge between strategic commerce and technical integration. It will also focus on functional information-delivery systems. During the course, students will begin dissecting the visual elements used in the creation of effective web campaigns while also learning the successful business strategies that drive them. Prerequisite: E-Commerce B342 Audience and Application 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an overview of the development, design, and delivery process used in successful electronic marketing campaigns. Building upon prior knowledge of DDM (data driven marketing) this course focuses on the effective use of technology and design in the marketing message. Specifically, students will explore effective design techniques using the visual medium of web development. This course will address steps necessary for the incorporation of visual medium to create a competitive advantage through effective marketing to its chosen target market. Prerequisite: Target/Audience Messaging B350 Microeconomics for Business 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the effect of market forces on human behavior, firms, industries, and government within a microeconomic context. Students will apply microeconomic theories to contemporary business settings. Prerequisite: Principles of Economics B351 Management of Information Systems 40 hours, 4 credits Students are introduced to the foundations of management information systems. This includes current trends, fundamental MIS technology concepts, applications for business functions, and management practice. Students will gain exposure to analyzing, utilizing, and supervising integrated management information systems. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems, Introduction to Business B352 International Business 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides management students with an introduction to international economic, political, cultural and business environments. Students will develop a basic understanding and appreciation of the myriad factors involved in managing people within a global workforce. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B360 Operations Management 40 hours, 4 credits In this course students examine the operations function of managing people, information, technology, materials, and facilities to produce goods and services. Specific areas covered will include designing and managing operations; purchasing raw materials; controlling and maintaining inventories; and producing goods or services that meet customers’ expectations. Quantitative modeling will be used for solving business problems. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business B370 Organizational Behavior Analysis 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to explore human behavior in work settings from an interdisciplinary perspective. The following topics will be studied and analyzed from a management perspective: organizational structure, leadership, power, conflict management, individual and group dynamics, motivation, morale, and communication. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business B371 Research and Report Writing 40 hours, 4 credits Students will learn research and report writing for academic settings. Topics will include qualitative and quantitative research methodology, literature reviews, information literacy, and academic report writing. Prerequisite: English Composition or Professional Communication B404 Negotiation and Conflict Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course will focus on negotiation and conflict management in business and other organizational settings. The emphasis is on gaining an understanding of the negotiation process and developing effective negotiation and conflict management skills. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business B420 Organizational Development 40 hours, 4 credits This seminar course builds upon the theories introduced in Organizational Behavior Analysis. In this course, students examine how qualitative approaches, quantitative approaches, and process-based approaches to organizational development through the stories of professionals involved in organizational change. Students will critically examine the design, management, and control of organizational development programs. Prerequisite: Organizational Behavior Analysis B440 Managing a Diverse Workforce 40 hours, 4 credits This seminar course examines diversity from a personal, group, organizational, national, and global perspective. Students will explore stereotypes of individuals within organizations, and they will study how these stereotypes affect people within the workplace. Students will also examine issues in conducting business and managing people within a global setting. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B441 Personnel and Labor Relations 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the context of labor relations, the collective bargaining process, labor contracts, and labor relations. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B460 Strategic Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to integrate prior business courses through study, discussion, and creation of strategic management plans. Students will evaluate the key functions of organizations and integration of these functions to understand the best practices used to achieve competitive advantages. Topics will include strategic formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business B490 Business, Society, and Ethics 40 hours, 4 credits In this course, students examine the interrelationship among business and societal ethics. Students will study how property, profit, justice, corporations, and individual beliefs and actions affect thoughts, actions, and decisions. Through evaluating the ethical decisions of others, students will explain, analyze, and evaluate their own ethical decision processes. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B492 Contemporary Leadership Challenges 40 hours, 4 credits This seminar course examines current issues within the management field. This course is highly interactive in that both students and faculty are actively engaged in researching, presenting, and discussing course materials. In addition to gaining in-depth exposure to a current key topic in the field, students learn to become active and effective members of a professional learning community. Prerequisite: Principles of Management B498 Management Capstone* 30 hours, 3 credits In this course, students analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and create new knowledge by reviewing, contemplating, and applying theoretical concepts studied throughout their degree in creating a solution for an actual management need. This course is designed to be taken during the student’s last semester. Prerequisite: Business BS student in last or second-to-last quarter. CC151A Foundations of Child Development 40 hours, 4 credits This course will explore characteristics of children at different ages, children’s developmental needs, and the foundation of early-childhood education. Students will learn the fundamentals of developmentally appropriate practice as it relates to child development, individual needs, building self-esteem in children, and using interpersonal skills and communication within the classroom and center. Students will study the function of the family, and the cultural, social, class, and ethnic variations in the family as a social system. Prerequisite: none Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 32 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS CC152 Early Childhood Education Curriculum and Instruction 40 hours, 4 credits This course promotes the development of young children in the academic, social, and emotional domains. It examines developmentally appropriate methods for writing and assessing behavioral objectives, lesson plans, and activity goals. Various curriculum models will be reviewed. Strategies to enhance parent and family involvement will be emphasized. Prerequisite: none CC153A Health, Safety, and Nutrition 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the role of early childhood professionals working in the field via the policies and procedures governed by the state. Students will learn guidelines for establishing safe environments. They will also learn strategies for implementing health policies, controlling disease, establishing proper nutrition, and responding to children’s special health concerns. Students will carry out a 2-hour observation in the field of education. Prerequisite: none CC154A Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Classroom 240 hours, 8 credits Under externship supervision, the student will observe and implement developmentally appropriate practice techniques while interacting with children and family. Prerequisite: none CC155 Creating a Learning Environment 300 hours, 10 credits Continuation of Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Clasroom. The focus is on developmentally appropriate practices and leadership. Prerequisite: Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Classroom CC156 Implementing Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 300 hours, 10 credits This course is a continuation of Observing and Promoting Development in the Early Childhood Classroom. The focus is on developmentally appropriate practices and leadership. Prerequisite: Creating a Learning Environment CC258A Infant and Toddler Development 40 hours, 4 credits This course will provide the foundation for responsive, relationship-based curriculum for infants and toddlers in group care. This course will introduce the philosophy and theory behind primary care, continuity of care, and respectful care as it relates to brain and attachment research. Explores ways of creating environments for infant/toddler group care which foster optimum social/emotional, physical, and cognitive development. Prerequisite: none CC259 Dynamics of the Family 40 hours, 4 credits This course will focus on the dynamics of the family and the family’s influence on the growth and development of children. The history of family systems, child rearing, and parenting styles will be discussed. The course will explore issues that families of today face. Prerequisite: none CC260A The Exceptional Child 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to explore the benefits of inclusion in the early-childhood setting. Students will develop an understanding of exceptional development. Students will identify the parties relevant to exceptional development and their roles as resources in support of the child and their families. Prerequisite: none CC261A Emerging Literacy through Children’s Literature 40 hours, 4 credits This course covers the history, selection, and integration of literature and language in the early-childhood curriculum. Topics include developmentally appropriate children’s literature and the use of books and other media to enhance language and literacy in the early childhood setting. Strategies for enhancing emerging literacy through techniques such as selecting appropriate books for storytelling, reading aloud, puppetry, and flannel-board use will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: none D111 Computer Information Systems 40 hours, 3 credits This course is an introductory course designed to teach students fundamental computer concepts as well as serve as an introduction to the Microsoft Office suite. The focus of this course will include Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. This course will briefly cover email, Internet and Windows file management, as the course prepares students for a computerized work place. Prerequisite: none D181 Excel 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to investigate the advanced applications and concepts available in Microsoft Office Excel. Students will be introduced to electronic spreadsheet features ranging from the data input and manipulation to charting and PivotTables. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Excel portion of the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems D187 Professional Presentations 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to incorporate two Microsoft Office presentation programs into a single, powerful tool that can be used to create Professional Presentations. Students will learn to use PowerPoint and Publisher as partners in creating multidimensional presentations. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems D279 Computer Focused Principles 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to teach students to accomplish common accounting functions through the use of the computer. Students will learn to maintain accounting records on a computer, input and process information and produce standard accounting reports. This course covers common accounting functions such as maintaining accounts receivable, accounts payable and general ledgers. Prerequisite: Accounting I D283 Access 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to investigate the advanced applications and concepts available in Microsoft Office Access. Students will be introduced to database management features ranging from the creation and modification of databases to maintaining data integrity. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Access portion of the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems E150 Success Strategies 40 hours, 4 credits This course will enable students to develop positive skills that ensure success in the college setting and workplace. Specific topics in learning and study strategies will lead students to develop and utilize appropriate study techniques, ensuring academic success. Topics in life skills will lead to a better understanding of self and others in our diverse world, and encourage the development and utilization of strategies to promote positive relationships, selfmanagement, and professionalism. Prerequisite: none E242 Career Development 20 hours, 2 credits The course is designed to study the personal and professional characteristics necessary for obtaining and maintaining suitable employment. The student will assemble a complete job-seeking portfolio including his/ her resume and references, letters of application and appreciation, documentation of work and educational history, and demonstration of skills through examples of student work. The course includes an in-depth study of self-marketing approaches, job interviewing techniques and professionalism as well as participation in a mock interview. Prerequisite: none ES100 Introduction to Exercise Science 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces students to the field of exercise science. It covers subfields of exercise science, including physiological responses to exercise, nutrition, and biomechanics. Students will learn the field’s history, philosophy, and current trends and issues. Career paths and professional organizations will also be discussed. Students will become CPR-certified. Prerequisite: none ES110 Fitness Theory and Assessment 40 hours, 3 credits This course covers the theory and practice of fitness assessment, exercise prescription, and program design. Students will learn the professional standards behind fitness assessment and prescription. The stages necessary to design and implement a client’s fitness and exercise program will also be covered. Prerequisite: Introduction to Exercise Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ES200 Exercise Physiology 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the human physiological response to exercise. The topics covered include nutrition, exercise’s effects on the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, and the exercise physiology of selected populations. The effects of acute and chronic exercise will be explored. Prerequisite: Kinesiology II ES205 Nutrition for Exercise Science 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an advanced study of nutrition’s relationship to exercise and physical health. Students will explore nutritional requirements for people with specific health concerns or dietary requirements. Students will learn approaches to developing nutrition and food-preparation recommendations for clients interesting in maintaining or losing weight. Prerequisite: Nutrition and Diet Therapy ES220 Resistance Training Techniques 40 hours, 3 credits This course will introduce students to programs for building strength and endurance. Students will begin with the aspects of safe and effective training programs. They will explore conditioning techniques in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Fitness Theory and Assessment ES225 Musculoskeletal Injuries 40 hours, 3 credits This course covers common musculoskeletal injuries and their treatment and management. Topics include the basics of healing and rehabilitation, therapeutic exercise techniques and applications, and applications to specific musculoskeletal regions. Students will learn to develop basic treatment regimens for different types of musculoskeletal injuries. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I ES230 Event Training Techniques 40 hours, 3 credits This course provides students with a theoretical and practical introduction to training regimens for athletic events. Types of events covered include cycling, sprints, swimming, triathlons, and Ironman. Nutrition and fitness plans will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Fitness Theory and Assessment ES240 Exercise for Special Populations 40 hours, 3 credits A continuation of Fitness Theory and Assessment, this course introduces students to the considerations involved in developing exercise programs for special populations. The benefits and risks of physical activity for various populations will be addressed. Students will learn to assess members of special populations and develop appropriate fitness plans. Prerequisite: Fitness Theory and Assessment ES245 Exercise and Aging 40 hours, 3 credits This course expands the student’s understanding of exercise and its effects on older individuals. The physiological effects of aging will be discussed. Students will be able to identify the special health and fitness considerations for older individuals, and apply this knowledge to exercise prescription for older individuals. Prerequisite: Fitness Theory and Assessment, Exercise Physiology ES250 Worksite Health Promotion 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines health-promotion programs that are delivered through the worksite. Planning and assessment strategies for new and mature programs will be covered. Students will explore administration, partnerships, and communication technologies that will assist with the programs. Prerequisite: Fitness Theory and Assessment ES280 Exercise Science Capstone 20 hours, 2 credits This course is designed to help students integrate the information and skills learned in the Exercise Science program. Students will complete a capstone project that incorporates fitness assessment, exercise prescription, nutrition recommendation, and training techniques. Prerequisite: Exercise Science AAS student in last or second-to-last quarter. F111 Introduction to Banking* 40 hours, 4 credits This course is the standard introduction to the banking profession. It touches on nearly every aspect of banking, from the fundamentals of negotiable instruments to contemporary issues and developments within the industry. Prerequisite: none Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 33 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS F212 Fundamentals of Consumer Lending* 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides the basic knowledge about consumer credit. It will cover terminology, basic categories of consumer credit, determining credit worthiness, and the application process. It includes the origin of regulations protecting consumer credit transactions, and reviews specific regulations that apply to consumer credit. Prerequisite: Introduction to Banking F213 Introduction to Mortgage Lending* 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines mortgage lending, not only from the aspect of lending to individuals for the purchase of a residence, but also that of providing loans for apartment buildings and loans for real estate developers and builders. It covers construction and permanent financing for residential property; real estate law; documentation; mortgage loan servicing; the secondary mortgage market; the role of government in mortgage lending; and residential real estate as an investment. Prerequisite: Introduction to Banking F215 Principles of Banking Law* 40 hours, 4 credits This course will guide students through the legal and regulatory issues. Every part of the banking process, from taking deposits and making loans to operating safe deposit boxes and offering trust services, is governed by laws for the purpose of protecting consumers or maintaining the safety and soundness of the bank. Prerequisite: Introduction to Banking G122 World Geography 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to the nature of geographic inquiry; the where and why of people’s locations and activities. The interactions of physical, political, economic, and social systems are studied. These themes are illustrated by various examples from regions, areas, and countries of the world. Prerequisite: none G123 Principles of Economics 40 hours, 4 credits This course offers a broad overview of economic theory, history, and development. Philosophies, policies, and terms of market economies will be explored. This course introduces microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. Prerequisite: none G124 English Composition 40 hours, 4 credits This course is intended to help students develop their ability to write and express ideas in an organized, unified, coherent manner that reflects an appropriate awareness of purpose and audience. Through writing, reading, and discussion, students will learn to synthesize their thoughts as they communicate more effectively. Course concepts are applied to essays, research projects, and specialized writing. Regular writing and revision will improve students’ grammar, punctuation and usage skills. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of English II or placement determined by STEP assessment score. G125 Humanities 40 hours, 4 credits This course investigates human creative achievement. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding and appreciation of cultural literacy and the pursuit of humanitarian goals. Representative disciplines may include art, music, literature, architecture, drama, and philosophy. Prerequisite: none G137 Introduction to Psychology 40 hours, 4 credits This course will introduce students to the scientific study of human behavior. Course topics will include the following: heredity and environment, development of the individual, motivation, emotion, perception, personality and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: none G138 Introduction to Film 40 hours, 4 credits This course is an introduction to the main types of film, to expressiveness of film techniques, and to ways in which we can better understand and appreciate both individual films and the medium as a whole. The goals are to introduce students to a diverse group of important American as well as international films and to teach them the necessary criteria for closely examining the characteristics of the film medium. As a result of this process, students will become more sophisticated and satisfied viewers. We will look at how films exemplify particular genres and analyze the film’s contexts as well as the ways in which viewers formulate meanings. We will concern ourselves with the aesthetic qualities of given films and genres; we will, moreover, investigate the cultural significance of these works. Prerequisite: none G141 Introduction to Communication 40 hours, 4 credits The course will introduce students to basic models and theories of the communication process. Students will learn about a variety of elements involved in communication. They will also explore how factors such as race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, and gender influence communication. Students will focus on developing an awareness of the effects of various types of communication on themselves and others. They will also develop practical skills for improving their ability to communicate in personal, social and professional contexts. Specific topics will include perception, self-concept, verbal and non-verbal communication, effective listening and communicating in culturally diverse settings. Prerequisite: none G142 Introduction to Sociology 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to enable students to recognize their own culture-based values, feelings, and attitudes while developing a better understanding of cultural values that may differ from their own. It will cover basic sociological topics such as socialization, gender, race, social organization, and social change. Through the course students should achieve a better understanding of themselves and society. Prerequisite: none G150 Structure and Function of the Human Body 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides a working knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. A general introduction to cells and tissues is followed by study of the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems. The student is introduced to the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: none G201 Creative Writing 40 hours, 4 credits This course will develop the student’s talents in creative writing. Various forms of writing will be studied, such as short stories, novels, poems, plays and non-fiction. Works by students and others will be critiqued. Students will also develop editorial skills so that each writer may revise and improve his/her work. Students will compose a minimum of 6000 words over the course of the program. Prerequisites: Passing grade in Foundations of English II or placement determined by STEP assessment score. G215 Introduction to Human Biology 50 hours, 4 credits Students will explore fundamental concepts of human biology. They will examine cell structure and function, body systems, and biochemistry. They will also learn basic concepts of genetics and evolution. Students will explore the relationship of human populations and the ecosystem. Prerequisites: none G221 Introduction to Statistics 40 hours, 4 credits In this course students will learn to use various measures of location and variability to describe data. Concepts such as graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, conditional probability laws, discrete random variable, binomial and normal random variables, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, large and small sample confidence intervals for parameters associated with a single population and for comparison of two populations will be discussed. Hypothesis testing for large and small samples will be illustrated. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of Math or placement determined by STEP assessment score. G226 Speech 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to teach the student how to research and plan, arrange and compose, and deliver informative, persuasive, expressive, impromptu, and extemporaneous speeches for various audiences. Students will also analyze and evaluate the arguments and rhetorical methods used in public communication to help them develop the ability to speak clearly and effectively, and to think logically. Students will also explore techniques for overcoming speech anxiety. Prerequisite: none G230 Introduction to Literature 40 hours, 4 credits This course offers an introduction to the most common literary genres: Fiction, poetry, drama, and literary non-fiction. Students will study the basic elements of each genre, learn how to compare genres, become familiar with sample texts that illustrate the particularities of each genre, and practice the skills of analyzing and writing about literary texts. Prerequisite: none [English Comp. recommended] G233 College Algebra 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides students with the skills to achieve mastery of algebraic terminology and applications including, but not limited to, real number operations, variables, polynomials, integer exponents, graphs, factoring, quadratic equations, and word problems. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundations of Math or placement determined by STEP assessment score. G239 Introduction to Astronomy 40 hours, 4 credits A study of the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the universe. Topics include the structure of the celestial bodies, recognizing them, and understanding the influence they have on each other. Prerequisite: none G243 Contemporary US Government 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to the US system of government, including its parts, institutions, and evolution, and will help students understand how the government works on the national, state and local level. To explore how the US government affects its citizens and how citizens participate in their government, students will address current problems and issues grounded in legal history, theory, and ethics. Prerequisite: none G245 Introduction to Geology 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introductory look at the physical processes that shape the earth. Topics include the origin, structure, and systems of the earth, minerals, rock formation, plate tectonics, and volcanoes and earthquakes. Geologic time, global change, and humanenvironment interaction will also be explored. Students will complete a research paper on a contemporary issue in geology. Prerequisite: none G250 History of the United States in the World 40 hours, 4 credits This course will explore the ways in which the United States emerged as a leader in the world in the 20th century and beyond. To expose students to various viewpoints, a theme of the course will be the interconnection of events in the United States during this period with those occurring simultaneously throughout the world. The political, social, and economic aspects of the history of the United States in this time will be explored amid a diversity of human cultures, values, and perspectives within the country and the world. Prerequisite: none G324 Advanced Composition 40 hours, 4 credits This advanced writing course is intended to help students further develop and refine their writing, researching, and analytical skills, through the application of these skills to various rhetorical situations. To achieve these goals, students will be expected to develop their ability to present their views in an organized, unified, and coherent manner to diverse audiences. Prerequisite: English Composition Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 34 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS G328 Human Uses of the Environment 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an in-depth exploration of the integrated relationship between human life and the surrounding environment, beginning with a study of the fundamental concepts and principles of ecology. Topics that are interwoven throughout the course include principles of ecology as seen in the structure and function of the ecosystem; pollution of air, soil, and water resources; population explosion and the relationship of people, disease, and food production; and environmental controls necessary for survival. Prerequisite: none G330 American Literature 40 hours, 4 credits This course surveys authors, genres, and movements in American literature from 1865 to the present, including representative works of Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and PostModernism/Post-Structuralism. Students will engage in critical readings of exemplary literary texts from a diverse group of authors that have influenced American literature since the Civil War. Students will analyze how these works of literature exemplify particular historical moments in U.S. history, as well as how they communicate pertinent cultural issues such as gender, race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexual identity, community, region, and nation. In their study of the broad range of American fiction, poetry, and drama since 1865, students will analyze literary, aesthetic, and critical developments. Prerequisite: English Composition, Introduction to Literature G332 Visual Communication in the Media 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines how people understand their world through visual images. Students will examine how people visually gather, process, and interpret information presented through media sources. Prerequisite: none G333 American Religious History 40 hours, 4 credits In this course students will be presented with an historical inquiry into the ideological origins and social context of American religious life. The importance of religion in the settlement of America and its role throughout American history will be explored and analyzed. Discussions of various historical and contemporary and emerging religious movements will also be discussed. Prerequisite: none G335 Contemporary World Literature: 1900 to the Present 40 hours, 4 credits This course explores how authors from around the world have engaged with important themes and historical events throughout the twentieth century. In studying these texts, students will examine the interplay of fiction and history, the varieties of literary style, and the qualities that link as well as distinguish works from different cultures. Students will respond to texts critically in discussion and essays, as well as research critical evaluations of literary topics, authors, etc. Prerequisite: English Composition G380 Visions of America Since 1945 40 hours, 4 credits Since the end of World War II, popular culture has become an especially significant aspect of American history and an important element in many of our lives. Consequently, this course will explore the ways in which popular culture has represented and mediated conflicts and tensions post-World War II. Through this lens, issues of gender and family relationships, as well as class and racial politics, will be discussed. The dual role of television as a reflective and manipulative force in the new suburban family and the role Hollywood films played in the popular culture will be examined. Prerequisite: None G401 Comparative Politics 40 hours, 4 credits This course will introduce students to the field of comparative politics by examining classification of political systems according to institutional and developmental characteristics Causes and costs of political stability and instability will be explored. Comparison will be made between contemporary political institutions and processes in various countries. Prerequisite: Contemporary U.S. Government G434 Gender in Math and Science 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the personal and collective educational experiences, career paths, and discoveries of female researchers, teachers, and practitioners in the fields of mathematics and science. Prerequisite: none G435 Literature of American Minorities 40 hours, 4 credits This course introduces students to a variety of texts by American minority authors from the mid-19th century to the present. The central focus of this course will be on literary responses to social marginalization based on race/ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexuality/sexual orientation, ability, and other factors. Students will study the effects of exclusionary and oppressive practices, both historical and present day, on writers’ perceptions and literary representations of their times, contexts, and identity. Students will also be introduced to samples of the most common critical-theoretical approaches to the primary texts they will study in this class Prerequisite: English Composition HS100 Introduction to Human Services 40 hours, 4 credits Introduction to Human Services exposes the student to the many facets of human services work. Topics to be explored include programs, policies, history, politics, and how current economics shape programs. Human service intervention strategies utilized in daily practice are examined along with stresses faced in the workplace. Comparisons of human services systems from a variety of countries will also be examined. Prerequisite: none HS110 Cultural Diversity in Human Services 40 hours, 4 credits This course will examine diversity in many communities and the cross-cultural service delivery available in those communities. Specific client populations will be explored, with an understanding of what cultural, physical, and mental diversity is and why it is important. Special attention will be paid to working with people of both mental and physical disabilities. Those disabilities include, but are not limited to, mental retardation, autism, and Asperger’s Syndrome. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Services HS115 Introductory Strategies to Crisis Intervention in Human Services 40 hours, 4 credits This course sets the foundation for students to develop the morals, ethics, and attitude necessary to strategically help those in crisis situations. The values and ethics intrinsic to the human services profession will be explored, as well as developing interpersonal communication skills. Students will explore how human services professionals function as change agents and must therefore attain and develop a core of intervention knowledge, theory, and skills to effectively deal with people in crisis. The ability to create genuine and empathetic relationships with others is central to those entering the human services field. Intervention strategies are also explored. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Services HS250 Organization and Leadership in Human Services 40 hours, 4 credits Working and managing within a human services organization takes high morals, standards, and ethics. Through this course, students will consider the complexity of moral and ethical dilemmas in navigating and managing in the human service industry. Students will learn decision-making techniques to include the necessary components for an ethical reasoning process. In order to have a strong foundation of practice, students will learn to how to build a strong ethical organization through culture, climate, and structure. Prerequisite: Case Management, Counseling Clients HS260 Community Psychology 40 hours, 4 credits Community Psychology focuses on the four systems which function in a community: the mental health system, the educational system, the criminal justice system, and the social service system. As human service professionals, students will analyze problems in these communities and will evaluate individuals functioning in these systems, offering both answers and proactive models of prevention. Community psychology works toward the empowerment of members within a community, while appreciating diversity and understanding human behavior. Social change will be examined as well as understanding that setting or environment is as important as the individual in it. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology HS280 Abnormal Psychology 40 hours, 4 credits In this course students will understand the applied discipline of abnormal psychology. In order to understand and change abnormal patterns of functioning humans in their communities, thoughts and behavior will be examined. Students will explore what is abnormal behavior and what is not in current society and cultures. Numerous applications will be examined, including a variety of mental health disorders, individuals who have difficulty functioning effectively in everyday life, the impact of family dysfunction on the individual, and the influence of mental illness on criminal behavior. Variables that may affect a person’s ability to adapt and function in a community will be considered, such as one’s genetic makeup, physical condition, learning, reasoning, and socialization. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology HS290 Human Services Internship 260 hours, 9 credits Field experience is a key learning experience in a human services delivery organization. It is a process of experiential learning that integrates the knowledge, theory, skills, and professional behaviors that are concurrently being taught within the classroom. It is an integral part of the total educational process. Prerequisite: Students must be in their last or second to last quarter before graduation. J100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 40 hours, 4 credits An introductory course designed to familiarize students with the facets of the criminal justice system, the sub-systems and how they interrelate. Students are introduced to various legal concepts especially the structure and operation of America’s court systems. Co-requisite: Criminology J102 Criminology 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the social and behavioral issues involved in the study of crime as a social phenomenon. Included is an explanation of what crime is, what causes crime, and the various techniques for measuring the amounts and characteristics of crime and criminals. Co-requisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J115 Introduction to Corrections 40 hours, 4 credits A general overview of U.S. corrections, jails and prisons, institutional procedures and recent innovations in offender treatment. Students are introduced to correctional philosophies, practices and procedures. The concepts of retribution and rehabilitation are examined. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J116 Case Management* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will learn how to manage caseloads of clients, document casework, and use strategies for clients’ rehabilitation. They will learn how to write effective court reports, case entries, recommendations and violation summaries. Students will explore clientinterview skills and motivation techniques. Examination of special populations of diverse clients, such as substance abusers and the mentally ill are reviewed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J120 Policing in America 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine the theoretical underpinnings of police work in the United States, including its historical roots, its current status, and the trends that will shape its future. They will explore the problems and solutions facing citizens, patrol officers, administrators, and agencies. They will also cover contemporary practices such as Community Oriented Policing, Problem Oriented Policing, and Directed Patrol. In investigating these topics, student will develop skills in critical thinking and problem solving. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (or co-requisite) Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 35 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS J122 Crime Scene to Conviction: Critical Skills in Documentation* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will master the skills of both oral and written communication. They will examine grammar and the mechanics of writing. They will also explore special communication issues, such as communicating with crime victims. They will develop skills for proper report writing, including such documents as search warrants, police reports, and case documents. Students will evaluate the impact of proper report writing, communication, and documentation on the outcome of legal proceedings, and review the importance of effectively translating written work into courtroom testimony. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J125 Criminal Law and Procedures 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an examination of substantive and procedural criminal law. Students are introduced to the Federal and State courts systems. The concepts of evidence sufficiency, standards of proof, and due process are explored. Statutory defenses, mitigating factors and circumstances which may excuse criminal responsibility, and common law principles are examined. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice. J130 Introduction to Homeland Security* 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides an introduction to the philosophical, historical, and multidisciplinary challenges of Homeland Security in combating terrorism. This course includes a review of the driving forces that resulted in the creation of the current Department of Homeland Security. This will be accomplished through a review of the field of homeland security, its evolution and critical issues, and an examination of current threats and vulnerabilities. The course also looks at the complexities of defining the roles of federal, state, local government, and the private sector. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J160 Introduction to Forensic Science* 40 hours, 4 credits A course designed to familiarize students with the application of science to criminal and civil laws. Students are introduced to the five basic services that a crime laboratory supports; examine the analysis of evidence and the collection and preservation of all types of evidence. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J200 Domestic Violence 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines violence in the family; social and legal relations within families; theories and solutions on family violence; survivors and the consequences of victimization; legal responses; the role of the police; when law enforcement responds; recognizing child abuse; recognizing elder abuse; associated crimes and stalking and domestic homicide. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J205 Juvenile Justice 40 hours, 4 credits An overview of the juvenile justice system including the nature and extent of delinquency, explanatory models and theories, the juvenile justice system, juvenile court practices and procedures. The role of law enforcement and juvenile correctional officer will be explored as well as juvenile training schools, probation and aftercare treatment. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J211 Counseling Clients* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine the process and effects of counseling. Assessment tools, methods of evaluation, and case plans are explored. They will consider a variety of counseling settings, including prisons, jails, group homes, in-patient and outpatient treatment centers, and halfway houses, as places of rehabilitation and counseling. Students will explore diverse clients including juveniles and adults, men and women, and people from various cultures. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J212 Legal Principles in Corrections* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine constitutional amendments regarding correctional management in various settings. They will explore concepts of offenders’ rights, officer professionalism, best practices, and proper operational procedures in a correctional setting. They will review principles as applied to special populations of offenders. Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Procedures J222 Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine how principles of psychology relate to law-enforcement work. They will explore fundamental concepts from a policing perspective, focusing on the realworld effects these principles produce on peace officers, their families, and the citizens they serve. Students will apply ideas from psychology to create effective victim- and witness-interviewing strategies, offender behavior-modification approaches, and officer coping methods. They will review the shortand long-term physiological and psychological effects of stress, trauma, and occupational experiences unique to the profession. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice, J226 Legal Code for Law Enforcement* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will use states’ criminal and traffic codes to become familiar with law and statutes. They will review penal statutes covering issues from homicide to misconduct, and will examine legislation and statutes that govern law-enforcement duties and responsibilities. Students will also examine laws and procedures that apply to specific populations like juveniles and domestic-violence victims. Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Procedures J230 Terrorism* 40 hours, 4 credits Students in this course will receive an indepth overview of terrorism, both domestic and international. (This course is designed to provide students the necessary skills to recognize acts of terrorism and gain insight into terrorists’ perceptions and motivations.) The course will touch on the causes and motives that drive terrorists, their methods of operation, and the impact of terrorism on the United States and abroad. Students will examine the necessary effort of planning preparedness within the governmental regulatory framework. Students will come to understand and appreciate the complexities of community and national disaster relief procedures, including combating weapons of mass destruction and cyber-terrorism. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J245 Security Challenges* 40 hours, 4 credits This course is an examination of the field of security and the security challenges faced in the current world situation. Both public and private security issues will be evaluated based on organization, law, and risk. Defense basics will be explored internally and externally. Specific threats to transportation, cargo, and information from terrorism will be reviewed. This course concludes with a critical look at the future of security. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J250 Drugs and Crime 40 hours, 4 credits The course will focus on the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects of drug and alcohol abuse. Treatment and prevention of abuse will be explored. In addition, policy implications of drug use and the criminal justice system response will be analyzed. An overview of the theories of use, drug business, and drug law enforcement will be explored. Such recent developments as “club drugs,” inhalants, herbal stimulants, and designer drugs will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J255 Ethics in Criminal Justice 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides a strong theoretical foundation for solving ethical dilemmas. Students will gain a realistic picture not only of what ethical questions arise in criminal justice, but also of how sound moral decisions are made in response to them. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice J260 Introduction to Investigations* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will become familiar with the fundamentals of criminal investigation, including the process and responsibilities of investigations. They will examine property and person-to-person crimes, with a special focus on writing skills and the management of an investigation. Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Procedures J261 Crime Scene Analysis* 40 hours, 4 credits Students will learn the process and function of securing and working a crime scene. They will become familiar with different types of evidence, including trace, biological, and impression evidence. They will examine the proper collection and documentation of evidence from a crime scene. Prerequisite: Introduction to Forensic Science J280 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Capstone* 40 hours, 4 credits The capstone class examines the future of the criminal justice system. The current cutting edge technology in different fields within the criminal justice system is discussed along with insights from accomplished scholars of what the near future holds. Methods and philosophies that will govern the criminal justice field in the near future are introduced along with discussions of the ethical, legal, social, and political ramifications expected. This course includes ten hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice. Students must be enrolled in the Criminal Justice program and in their last or second to last quarter. LA125 Law I 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of the fundamentals of law. This includes study of the American legal system, forms of conflict resolution, torts, contracts, and criminal law. Prerequisite: none LA130 State and Local Government 40 hours, 4 credits This course will introduce the constitutional interrelationship of national, state, and local governments. Special emphasis will be placed on the powers and functions of the various branches of state and local governments. Prerequisite: none LA225 Law II 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a continuation of the study of fundamentals of law. This includes study of the types of business organizations, property laws, wills, trusts, estate planning, bankruptcy, creditor and debtor relationships, commercial paper, contracts, and other areas of business law. Prerequisite: Law I LE200 Traffic Enforcement 40 hours, 3 credits Students will learn the skills for legal, effective, and safe traffic enforcement on city streets and major thoroughfares. They will examine implications of traffic codes and relevant court decisions through practical application. They will explore criminal and drug interdiction strategies through effective traffic enforcement, and special considerations in impaired driver enforcement. They will learn to operate enforcement tools such as speed detection devices and alcohol sensory equipment. Students will examine the writing and articulation of enforcement decisions, and potential court outcomes of enforcement actions. Prerequisites: Ethics in Criminal Justice, Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement LE211 Firearms I 40 hours, 2 credits Students will learn the fundamental principles of marksmanship for firearms competency, and will progress to police-specific skills needed for proficiency in firearms use. They will practice the care and maintenance of firearms. Prerequisites: Ethics in Criminal Justice, Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement LE212 Firearms II 40 hours, 2 credits Students will build upon fundamental principles of marksmanship to gain firearms skills unique to law enforcement and officer survival. They will examine considerations related to use of force and deadly force, focusing on decisionmaking in force levels and articulation of force decisions. They will implement tactical considerations throughout training, including combat firearms skills and mental preparation for use of deadly force. Students will experience scenario-based and simulation training to help them synthesize shooting skills with proper useof-force decisions in real-time situations. Prerequisite: Firearms I LE221 Defensive Tactics I 40 hours, 2 credits Students will learn fundamental fighting principles, including technical and psychological aspects of physical combat. They will use tactical positioning, command presence, verbalization skills, and interpretation of body language in confrontational situations. They will learn compliance and control techniques will be taught, ranging from empty-hand techniques, ground defense, and weapon retention to application of common police officer tools such as handcuffs, chemicals, batons, and electronic control devices. They will explore concepts of physical fitness and mental survival. Prerequisites: Ethics in Criminal Justice, Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 36 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS LE222 Defensive Tactics II 40 hours, 2 credits Students will build on fundamental police defensive tactics to synthesize physical knowledge with use-of-force decisionmaking. They will learn decision-making skills in ambiguous use-of-force incidents, demonstrating their ability to assess situations, respond appropriately, apply reasonable force, and articulate their reasoning. They will use practical application exercises and scenariobased training to maximize training effects. Prerequisite: Defensive Tactics I LE230 Police Investigation Process 60 hours, 3 credits Students will examine the investigation processes for crime scenes and crashes. They will explore issues of scene security, evidence collection, handling, and processing, and documentation. They will discuss legal issues of crime scene processing, and review basic investigation and reporting forms and the reporting requirements established by statute and policy. Prerequisites: Ethics in Criminal Justice, Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement LE240 Minnesota Traffic Code 20 hours, 2 credits Students will explore motor vehicle laws and statutes related to traffic enforcement in Minnesota. They will examine rules pertaining to driving, equipment, motor vehicle insurance, and driver licensing. They will identify unique circumstances and vehicles in traffic law, including commercial motor vehicles, implements of husbandry, boats, and all-terrain vehicles. Students will also review alcohol and drugs impairments to driving, and enforcement of related laws. Prerequisite: none LE245 Minnesota Criminal Code 20 hours, 2 credits Students will examine Minnesota criminal code and related statutes to gain a thorough understanding of peace officer responsibilities under Minnesota law. They will review specific Minnesota crimes and their elements, levels of offense, and the proper handling of suspects involved in various crimes. They will also explore charging, defenses, and sentencing will also be explored. Prerequisite: none LE280 Patrol Practicals with Pursuit Driving 80 hours, 4 credits Students will synthesize learning from all areas of training. They will respond to realistic calls for service and apply their knowledge of law enforcement to achieve resolution of a variety of common policing scenarios. They will discuss fire, arson, and explosives response. They will learn principles of good judgment and decisionmaking, and will articulate their enforcement choices and the potential legal implications of each. Students will also learn fundamental driving principles for routine and high-speed pursuit driving, and will apply these principles in laboratory exercises. They will discuss the legal and policy aspects of police pursuits and effective call response. Prerequisites: Ethics in Criminal Justice, Practical Psychology for Law Enforcement LE290 Law Enforcement Capstone 20 hours, 2 credits Students will examine the future of law enforcement by reviewing the topical areas of law enforcement required for success in the field. They will discuss current employment opportunities, certification requirements, and application and hiring processes. They will review specialty areas for successful certification and licensing, and discuss the potential ethical, legal, social, and political ramifications for the future. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement program and in their last or second to last quarter. M120 Medical Terminology* 40 hours, 4 credits This is a basic medical vocabulary-building course. An emphasis will be placed on the most common medical terms based on prefixes and suffixes, Latin and Greek origins, and anatomic roots denoting body structures. All body systems will be covered with a focus on word parts, terms built from word parts, abbreviations, and basic disease and surgical terms. Students will be expected to focus on spelling and pronunciation. Prerequisite: none M140 Basic ICD-9-CM Coding 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides in-depth study of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) using sample exercises and medical records to develop skill and accuracy in coding in various health care settings. Students will apply ICD-9-CM coding guidelines appropriate to the coding situation and will cover coding of all body systems. Prerequisite: Medical Terminology, Pathology I (prerequisite or corequisite) M140A Intermediate ICD-9-CM Coding 40 hours, 3 credits This course is a continuation of Basic ICD9-CM with developmental practice to increase proficiency in coding with ICD-9-CM using patient records. Students will apply official coding guidelines and knowledge of commonly accepted payment methodologies to medical record coding. Use of coding and grouper software will be introduced as well as the use of registries and indices. Prerequisite: Basic ICD-9-CM Coding M141 Ambulatory Care Coding 40 hours, 3 credits The emphasis in this course is medical coding in an ambulatory care setting. Students will develop an understanding of HCPCS coding with an emphasis on CPT. Prerequisite: Intermediate ICD-9-CM Coding M200 Medical Office Procedures 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the administrative duties performed in the medical office. Concepts covered include: preparing, filing and maintaining medical records; knowledge of the various types of health insurance coverage, coding and reimbursement; confidentiality and guidelines for releasing health information; and effective oral and written communication skills. Prerequisite: Medical Terminology M205 Medical Transcription I* 40 hours, 3 credits The student will transcribe medical histories, physical examination and other medical reports from transcription tapes and will apply knowledge of medical terminology, anatomy, and physiology to the transcription process. Emphasis is on correct use of medical terminology and accurate spelling of medical terms. Prerequisites: Medical Terminology, Keyboarding I M206 Medical Transcription II* 40 hours, 3 credits A continuation of Medical Transcription I, this course will build transcription skill while introducing students to additional medical formats and specialties, including cardiology, gastrointestinal, orthopedics, general pathology, and selected specialty options. The course includes transcription from tapes of health care professionals who are non-native speakers of English. Prerequisite: Medical Transcription I M207 Medical Transcription III* 40 hours, 3 credits A continuation of Medical Transcription II, this course will build transcription skill while introducing students to additional medical formats and specialties, including cardiology, gastrointestinal, orthopedics, general pathology, and selected specialty options. The course includes transcription from CD of health care professionals who are non-native speakers of English and operative reports Prerequisite: Medical Transcription II. M208 Introduction to Health Information Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course introduces the student to the history of the profession of the health information technician and the management of health information. Students learn about the organization of health care facilities, the members of the health care team who contribute to and use health information, and trends in the management of health care records. Students will learn about the format and content of medical records, and develop a beginning knowledge of the organization and storage of health information. Prerequisite: none M209 Medical Insurance and Billing 40 hours, 3 credits In this course students will receive an introduction to common 3rd party payers, insurance terminology, and medical billing. They will learn skills including claim forms preparation and processing, and electronic claim submission, and will review introductory medical coding. They will also examine plan options, payer requirements, state and federal regulations, and abstracting of source documents. Prerequisite: Medical Terminology M211 Quality Analysis and Management 40 hours, 4 credits This course covers quality improvement methodologies used in acute and long term care, and the quality issues of health information services. This course includes data collection and compilation of health care statistics. Prerequisite: Introduction to Health Information Management M218 Management of Health Information Services 40 hours, 4 credits The study of management, supervision, and human resource principles with application to health information service departments in various health care settings. Students will learn how to measure and manage productivity of HIM staff and explore the HIM management role in relation to other hospital departments. Prerequisite: Introduction to Health Information Management (or co-requisite) M223 Pathology I 40 hours, 4 credits Students will learn basic concepts and terminology related to diseases and disorders of the human body. Focus is on the structure, nature, causes, diagnostic procedures, pharmacology and treatment of common diseases of selected human body systems. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or Structure and Function of the Human Body M224 Pathology II 40 hours, 4 credits Continuation of studies of the basic concepts and terminology related to diseases and disorders of the human body. Focus is on the structure, nature, causes, diagnostic procedures, pharmacology, and treatment and prevention of common diseases of selected human body systems. Prerequisite: Pathology I M229 Healthcare Information Technologies 40 hours, 4 credits This course covers the elements of the electronic health record planning and implementation process as well as the ongoing management of systems. It provides a solid background about EHR history, trends, and common challenges. Students will also explore technology and software applications in various healthcare disciplines. Prerequisites: Introduction to Health Information Management, Computer Information Systems M230 Medical Law and Ethics 40 hours, 4 credits A study of the United States legal system and court process with emphasis on legal and ethical issues within the health care environment. Fraud and abuse, patient privacy and confidentiality, and professional practice law and ethics will be covered. The course will include a project that is specific to the student’s program of study. Prerequisite: none M251 Medical Coding Practicum* 30 hours, 1 credit This course offers supervised practical experience in a simulated campus or online setting, or a health care facility arranged by the student, with a minimum of 30 hours of practical experience in medical coding under the direction of a college HIT/Coding instructor or practicing medical coding professional. The practicum offers the student experience as a medical coder using actual or simulated medical documentation, and is essential to training. Prerequisite: Ambulatory Care Coding Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 37 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS M252 Health Information Practicum* 60 hours, 2 credits A simulated practical experience exploring a virtual hospital and clinic and using software and practical simulation assignments to experience real-world situations within HIM departments and other hospital departments. The practicum allows students to gain experience as a health information technician in a simulated healthcare work setting, and is essential to training and certification. Prerequisites: Medical Law and Ethics, Healthcare Information Technologies, Quality Analysis and Management M280 Medical Transcription Capstone* 50 hours, 3 credits A supervised experience in medical transcription work settings, simulated lab, and student assignments and presentations that demonstrate competency and understanding of the medical transcription field. Studentplanned field trips will be required. Students will transcribe actual medical dictation and be evaluated by the instructor on transcription accuracy, productivity, and professional/ethical conduct. The Capstone is intended to integrate course learning through practical experience in a workplace or simulated setting. Prerequisite: Medical Transcription II M290 Medical Administration Capstone* 10 hours, 1 credit This capstone class is designed to allow students to integrate the information and skills learned in the Medical Administration program. Students will complete a capstone project that incorporates coding, transcription, administrative, and medical office management skills. Prerequisite: Medical Administration student in last or second-to-last quarter. MA110 Clinical Skills I 60 hours, 4 credits In this course students will begin their study of the essential and basic core of back-office medical-assisting skills. They will learn the basics of the medical-assisting profession, and will master knowledge and skills including communication and technology, office procedures, medical law and ethics, records management, bookkeeping and billing, health insurance and coding, infection control, and patient assessment. They will follow appliedlearning approaches to all skill-development and performance objectives. Prerequisites: Medical Terminology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I MA135 Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professional 40 hours, 4 credits Students in this course will learn the pharmacology concepts necessary for a variety of allied-health programs. They will study drugs according to their therapeutic applications. They will examine pertinent physiology and related diseases before discussing the pharmacology of the drug. Students will also learn basic regulations that apply to drugs. Prerequisites: Medical Terminology; Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or Structure and Function of the Human Body MA145 Clinical Skills II 60 hours, 4 credits Students will continue their study of the essential and basic core of back-office medical assisting skills. They will master knowledge and skills including patient examination and assessment, minor surgical procedures, pharmacology, procedures for medical emergencies, first aid and CPR, and behaviors influencing health. They will also learn basic steps for finding employment and advancing in their careers. Students will follow appliedlearning approaches to all skill-development and performance objectives. Prerequisite: Clinical Skills I MA225 Laboratory Skills for Medical Assisting 60 hours, 4 credits In this course students will study medical laboratory procedures and techniques that are significant to medical and laboratory assistants and other healthcare professionals. They will learn about laboratory equipment and safety, and issues of patient confidentiality. They will learn to collect specimen samples, and to perform laboratory procedures including urinalysis and hematology, chemistry, immunology, and microbiology testing. Prerequisites: Clinical Skills II (or co-requisite) MA230 Medical Assistant Externship 180 hours, 6 credits Students will engage in an 11-week on-thejob training experience in a physician’s office/ clinic in their field of study or medical-specialty interest. The extern will perform medicalassisting job duties in both the front-office administrative area and the back-office clinical area, in order to develop on-the-job learning skills. Under no circumstances will the student extern receive pay for the externship hours worked. In the lecture portion of the course, students will learn job-search techniques and skills for entry-level medical assistants. Prerequisites: Laboratory Skills for Medical Assisting; approval of Medical Assisting Program Coordinator MA241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 80 hours, 5 credits In this course students will begin their study of the structure and function of the human body. They will examine topics including basic chemistry and cell biology, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems of the body, and will learn medical terminology is emphasized. Students will complete laboratory exercises coordinated with course content and including microscopic observation, experimentation, study of anatomical models, and dissection activities. Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Biology MA242 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 80 hours, 5 credits In this course, students will continue their study of human anatomy and physiology begun in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. They will examine the circulatory, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems, as well as fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, and nutrition and metabolism. Students will complete laboratory exercises coordinated with course content and including microscopic observation, experimentation, study of anatomical models, and dissection activities. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I ML100 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science 40 hours, 3 credits An introduction to laboratory medicine and the profession of clinical laboratory science. This course will emphasize professionalism, laboratory safety, and routine laboratory procedures including quality control and lab math. Prerequisite: Program admission ML150 Clinical Chemistry I 40 hours, 3 credits An introduction to analytical techniques, instrumentation, and basic principles of clinical chemistry methods. Presents the theory and application of biochemical analytes, including clinical significance and normal reference ranges. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I Co-requisite: College Algebra ML151 Hematology I 40 hours, 3 credits Introduction to the theory and practical application of routine and special hematology procedures. Presents red-blood-cell function, hematopoeisis, and associated diseases. The student laboratory focuses on identifying normal and abnormal red-blood-cell morphology and the evaluation of stained blood smears. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ML152 Urinalysis 40 hours, 3 credits An introduction to urinalysis and body-fluid analysis. Includes anatomy and physiology of the kidney, and physical, chemical, and microscopic analysis of urine, cerebral spinal fluid, and other body fluids. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ML153 Clinical Microbiology I 40 hours, 3 credits This course will include basic concepts of microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on cell structure and function of human, pathogenic microorganisms. Disease, resistance and immune system function will be included. Methods of microbe control will be introduced. A student laboratory will be utilized for experiences in fundamental microbiology techniques. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ML201 Clinical Chemistry II 60 hours, 4 credits Expanding upon concepts learned in Clinical Chemistry I, this course further examines the principles and procedures of various tests performed in Clinical Chemistry. Integral to this course is continued explanation of the physiological basis for the test, the principle and procedure for the test, and the clinical significance of the test results, including quality control and normal values. Prerequisite: Clinical Chemistry I ML202 Hematology II 60 hours, 4 credits Expanding upon concepts learned in Hematology I, this course further examines the theory and practical application of routine and special hematology procedures. Presents white blood cell function, hematopoeisis and associated diseases. The student laboratory focuses on identifying normal and abnormal white blood cell morphology and the evaluation of stained blood smears. Coagulation principles and techniques will be included. Prerequisite: Hematology I ML203 Immunology 40 hours, 3 credits Basic immunology and serology concepts will be presented with an emphasis on selected infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders. The theory of immunologic and serologic procedures will also be presented. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I ML205 Immunohematology 40 hours, 3 credits An introduction to the fundamentals of the immune system and the principles of genetics as they apply to blood group inheritance and blood banking procedures. Includes donor selection, blood collection, blood component processing and administration of blood components. Utilizes a student laboratory for experiences in routine blood banking procedures. Prerequisites: Hematology I, Immunology ML206 Clinical Microbiology II 60 hours, 4 credits Expanding on concepts learned in Clinical Microbiology I, this course provides further instruction in basic microbiology with emphasis placed on viruses, fungi and parasites. Epidemiology and infection control will be introduced. A student laboratory will be utilized for experiences in fundamental microbiology techniques. Prerequisite: Clinical Microbiology I ML291 Clinical Practicum I 360 hours, 12 credits Students will perform in supervised clinical rotations of the clinical chemistry, microbiology, urinalysis, hematology, blood bank, phlebotomy, and specimen-collection departments of the clinical affiliate. Prerequisite: Approval by campus coordinator; completion of all coursework required by clinical affiliate. ML292 Clinical Practicum II 360 hours, 12 credits Students will continue in supervised clinical rotations of the clinical chemistry, microbiology, urinalysis, hematology, blood bank, phlebotomy, and specimen-collection departments of the clinical affiliate. Prerequisite: Clinical Practicum I MT101 Introduction to Massage Therapy 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces basic massage therapy skills and knowledge necessary to becoming a massage therapist. Students will acquire the knowledge to develop a self care strategy by identifying body awareness and movement habits. Prerequisite: none Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 38 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS MT105 Deep Tissue Massage 40 hours, 3 credits This course will incorporate and expand on the techniques learned from Swedish massage. An emphasis will be on other methods of addressing soft tissue dysfunction. Students will have the knowledge to integrate deep tissue massage into their practice as a massage therapist. An emphasis will be upon developing communication and documentation skills for insurance billing. Prerequisites: Introduction to Massage Therapy, Kinesiology MT120 Techniques for Special Clients 40 hours, 3 credits This is a basic course focusing on clients who have individualized needs. The emphasis in this course is on pregnancy, infant, pediatric, and geriatric massage. Students will also gain an understanding of how to incorporate a massage environment that best serves individuals that have a physical and/or developmental challenge. Prerequisites: Introduction to Massage Therapy, Kinesiology MT140 Pathology for Massage Therapy 40 hours, 4 credits This course, which is intended as a general one-quarter overview of pathology for Massage Therapy and allied health students, will cover the most basic concepts and terminology of health and disease. Students will acquire the knowledge of different disorders. Focus is on the structure, nature, causes, diagnostic procedures, and treatment of the most common diseases of selected human body systems. Prerequisite: none MT215 Sports Massage 40 hours, 3 credits This course provides students with the knowledge of how to apply pre-event, immediate, post-event, and restorative massage. Students will have the knowledge of various injuries and the physiological effects that the body endures in athletic events. Students will have an understanding of different stretching applications to a client. Prerequisites: Introduction to Massage Therapy, Kinesiology MT220 Myofascial Release 40 hours, 3 credits The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge of Myofascial release. The student is introduced to working on fascia in the body. An emphasis will be on the emotional releases from the client and how to handle these situations in a session. Prerequisites: Introduction to Massage Therapy, Pathology for Massage Therapy, Human Anatomy and Physiology II, Kinesiology II MT225 Alternative Modalities 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces the basic knowledge of Shiatsu, Reflexology, and Aromatherapy. Students will have an understanding of the five element theory, meridians and chakras. The students will be able to incorporate principles of reflexology and aromatherapy into a massage session. Prerequisites: Introduction to Massage Therapy, Kinesiology MT230 Trigger Point Therapy 40 hours, 3 credits This course is an introduction to Trigger Point Therapy. Students will have the facts of scientific data of a Trigger Point. Students will have the knowledge of the physiological symptoms of a Trigger Point. An emphasis will be on the significance of musculoskeletal disorders and how to manage these with Trigger Point Therapy. Prerequisite: Deep Tissue Massage MT237 Clinic I 40 hours, 2 credits In this course the student will perform a minimum of 40 hours in the Massage Clinic, performing at least 15 full body massage treatments. A supervisor will be present to evaluate and guide the student’s performance. Students are evaluated on hands-on skills and SOAP Charting. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physiology II, Kinesiology II, Deep Tissue Massage MT238 Clinic II 80 hours, 4 credits In this course the student will perform a minimum of 80 hours in the Massage Clinic performing at least 30 full body massage treatments. A supervisor will be present to evaluate and guide the student’s performance. Students are evaluated on hands-on skills and SOAP Charting. Prerequisite: Clinic I. This course is recommended for a student’s last quarter. MT245 Kinesiology 40 hours, 4 credits This course is an introduction to the skeletal and muscular system. An emphasis is on the fascial system and movement of the body. The students will have a basic knowledge of kinesiology. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I MT246 Kinesiology II 50 hours, 4 credits The purpose of this course is to provide an in depth knowledge of muscular and skeletal systems and the relationship to movement. Students will learn the innervation and arterial supply of the head, neck, trunk, leg, arm, and pelvis. An emphasis on how muscles function with the structure of the body will be taught. In this course this a lab portion where students will be palpating muscles and the movement that partners with it. Prerequisite: Kinesiology MT250 Business and Wellness 40 hours, 3 credits This course prepares the student for the final steps into the world of work, including in-depth preparation and review for the National Certification Exam from the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The focus includes professional preparation for employment in the various venues that massage therapy is offered, and includes nutrition and wellness information to provide the student with a business, personal, and professional plan for their new career. Prerequisites: Deep Tissue Massage, Sports Massage. This course is recommended for the last quarter. N112 PC Hardware and Software I (A+) 40 hours, 3 credits In this course the students are introduced to the installation, configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting of personal computer hardware and the software used to support the hardware. The topics covered include; the relationship between computer hardware and software, the installation, support, and troubleshooting of system boards, memory, hard drives, multimedia, and input/output devices. To reinforce the material in this course the instructor will assign direct hands on projects to be performed in a lab setting. Each student will assemble a computer using prescribed parts and materials. Prerequisite: none N113 PC Hardware and Software II (A+) 40 hours, 3 credits This course is a continuation of PC Hardware and Software I. The topics covered include review of previously covered topics, telecommunications and networking, the Internet, and printing. Additional topics in this course are virus protection, disaster recovery and maintenance planning. Finally, the student will learn about the conduct and responsibilities of being a professional PC technician. To reinforce the materials in this course the instructor will assign direct hands-on projects to be performed in a lab setting. Further, this course in addition to the first course helps prepare students to take the A+ certification Core and DOS/Windows Exams. Prerequisite: PC Hardware and Software I (A+) N127 Microsoft Windows Workstations* 40 hours, 3 credits This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure a Windows Workstation. The course gives the student the ability to provide technical support to a Windows Workstation. This course uses a combination of lectures, demonstrations, discussions, online assignments, and hands-on labs to reinforce the course materials. Further, the course helps prepare students to take the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam. Prerequisite: none N133 Networking Fundamentals* 40 hours, 3 credits This course has been designed to teach the foundations of networking. The course covers Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks on how communications is accomplished in those environments. Students will learn the different Protocols used in networking. The course will cover the designing networks both cabled and wireless. Students will learn basic troubleshooting of a network and how to maintain it. To reinforce the material in this course the instructor will assign direct hands on projects to be performed in a lab setting. Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Workstations or adviser/faculty approval N141 Networking Security Fundamentals* 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces students to general security concepts including authentication methods, cryptography basics, and common network attacks and how to safeguard against them. Students will learn to create secure communications for remote access, e-mail, the Web, directory and file transfer, and wireless data. They will understand the concepts of physical security and disaster recovery. This course uses a combination of lectures, demonstrations, discussions, online assignments, and hands-on labs to reinforce the course materials. Prerequisite: Networking Fundamentals N164 Voice Over IP Fundamentals 40 hours, 3 credits The goal of this course is to introduce students to Voice over IP (VoIP) communications and the different features and benefits inherent in deploying communications in this way. Students will learn the differences inherent between Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) and VoIP systems. They will discover the signaling that is done with VoIP and learn about the configuration issues when switching over a system to VoIP. Prerequisite: Networking Fundamentals N208 Linux Administration* 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed for introduction of the Linux operating system. The students will learn to installation, configure, maintain, administration, and use programming features of Linux operating system. Students will learn how download and install source application from the Internet, running Windows emulation, and the role of Linux in the enterprise network environment. This courses uses a combination of reading, lecture, Internet based research, and lab work to reinforce the course materials. Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Workstations N226 Windows Active Directory* 40 hours, 3 credits The course will teach the concepts of utilizing Microsoft Windows Active Directory. Students will learn to install, setup, configure, utilize, maintain and trouble shoot Windows Active Directory. To reinforce the material in this course the instructor will assign direct hands on projects to be performed in a lab setting. Further this course helps prepare students to take the Microsoft Certification Exam #70-294 Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Server N228 Microsoft Windows Server* 40 hours, 3 credits This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Windows server and perform post-installation and day-to-day administrative tasks. The course gives the student the background needed to provide technical support for Windows Servers. This course uses a combination of lectures, demonstrations, discussions, online assignments, and hands-on labs to reinforce the material covered. Further, the course helps prepare students to take the Microsoft Professional Certification exam. Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Workstations N234 Microsoft Exchange Server* 40 hours, 3 credits In this course students will learn a wide range of information about Exchange Server, from installation, configuration, administration, troubleshooting, and maintenance. It introduces a variety of concepts, such as client configuration. In addition to explaining concepts, the course uses a multitude of realworld examples of networking and messaging issues. This course uses a combination of reading, lecture, and lab work to reinforce student learning. Further, this course helps prepare students to take Microsoft’s MCSE Exam #70-236. Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Server Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 39 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS N235 Cisco Networking Fundamentals and Routing* 40 hours, 3 credits In this course students will learn the skills necessary to deploy a new Cisco network or manage an existing network. The course provides a wide range of information, starting with a review of the basic building blocks of networks through advanced Cisco networking topic such as access control list, WAN connectivity, and virtual LANs. The lab assignments included in this course give students adequate hands-on experience with Cisco equipment, allowing them to gain confidence in working with live networks. This course uses a combination of reading, lecture, and lab work to reinforce student learning. Further this course helps prepare students to take Cisco CCNA Exam. Prerequisite: Networking Fundamentals N251 Introduction to Computer Forensics 40 hours, 3 credits This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of computer forensics and investigation tools and techniques. They learn what computer forensics and investigation is as a profession and gain an understanding of the overall investigative process. All major personal computer operating system architectures and disk structures are discussed. The student learns how to set up an investigator’s office and laboratory, what computer forensic hardware and software tools are available, the importance of digital evidence controls and how to process crime and incident scenes. Finally, they learn the details of data acquisition, computer forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing, and expert witness requirements. The course provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments that teach you about theory as well as the practical application of computer forensic investigation. Prerequisite: Microsoft Windows Server N252 Networking Security Advanced 40 hours, 3 credits This course takes an in depth look at network defense concepts and techniques. Students will examine the tools, techniques and technologies used in the securing of information assets. This course is designed to provide in-depth information on the software and hardware components of Information Security and Assurance. Topics covered include: intrusion detection, virtual private networks (VPN), and incident response strategies and planning. Further, this course helps students prepare to take the Security Certified Program, Network Defense and Countermeasures exam, SC0-402. Prerequisite: Cisco Networking Fundamentals and Routing N253 Managing Information Security 30 hours, 3 credits Information security is not only an IT, but a management issue. Therefore, this course introduces students to a detailed examination of the systems-wide perspective of information security. They begin with the strategic planning process for security, which includes an examination of the policies, procedures and staffing functions necessary to organize and administrate ongoing security functions in an organization. Course subjects include security practices, security architecture and models, continuity planning and disaster recovery planning. This course is one step in helping students prepare to take the CISSP certification exam. Prerequisite: Networking Security Advanced N264 IP Telephony 40 hours, 3 credits This course will serve as the foundation for learning Cisco Call Manager Express and Cisco Unity Express in different network configurations and environments. In this first of a two course sequence students will learn how to install and initially configure these two products in typical network environments. Students will also learn about the various phone options and features currently available to organizations implementing IP Telephony. Prerequisite: Voice Over IP Fundamentals N265 Quality of Service (QoS) 40 hours, 3 credits This course will look at how Quality of Service can affect not only IP-based applications running on a network but also general network performance. Various tools and procedures are introduced in this course for dealing with congestion, traffic policing and shaping, and utilizing drop policies where appropriate. In addition, there will be attention paid to the topic of QoS on the LAN, and why it is an important topic to consider and review for overall network performance. Prerequisite: IP Telephony N270 Oracle Database Administration 40 hours, 3 credits The goal of this course is to prepare individuals to work with and administer Oracle databases. Students will learn the various tools available to set up the database, query, configure performance monitoring, and enhance security for the Oracle database. The course will emphasize the skills needed for day-to-day maintenance of the database. Prerequisite: Database Design and SQL N271 SQL Server 2005 Administration 40 hours, 3 credits The goal of this course is to prepare individuals to work with and administer SQL Server 2005. Students will learn how to install and maintain SQL Server 2005 and also how to use various tools helpful in creating backups, promoting security, and to enhance availability and performance of the database. Prerequisite: Database Design and SQL N272 SQL Server 2005 Development 40 hours, 3 credits This course seeks to prepare the students for programming in the SQL Server 2005 environment. Students will learn how to manipulate and work with database objects through T-SQL to create and alter tables as needed. In addition, students taking this class will learn to modify queries, work with constraints, and deal with normalization issues as they learn to program in this environment. Prerequisite: SQL Server 2005 Administration N273 Business Intelligence Reporting 40 hours, 3 credits The goal of this course is to allow students to understand what business intelligence is and how it affects the success or failure of organizations. In particular, this course will focus on business intelligence using Crystal Reports as the basis for deriving this information. Prerequisite: SQL Server 2005 Administration N290 Information Technology Capstone* 20 hours, 2 credits This course summarizes key learning throughout the student’s program. Students apply what they’ve learned by solving a real-world programming problem. This problem-solving exercise encompasses timelines, deadlines, team-building, and communication issues. Prerequisite: This course is intended to be completed in the student’s last quarter. NM110 Drawing Design and Art Theory 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces the fundamentals of drawing through five elements of art (line, space, value, form and texture). A series of exercises and assignments focuses on various applications involving form, lighting, perspective, figure drawing and historical studies. Prerequisite: none NM111 Introduction to Computer Graphics 40 hours, 3 credits This course gives students an overveiw of desktop publishing and other graphic software that enables them to use the computer as a graphic design tool. Additional topics include file management, the Internet, basic keyboarding, and basic troubleshooting. Prerequisite: none NM113 Introduction to Multimedia and Computer Graphic Arts 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to provide the student an overview and exposure to the basic multimedia concepts and software. Students examine introductory theory and concepts of four tracks in multimedia: Web, Interactive, Video, and 3D. Preproduction of all multimedia elements are stressed throughout the class with an emphasis on trouble shooting and problem solving. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM115 Networking and Internet Technologies 40 hours, 3 credits The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to networking and Internet technologies. This course covers a wide range of material about the Internet, from using the Internet to demonstrating how the Internet works, using different Internet protocols, programming on the Internet, the Internet infrastructure, security, and e-commerce. It not only introduces a variety of concepts, but also discusses in-depth the most significant aspects of Internet, such as the OSI model of networking. In addition to explaining concepts, the course uses a multitude of real world examples of networking issues from a professional’s standpoint, making it a practical preparation for the real world. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM121 Typography 40 hours, 3 credits This course focuses on the fundamentals of typography and introduces the students to aspects of type for display and text design. Students become familiar with the categories of type and a variety of font families. They also become proficient at choosing fonts to match a specific message. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM122 Digital Publishing 40 hours, 3 credits This course utilizes techniques associated with designing computer graphics and page make-up for desktop publishing. Emphasis is on the exploration of illustration, photo retouching and manipulation, and working toward finished results primarily in printed form as well as web. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM124 Color Theory and Techniques 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces basic compositional principles of harmony and contrast through the practice of color applications, using felt tip markers, acrylic paints and markers. Basic exercises are introduced and practiced to learn how to achieve different product surfaces and create visual effectiveness. The use of color in printing also is explored. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM130 Audio/Video Editing 40 hours, 3 credits Students learn the theory and processes of audio/video editing using non-linear editing software on the desktop. Exercises in production and post-production techniques will be applied for various delivery media. Students produce and edit a series of short videos for video, disk and Internet applications. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM131 Introduction to 3D Arts and Animation 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces students to the fundamentals of 3-dimensional computer modeling and how it applies to a multimedia project. Using basic modeling techniques and utilizing texture, lighting, and environmental effects, students model and render 3-dimensional forms to create surreal and realistic images. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM141 Digital Media Production 40 hours, 3 credits This course is a study of the integration of components used in multimedia applications using authoring software. Students use industry-standard software as tools for producing interactive projects. Topics include basic animation techniques, special effects, transitions, and user interactivity. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM240 3-Dimensional Animation 40 hours, 3 credits Once students have learned the basics of 3D modeling and rendering, they will explore the fundamentals of animation and the more advanced methods of modeling and texturing. Students will create photo-realistic products and environments utilizing complex technical techniques and thorough creative design. Emphasis will be placed on detailed modeling and texture mapping complementing elementary 3D animation and story development. Prerequisite: Introduction to 3D Arts and Animation NM250 Dynamic Content Management 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces students to the standards for designing relational databases. The course focuses on record creation, modification, and deletion as well as report generation and database design. In addition, Structured Query Language is utilized to obtain dynamic information for multimedia authoring. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 40 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS NM252 Fundamentals of Web Authoring and Design 40 hours, 3 credits This course focuses on the students’ basic authoring skills by focusing on the demands, details, and subtleties of creating web pages. HTML and supplemental client side scripting are the primary focus of the course. In addition, processes of graphic and multimedia creation – adding interactivity, color use, file management and formats, testing, publishing, and publicizing are addressed. Students use interactivity and multimedia elements to enhance their site design. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics NM260 Server Side Scripting 40 hours, 3 credits This course focuses on dynamic interactive web sites from a multimedia perspective. Emphasis is on data driven pages, interactivity through client side scripting, dynamic web content and database access through server side scripting. Prerequisites: Dynamic Content Management, Fundamentals of Web Authoring and Design NM262 Digital Media Assembly 40 hours, 3 credits In this course, students will develop and apply scripts to control sprites, video, sound, and interactivity for informational and entertainment animations using authoring software. The project produced in this class will be available for use on CD-ROM. Prerequisite: Digital Media Production NM272 Multimedia Technologies 40 hours, 3 credits In this course students will learn aspects of advanced programming languages that allow for scripting of complex interactive applications for Internet delivery. Students will also explore the newest technologies and their impact on multimedia and visual design. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Graphics or Fundamentals of Programming NM280 Multimedia Portfolio Development* 20 hours, 2 credits In this course, students select a primary and secondary track to create an industry-quality portfolio consisting of enhanced and updated projects from previous classes as well as newly created projects. Students will create a final portfolio/demo tape using a consistent theme related to their identity package. Prerequisite: Multimedia Technologies student in last or second-to-last quarter. PB105 Phlebotomy 40 hours, 3 credits Skill development in the performance of a variety of blood collection methods using proper techniques and universal precautions. Includes vacuum collection devices, syringes, capillary skin punctures, butterfly needles, blood cultures and specimen collection on adults, children, and infants. Emphasis on infection prevention, proper patient identification, labeling of specimens and quality assurance, specimen handling, processing and accessioning. Utilizes a student laboratory for experiences in basic phlebotomy procedures. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Human Anatomy and Physiology I PL100 Introduction to Law and the Legal System 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine the American legal system from a variety of perspectives. They will survey topics including essential history, the working structure of government, issues of court procedure, and specific legal concepts. In addition, they will investigate the role of the paralegal in the legal system, and the impact of legal ethics on the paralegal. Paralegal students will gain a foundation for further paralegal study, and students from other disciplines will gain an appreciation of the legal system’s impact on their disciplines. Students will prepare a resume as part of this course. Prerequisite: none PL110 Introduction to Legal Research 40 hours, 4 credits Students will explore the legal research and writing process for paralegals. They will receive an overview of legal source materials and how and when to incorporate those materials into the legal research process. They will learn practices of case document management in law offices and the legal system. In addition, students will create proper reports and documents required in the legal process. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL121 Civil Litigation and Procedure I 40 hours, 4 credits Students will examine the lawyers and paralegals’ roles in handling civil cases and the means by which the objectives of litigation may be achieved. Strategy and mechanics of civil procedure will be explored in depth, and students will be required to prepare complaints, motions, and answers. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL122 Civil Litigation and Procedure II 40 hours, 4 credits Students will continue to develop and refine litigation skills. The course will focus on discovery, pre-trial procedure, trial procedure, post-trial procedure, and initial appellate documents. Prerequisite: Civil Litigation and Procedure I PL140 Contracts 40 hours, 4 credits This course will provide students with a practical approach to the law of contracts. The class discussions and assignments will include analyzing contracts, breach of contracts, and the remedies provided for a breach of contract. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL211 Legal Research and Writing I 40 hours, 4 credits After examining the sources of law and the structure of the federal and state court systems, students will be introduced to case and statutory analysis and to an understanding of the role of the paralegal in performing substantive legal analysis and writing tasks. They will learn how to analyze and synthesize written opinions and will complete three significant writing projects. Prerequisites: Introduction to Legal Research, English Composition PL212 Legal Research and Writing II 40 hours, 4 credits Students will continue to develop their writing and researching skills. Students will use the results of their research in connection with at least three (3) significant writing projects, qincluding memoranda of law. Prerequisite: Legal Research and Writing I PL215 Real Estate Law 40 hours, 4 credits This course provides the basic concepts of the law of real property enabling the student to perform connected duties in a law office, title company, or financial institution. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to prepare purchase and sales agreements, deeds, mortgages, closing statements with perorations and other real estate related documents. The student will have a working knowledge of title searches and a thorough understanding of closing procedures. The student will also become familiar with mortgage foreclosures, landlord/tenant law, and zoning regulations. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL216 Corporate Law 40 hours, 4 credits This course will provide students an overview of the formation, operation, and dissolution of the corporate entity. Stockholders rights and remedies as corporate owners will be examined. Corporate documents and corporate formalities will be discussed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL219 Law Office Technology 40 hours, 4 credits This course introduces students to the fundamentals of how to use computer technology to accomplish tasks performed by paralegals in a law office. Students will be introduced to and given the opportunity to utilize law oriented computer software applications. Students will be exposed to exercises designed to provide the skills utilized by paralegals in file management, time, and docket management and computer based legal research and document movement. Prerequisites: Introduction to Law and the Legal System, Computer Information Systems PL225 Torts 40 hours, 4 credits This course examines the fundamentals of tort law and provides a basic understanding of the principles of tort litigation. Through classroom discussions, projects and supervised library research, students will develop an overview of causes of actions in torts and their relevancy to the paralegal. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL230 Family Law 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to teach the student to handle client interviews, to draft necessary pleadings and supporting documents, and to perform research relative to the practice of family law and domestic relations matters. The student will develop an understanding of the law relating to marriage, cohabitation, divorce, annulment, custody and support, adoption, guardianship and paternity. Students will draft pleadings and documents including ante nuptial and property settlement agreements. Prerequisite: Introduction to Law and the Legal System PL290 Paralegal Internship 130 hours, 5 credits This course provides the student with the opportunity to gain practical work experience under the supervision of an attorney. The student must periodically submit written reports to the supervising instructor describing his/her experiences during the internship. The student is evaluated by his/her supervisor at the conclusion of the internship. Prerequisite: Final-quarter status and consent of program coordinator. PN100 Nursing Foundations 120 hours, 6 credits This introductory course is comprised of both a theory and a clinical component. Students are introduced to the concepts and nursing abilities required to meet basic human needs. Emphasis is placed on safety, psychomotor skills, therapeutic communication, and adult growth and development. The student must achieve a variety of nursing competencies to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: Program admission Co-requisites: Introduction to Pharmacology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I PN105 Nutrition and Diet Therapy 40 hours, 4 credits This course presents the basic principles and concepts of nutrients and their function. Content includes fundamentals of nutrition, relationship of nutrition in health maintenance throughout the lifespan, medical nutritional therapy, and current issues in nutrition. Prerequisite: none PN110 Introduction to Pharmacology 40 hours, 4 credits This course introduces basic concepts related to drug classification, drug action/interaction, therapeutic and adverse effects, and contraindications. The student gains basic proficiency in the use of problem-solving skills and mathematical calculations to determine drug dosage. This course presents a basic overview of pharmacology; subsequent coursework builds on this foundation. Prerequisite: none PN115 Nursing I 90 hours, 5 credits This course is an introduction to medical/ surgical nursing and is comprised of both a theory and clinical component. Content includes nursing documentation, medication administration, the nursing process, and transcultural considerations. Emphasis is placed on basic pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures, common treatment modalities, nursing interventions, and critical-thinking skills for patients with disorders of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Prerequisites: Nursing Foundations, Introduction to Pharmacology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I Co-requisite: Psychosocial Nursing PN120 Psychosocial Nursing 80 hours, 4 credits This course presents an overview of the underlying principles of psychiatric/mentalhealth nursing and how those concepts transcend practice settings; it is comprised of both a theory and clinical component. Content includes therapeutic interventions, pathophysiology, psychopharmacology, current therapies, and rehabilitation for the patient experiencing psychiatric/mentalhealth alterations. Emphasis is on therapeutic communication, patient-nurse boundaries, and holistic care. Prerequisite: Nursing Foundations Co-requisites: Nursing I, Introduction to Psychology Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 41 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS PN125 Nursing II 120 hours, 6 credits This course is a continuation of Nursing I and is comprised of both a theory and a clinical component. Content includes surgical care, fluid and electrolyte balance, pain management, and care environments. Emphasis is placed on basic pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures, common treatment modalities, nursing interventions, and criticalthinking skills for patients with disorders of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, urologic, and endocrine systems. Prerequisites: Nursing I, Psychosocial Nursing Co-requisites: Maternal-Child Nursing, Nutrition and Diet Therapy PN130 Maternal - Child Nursing 80 hours, 4 credits This course introduces maternal-child nursing and is comprised of both a theory and clinical component. Students explore concepts relevant to care of the obstetrical, newborn, and pediatric patient as well as sexuality and fertility issues. Emphasis is placed on family-centered care. Obstetrical content includes progression through pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum care including newborn and high-risk infant care. Pediatric content includes concepts of growth and development and fundamentals of health maintenance, health promotion, and disease prevention. Prerequisite: Nursing I Co-requisites: Nursing II, Nutrition and Diet Therapy PN135 Nursing III 120 hours, 6 credits This course is a continuation of Nursing II and is comprised of both theory and clinical components. Emphasis is placed on basic pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures, common treatment modalities, nursing interventions, and critical-thinking skills for patients with disorders of the digestive, blood, lymph, integument, immune, and neurological systems. Modalities of care across the healthcare system are discussed. Prerequisites: Nursing II, Maternal - Child Nursing, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Co-requisites: Nursing Seminar, Geriatric Nursing PN140 Geriatric Nursing 80 hours, 4 credits This course explores care for the older adult and is comprised of both a theory and clinical component. The content builds on previous learning experiences to incorporate a more in-depth study of the normal aging process to assure comprehensive nursing care for the older adult patient. Content will address the psychological, cultural, spiritual, legal, and ethical aspects related to geriatric nursing care. Prerequisites: Nursing II, Maternal - Child Nursing, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Co-requisites: Nursing III, Nursing Seminar PN145 Nursing Seminar 20 hours, 2 credits This course examines the role of the practical nurse. Content includes the history of nursing, practical nursing scope of practice, legal and ethical considerations, and NCLEX-PN review. Content is designed to facilitate transition from the role of student to the role of graduate practical nurse. Emphasis is placed on assuming personal accountability for nursing actions. The importance of participation in continuing educational activities is emphasized. Prerequisites: Nursing II, Maternal – Child Nursing, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Co-requisites: Nursing III, Geriatric Nursing PT105 Introduction to Pharmacy 40 hours, 4 credits An introduction to the technician’s role in pharmacy practice. The student will gain a basic knowledge of chemistry and become knowledgeable in correct use of CPR. Emphasis will be on patient profiles, receiving and interpreting drug orders, routes of administration, dosage forms, and brand versus generic drugs. The importance of accuracy will be addressed along with methods of avoiding medication errors. Prerequisite: none PT120 Pharmacy Math and Dosages 40 hours, 4 credits This course will provide the student with the necessary math skills to effectively work within a pharmacy setting. In addition to ratios and proportions, dosage calculations, and conversions, the student will develop knowledge and skills to perform business math functions related to retail pharmacy practice. Prerequisites: Introduction to Pharmacy (or co-requisite); College Algebra PT125 Pharmacy Software/ Automation/Insurance Billing 40 hours, 3 credits Hands-on experience using pharmacy software will be gained via entering patient profiles and prescriptions. The student will learn how to process prescriptions, understand common insurance rejection codes, and gain knowledge of how to solve rejections. Automated ordering, receiving, and maintenance of inventory will be addressed. Student will gain understanding of the various payment methods received by retail pharmacies. The student will explore various automation machines used within pharmacy settings. Prerequisite: Pharmacy Math and Dosages PT240 Unit Dose and Medication Preparation 40 hours, 3 credits In this course, the student will apply knowledge of medication charts and pharmacy math to correctly dispense and chart delivery of patient medications within an institutional setting. Emphasis is on correctly filling orders with correct drug, dosage, and frequency. The IV lab will stress aseptic techniques and the maintenance of sterile conditions. The student will learn to read an IV label, select appropriate additives and base solutions, and properly prepare the prescribed IV compound. Prerequisites: Introduction to Pharmacy, Pharmacy Math and Dosages PT280 Pharmacy Technician Capstone* 20 hours, 2 credits This course is an overview of all pharmacy technician program courses and concepts, with an emphasis on the reviewing and preparation of materials which comprise the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board examination. Prerequisites: Pharmacy Technician student in last or second-to-last quarter. R200 Principles of Retailing 40 hours, 4 credits This course is an overview of retail management, including organization, merchandising, retail sales, customer service, personnel management, and operations. Prerequisite: none S115 Keyboarding I* 40 hours, 3 credits This course introduces students to the keyboard and basic formatting for business documents. An objective of 25 wpm on five-minute timed writings with 5 or fewer errors is the course goal. Prerequisite: none S116 Keyboarding II* 40 hours, 3 credits This course is a production course with emphasis on document composition. Students will build upon skills gained in Keyboarding I and using their higher order thinking skills. This course will require student use of correct formatting in the creation of appropriate ethical and legally correct documents. An objective of 38 wpm on five-minute timed writings with 5 or fewer errors is the course goal. Prerequisite: Keyboarding I S120 Word for Windows* 40 hours, 3 credits This course is designed to investigate the advanced applications and concepts available in Microsoft Office Word. Students will be introduced to word processing features ranging from the creation of new documents to mail merge and web pages. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Word portion of the MOS certification exam. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems S150 Legal Office Procedures 40 hours, 4 credits This course is a study of the structure and functions of the law office. Included will be the theoretical and practical aspects of the practice of law. Students will study the legal office profession, communication and legal recordkeeping. Prerequisite: Office program student in last or second-to-last quarter. S172 Legal Terminology* 40 hours, 4 credits This course serves as a study of terms used in the legal profession. The course emphasizes spelling, pronunciation, definition, research and usage of legal terms that will be required for law office support personnel. Prerequisite: none S201 Office Procedures 40 hours, 4 credits This course is designed to familiarize students with the following office skills: human relations and ethics, mailing procedures, forms and documents commonly used in offices; bookkeeping and financial records; office machines; filing skills, and records management. Students will learn how an office is managed and how to ensure it is operating efficiently. Prerequisite: Office program student in last or second-to-last quarter. S219 Legal Document Processing and Transcription* 40 hours, 3 credits Students will transcribe correspondence, legal papers, and court documents representative of those prepared in a law office using templates and transcription equipment. Legal specialties will include litigation, family law, negligence, wills and estates and real estate Prerequisite: Keyboarding I ST102 Microbiology for Surgical Technologists 30 hours, 3 credits This course has been designed to educate the student in the treatment of the disease-causing organisms that may present with a surgical patient or develop post-surgery as an acquired infection. This course specifically addresses the needs of the surgical technologist in maintaining aseptic techniques and caring for surgical patients before, during, and after surgery. Prerequisites: Medical Terminology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ST105 Introduction to Surgical Technology 40 hours, 3 credits This course will introduce the student to the field of surgical technology and prepare them to become a part of the operating room team. Areas explored in this course are medical terminology for the operating room, introduction to microbiology, medical and surgical asepsis, operating room design, and surgical equipment, patient care, procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisites: Medical Terminology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I ST112 Surgical Procedures I 60 hours, 4 credits This course will orient the student to surgical technology and prepare them for scrub and circulator duties as well as Surgical Practicum I. Topics include standards of conduct, special populations, safety standards, biomedical medicine, asepsis and sterile technique, anesthesia, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: Introduction to Surgical Technology Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 42 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 CouRSE DESCRiPTioNS ST203 Surgical Procedures II 60 hours, 4 credits This course will expand on the duties and responsibilities as the role of scrub or STSR and circulator in the field of surgical technology. Areas explored and applied in this course include wound healing, surgical case management, instrumentation, diagnostic procedures, and an introduction to general surgery and the scrub role. This course is a preparatory class for Surgical Practicum II. Prerequisite: Surgical Procedures I ST207 Surgical Procedures III 60 hours, 4 credits This course will expand on the duties and responsibilities in the role of scrub in the field of surgical technology. Students will continue and apply knowledge gained in Surgical Procedures I and II as well as explore specialty surgery areas. This course is a preparatory class for Surgical Practicum I and II. Prerequisite: Surgical Procedures II ST215 Surgical Tech Practicum I 250 hours, 8 credits This course is designed to provide the student with a clinical experience that includes a solid introduction to the operating room, and to scrub and circulating routines. This course functions to expand and apply knowledge gained in the Surgical Procedures courses. One of the assumptions of this curriculum is that the student who has passed the Clinical Readiness portion of the program will be ready to apply knowledge by scrubbing and circulating in a supervised setting beginning Week 1 of this course. Prerequisite: Surgical Procedures III ST220 Surgical Tech Practicum II 250 hours, 8 credits This course is designed to provide the student with a clinical experience that includes a solid introduction to the operating room, and to scrub and circulating routines. This course functions to expand and apply knowledge gained in the Surgical Procedures courses and the Surgical Tech Practicum I clinical experience. One of the assumptions of this curriculum is that the student who has passed Surgical Practicum I will continue to apply knowledge by scrubbing and circulating in a supervised setting beginning Week 1 of this course. Prerequisite: Surgical Tech Practicum I W108 Introduction to Website Design 40 hours, 3 credits Intended for beginning- to intermediate-level web authors, this course provides an overview of the World Wide Web and an introduction to HTML, JavaScript, and webpage design principles. The course also introduces students to web-authoring tools that facilitate and enhance page creation. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems W110 JavaScript 40 hours, 3 credits In this course students learn how to effectively create webpages using the JavaScript programming language. Students will gain exposure to programming, debugging, and testing webpages created with this language. This course builds upon HTML principles. Prerequisite: Introduction to HTML W112 Database Design and SQL 40 hours, 3 credits This course covers relational databases and their efficient design. The course will include the definition of tables and indexes, logical and physical design, the E-R model, and transaction management. The use of Structured Query Language (SQL) will be emphasized. Prerequisite: none W114 Fundamentals of Programming 40 hours, 3 credits This course is an introduction to computer concepts, logic, and programming. It includes designing, coding, debugging, testing, and documenting programs using a high-level programming language. The course provides the beginning programmer with a guide to developing structured program logic. Prerequisite: none W116 Introduction to Web Design Software 40 hours, 3 credits This course will introduce beginners to the tools and knowledge needed in creating interesting, usable, and well designed websites. Prerequisite: none W118 Introduction to HTML 40 hours, 3 credits This course will introduce students to the basics of HTML. Students will learn the latest in HTML, conforming to XML and XHTML coding standards. The course is a step-by-step approach for learning how to create, format, and enhance a webpage using HTML. Prerequisite: none W122 Introduction to Visual Basic 2005 40 hours, 3 credits The students who take this course will learn to create basic applications using Visual Basic .NET. It covers language basics and program structure. Topics include graphical interface design and development, control properties, event-driven procedures, variables, scope, expressions, operators, functions, decisionmaking structures, looping structures, and database access files. Prerequisite: none W208 Advanced Website Design 40 hours, 3 credits Students learn how to use web publishing tools used most often by professional designers. Topics include advanced techniques for the design, layout, and authoring of webpages. Prerequisite: Introduction to Website Design W210 Java I 40 hours, 3 credits The focus is on the development of clientserver applications and advanced GUI. Topics include Java features (such as enums, autoboxing, and generic types), multithreading, collections, files, advanced multimedia and GUIs, internationalization, and web programming (including database use, networking, security, servlets, JavaServer Pages, JavaBeans, and Remote Method Invocation). Prerequisite: JavaScript W215 PERL/CGI 40 hours, 3 credits This course will cover the PERL scripting language, the development of PERL code for web applications, and client/server socket programming using PERL. Prerequisite: Java I W216 PHP/MYSQL 40 hours, 3 credits This course covers the use of PHP scripting language and the MYSQL database to create dynamic webpages. Topics include PHP scripting fundamentals; creating, accessing, and manipulating data with the MYSQL database within a PHP program; creating HTML forms; and writing secure PHP programs. Prerequisite: Java I W222 Visual Basic 2005 Advanced 40 hours, 3 credits The students who take this course will learn to create applications using Visual Basic .NET. This course incorporates the basic concepts of programming, problem solving, and programming logic, as well as the design techniques of an object-oriented language. Topics in the course include graphic interface design and development, control properties, DBMS, SQL, and ASP.NET. Prerequisite: Introduction to Visual Basic 2005 W290 Web Programming Capstone* 20 hours, 2 credits This course summarizes key learning throughout the student’s program. Students apply what they have learned by solving a real-world programming problem. This problem-solving exercise encompasses timelines, deadlines, team-building, and communication issues. Prerequisites: Java I and PERL/CGI. This course is intended to be completed in the student’s last quarter. Courses designated with an asterisk (*) are generally offered only as online classes. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 43 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Rasmussen College Admissions Nondiscrimination Policy Rasmussen College is committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education. Rasmussen College admits students without regard to their race, color, sex, age, national or ethnic origin, religion, sexual orientation, ancestry, disability, veteran status, marital status, parental status, or any other protected status to all the rights, privileges, programs, and other activities generally accorded or made available to students at Rasmussen College. Rasmussen College does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national or ethnic origin, religion, sexual orientation, ancestry, disability, veteran status, marital status, parental status, or any other protected status, in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other Rasmussen College administered programs and activities. Otherwise qualified persons are not subject to discrimination on the basis of disability. Student Definition The word “student” means the student himself or herself if he/she is the party to the contract, or his/her parents or guardian or another person, if the parent, guardian, or other person is party to the contract on behalf of the student. Class Content The College reserves the right at any time to make changes to improve the quality or content of the programs of study offered. The College reserves the right to cancel any classes or programs where enrollment is under 12 students. Class Standing Rasmussen College determines class standing by the number of credit hours a student has completed. The College assigns class standings according to the following criteria: Freshman 0-36 credits completed Sophomore 37-72 credits completed Junior 73-129 credits completed Senior 130 or more credits completed College Acceptance or Rejection of Application for Admission The College will notify each applicant in writing of acceptance or rejection based on fulfillment of the following requirements: • Completed application form • Application fee • An attestation of high school graduation or equivalency. If the attestation is found to be untrue, the student will be subject to immediate dismissal from the College, all credits will be invalidated and any financial aid will have to be repaid. • Completed Placement Examinations (taken at Rasmussen College). • For selected programs, applicants must also pass a background check. See additional information below. In the event of rejection, any monies paid will be refunded in full. The date of acceptance by the College shall be presumed to be the date of delivery of the notice of acceptance; and if delivered by mail, the postmarked date of the letter of acceptance. Background Checks For some programs, Rasmussen College requires applicants to pass a background check before admission. The background check is designed to alert students to issues that may impair their ability to complete practicum activities or obtain employment upon graduation. The programs that require a background check for admission are the following: • Health Information Technician AAS • Massage Therapy AAS / Diploma • Medical Assisting AAS • Medical Laboratory Technician AAS • Pharmacy Technician AAS • Surgical Technologist AAS • Early Childhood Education AAS/Certificate • Criminal Justice AAS • Human Services AAS • Law Enforcement AAS • Law Enforcement Academic and Skills Certificates • Paralegal AAS / Certificate • Practical Nursing AAS In addition to this general background check, applicants to the Law Enforcement programs or the Professional Peace Officer Education track of the Criminal Justice AAS must also submit to a Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension background check. Applicants to the Human Services, Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Pharmacy Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must also submit to a Minnesota Department of Human Services background check, in addition to the general background check. A student enrolling in any of the designated programs must complete a Background Release Form, as well as a Background Check Attestation. Campuses will be notified directly of applicants whose background check results are clear.If the background check reveals a potential problem, Rasmussen College will review the applicant’s background to determine whether the applicant is eligible to start the program. The College will send either a possible issue letter, or a pre-adverse action letter to all applicants whose background check reveals a potential problem. A possible issue letter informs applicants that a potential problem revealed in their background check may prevent the student from completing practicum activities and/or finding employment after graduation. Applicants who receive a possible issue letter may acknowledge the issue and make an informed decision to continue with the program, or they may choose to change programs. A pre-adverse action letter informs the student that the College either will not allow the applicant to enroll in a certain program, or will remove a student from a certain program, based on the background check. The student may contact the background check firm to dispute the information contained in the background check. The College must be informed within seven days of sending the pre-adverse action letter that the student is disputing the information. If this does not occur, the College will send the student an adverse action letter indicating the action to be taken. The Director of Admissions will contact the applicant to explain the options available. If the applicant wishes to appeal the decision, a written appeal should be submitted to the Director of Admissions. The College will review the appeal and issue a final decision. Applying to the Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and School of Nursing Programs Applicants must achieve an acceptable score on the STEP entrance/placement exam above that requiring a remedial course as detailed in the current Rasmussen College catalog. Applicants must be able to qualify for Math coursework and English Composition even if plans are to transfer credits from a previously attended program. Applicants with lower than admissible scores may choose to repeat the application process once an English Composition or Math course has been successfully completed. Entrance Assessment The STEP (Student Testing for Educational Placement) exam is used for entrance assessment. Based on the outcomes in the areas of English and math students are placed in the following courses: Subject Score Course Placement Writing 0-16 items correct B097, Foundations of English I Writing 17-24 items correct B098, Foundations of English II Writing 25-35 items correct G124, English Composition Math 0-16 items correct B099, Foundations of Math Math 17-35 items correct Lower-division Math coursework Assessment Rasmussen College has developed an institutional culture wherein assessment is at the heart of the College’s daily functions. The Rasmussen College Comprehensive Assessment Plan (CAP) is the primary measurement for the Institution’s mission. The CAP is organized around the Mission Statement and the six Purposes that support the mission. For each purpose, supporting objectives have been developed, and assessment tools are used to collect data and assess each objective. In this way, the College systematically assesses the purposes and, ultimately, the mission of the institution. In the spirit of this learning-focused approach to assessment, academic assessment at Rasmussen College follows a pattern of incoming, ongoing, and outcome assessment. Applicants should understand that admission to the program is based on several factors with entrance test scores being the most significant. Therefore it must not be assumed or implied that successful completion of an English Composition and/or Math course will guarantee admission into the program. Former or current students who have taken the STEP and scored above that requiring a remedial course are not required to repeat the STEP test. Once it has been determined that an applicant has scored sufficiently on the STEP, the Evolve A2 exam will then be scheduled. The Evolve A2 is a computerized exam designed to determine the ability of the applicant to be successful in the program. The applicant must pay a $65 non-refundable testing fee at time of scheduling. This fee includes the exam and study guide which is to be issued by the Program Manager/ Director or may be mailed to the address of the applicant by the Health Science Admissions Coordinator. The A2 will be proctored twice monthly following the predetermined testing dates. The computerized A2 test usually takes approximately three to four hours to complete and will be offered at the local campus. Applicants must score 80% or higher in the areas of Math, Vocabulary, Reading, and Grammar. The Biology, Chemistry, and Anatomy and Physiology portions of the exam will be used for placement purposes. Applicants must also score 80% or higher on the exam as a whole. Actual test scores will only be furnished to students upon written request and must be accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. All requests must be made to the RCI Health Science Admissions Coordinator at the Orlando office. Applicants should allow 3 to 5 weeks for mailed results. Applicants who achieve the required score in the required categories will be contacted by their Admissions Coordinator or Representative to complete the following: • Application • Application fee (if deemed necessary) • Health Physical (must be completed annually) • BLS-CPR with defibrillator training (must remain current throughout enrollment) • Provide official high school and college transcrits • Hepatitis B vaccination The College has an academic assessment plan which is essential for evaluating and improving the quality of learning and instruction. The academic assessment plan evaluates incoming student skills through a placement test to ensure that all students have basic literacy and numeracy skills, in an ongoing fashion in individual courses, and at the end of programs through the Graduate Achievement Portfolio (GAP) and program outcomes assessment. Submission of a Graduate Achievement Portfolio, in which students demonstrate their communication, critical thinking, and information literacy skills, is a graduation requirement which students fulfill in E242 Career Development or in an appropriate capstone course for their program. • TB test or chest x-ray (must be completed annually) • Background screening/fingerprinting • Any additional program-specific requirements as specified at the time of enrollment If candidates wish to repeat the Evolve A2 to increase their score, they may do so by submitting a $25 retest fee. Only two attempts will be granted during a six-month period. Applicants who do not achieve a score of at least 80% in the required areas, or on the Evolve A2 as a whole, will not be able to repeat the entrance process for 6 months after the date of the second exam. After this period applicants must repeat the entire entrance process before acceptance can be granted. Former program students who have not been enrolled for more than 12 months must successfully repeat the Evolve A2 to be deemed eligible for reenrollment into their previous program of study. Current students wishing to transfer into another course of study requiring admissions standards will be required to take or retake the Evolve A2. Applicants who fail to achieve a score of 80% in the specified areas of the Evolve A2, or on the exam as a whole, may appeal this requirement. In order to appeal, applicants must submit a written request to the evaluating committee. Once the applicant file is complete, the Admissions Coordinator/Representative will schedule a face-to-face interview between the applicant and Program Coordinator/Director. After the expiration of the application process, completed files will be reviewed by the acceptance committee consisting of the Program Coordinator/Director, the Dean, and one other member of the management team. A letter of acceptance will be sent via Registered Mail to the number of applicants needed to fill the approved cohort. Two additional applicants may be chosen as alternates in the event an applicant is deemed ineligible or decides not to begin class. These two alternates should complete all the necessary steps for admissions. Alternates will be guaranteed the opportunity for enrollment into the next cohort provided they remain eligible for admission. Applicants must also attend programmatic orientation as well as general orientation or risk being dismissed as an applicant. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 44 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Individual Progress Students may enroll in one or more courses at a time, or in succeeding quarters, without enrolling in a program of study. To be considered for admission, individual progress students must complete the application form and attestation of high school graduation. The STEP test is not required for IP students. Individual progress coursework is assessed at the full cost per credit for each course. Individual progress students remain enrolled at Rasmussen College as long as they continue to select coursework and meet all additional requirements. Upon successful completion of their courses, individual progress students will receive a letter grade and be awarded credits. To enroll in a program at Rasmussen College, students must complete all remaining programmatic application requirements (including the STEP test). Eligible individual progress courses will be applied to their degree program, and count as credits attempted and earned for purposes of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). Immunization Requirements Minnesota law (M.S. 135A.14) requires proof that all students born after 1956 are vaccinated against diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps, and rubella, allowing for certain specified exemptions. Non-exempt students must submit the required vaccination information within 45 days after their first enrollment, or they cannot remain enrolled. Please see the campus for a list of possible exceptions. In addition to other entrance requirements, Allied Health and Nursing programs may require specific immunizations upon enrollment. Please see your campus for details. Developmental Education The goal of developmental education is to provide students with a solid foundation of basic skills and knowledge as they move on to college level classes. Placement into foundation courses reflects the commitment Rasmussen College has to ensuring the success of all students and to providing educational opportunities to those who enroll. All new students who enroll in a degree, diploma, or certificate program are required to take the STEP reading, writing, and math placement tests. Returning students who did not take the STEP or COMPASS test but who have successfully completed the courses at Rasmussen College for which Foundations courses are prerequisites, or their equivalents, do not need to take the STEP test. Returning students who have not successfully completed the Foundations courses, their equivalents, or the courses for which Foundations courses are prerequisites must take the STEP test. Coursework in math or English that is numbered below 100 is considered to be developmental. STEP scores are used to appropriately place students in English and math courses according to skill level. See Entrance Assessment Table for placement scores. These credits are not counted toward graduation, and each must be passed with a grade of ‘SX’ in order to proceed to the next course in the sequence. Students who transfer from other colleges, and whose test scores fall within the range of remediation, will be required to complete the foundation courses. Students who test at remediation level, and who wish to transfer courses that have foundations courses as prerequisites, must first complete the foundations courses. Students enrolled in foundation courses are eligible for financial aid. Foundation courses must be taken in conjunction with courses contained in an eligible program. B097 Foundations of English I is not offered online. Students who place at the level of Foundations of English I after taking the placement examination are not eligible to enroll in fully online programs until the successful completion of B097. Accommodations Policy Rasmussen College recognizes its obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and commits to the success of its students and faculty by prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a disability and requiring reasonable accommodations to the qualified disabled students and faculty members in all programs, activities and employment. Students with disabilities do not have to self-disclose or register with the Campus Accommodations Officer, although the College encourages them to do so. Students seeking academic accommodations or adjustments must contact the Campus Accommodations Officer to request such services. Students who are unsure who to contact should check with their Academic Dean. STEP Retest Policy The STEP entrance exam may not be retaken for initial placement purposes after the start of the course. On occasion, however, a retest may be allowed prior to the start of a quarter. Such retests are only granted if extenuating circumstances exist that lead the enrolling student to feel that the STEP test results do not accurately reflect his or her true abilities. Only one such retest may be allowed, at the discretion of the Academic Dean. Foundation Courses Timeframe To help ensure student success, and that Rasmussen College is using the STEP placement test to its fullest potential, students who need foundation courses must complete all of those courses in their first three quarters. These students must, at a minimum, complete a foundation course in their first quarter of enrollment, except for students starting during a mid-term start who may complete the course within their first two quarters. If for some reason students fail to do this, they cannot continue their education at Rasmussen College. Equipment Rasmussen College strives to maintain its role as an educational leader by incorporating current technology. Rasmussen College provides technology and computer access, and internet access at each campus. Students will also have access to printers, additional software packages, electronic databases and a helpdesk lab as needed. Educational Records Definition A student’s education records are defined as files, materials, or documents that contain information directly related to the student and are maintained by the Institution. Access to a student’s education records is afforded to school officials who have a legitimate educational interest in the records, such as for purposes of recording grades, attendance, advising, and determining financial aid eligibility. Grading System Percentage Scale A 100 TO 93% A92 TO 90% B+ 89 TO 87% B 86 TO 83% B82 TO 80% C+ 79 TO 77% C 76 TO 73% C72 TO 70% D+ 69 TO 67% D 66 TO 63% D62 TO 60% F Below 60% Point Scale Alphabetical Grading System Grade Grade Points Description A 4.00 Excellent A3.75 B+ 3.50 B 3.00 Very Good B2.75 C+ 2.50 C 2.00 Average C1.75 D+ 1.50 D 1.00 Below Average D0.75 F/FA 0.00 Failure CW NA Course Waiver I/IN NA See “Incomplete Policy” S/SA NA Satisfactory SX NA Satisfactory Foundations TO NA Test-Out TR NA Transfer In Credit U/UN NA Unsatisfactory or failure to meet speed requirement UX NA Unsatisfactory Foundations W/WD NA Withdrawal WX NA Withdraw Passing ZF NA Failure to complete non-credit course requirement ZP NA Successful completion of non-credit course Lab-Intensive Allied Health Programs Grade Scale The following grade scale applies to all ES, MA, ML, MT, PB, PT, and ST coursework. Letter Grade Percentage Range A 100 to 93 % A92 to 90% B+ 89 to 87% B 86 to 83% B82 to 80% C+ 79 to 77% C 76 to 73% F Below 73% Nursing Programs Grade Scale The following grade scale applies to all PN coursework. Letter Grade Percentage Range A 100 to 94 % B 93 to 85% C 84 to 78% F Below 78% All grades are to be credits successfully completed with the exception of the ‘W/WD’ and ‘U/UN’ which is counted as an attempted course for the purpose of maximum time frame and percentage of course completion and may have an effect on achieving satisfactory progress. See “Standards of Satisfactory Progress for Institutional and Financial Aid Guidelines.” Foundations Course Grading 1. All Foundations courses are satisfactory/ unsatisfactory (SX/UX) courses. In each of these courses, the final exam comprises 40% of the final grade. The remaining 60% of the final grade is determined by other coursework. 2. Students automatically pass B097 Foundations of English I if they achieve a score of 17 or more (out of 35 items) on the final exam/end of quarter post-test in this class. Students in B097 Foundations of English I who earn a score of 25 or more (out of 35) on the post-test have achieved the necessary basic literacy skills and will not be required to take B098 Foundations of English II. 3. Students automatically pass B098 Foundations of English II if they achieve a score of 25 or more (out of 35 items) on the final exam/end of quarter post-test in this class. 4. Students automatically pass B099 Foundations of Math if they achieve a score of 17 or more (out of 35 items) on the final exam/end of quarter post-test in this class. 5. Students that do not achieve the scores listed above on their final exams may still pass these courses. In such cases, the final exam counts as 40% of their overall grade, with their weekly work comprising the remaining 60%. The following grading scale is then used to determine if students have passed the courses: Foundations Course Grading Scale Foundations of English I SX 60% or more UX Below 60% Foundations of English II SX 70% or more UX Below 70% Foundations of Math SX 60% or more UX Below 70% Repeating Failed Courses Failed courses may be retaken, but only at regular tuition rates. Students repeating a course may count the credits for that course in a financial aid award calculation only if the original grade earned is an “F/FA.” If a student elects to repeat a course for which a grade above “F/FA” was earned, the credits are not included in the financial aid award calculation, thereby making the student responsible for payment out-of-pocket at regular tuition rates. The credits for all repeated courses will be included in credits attempted for the purposes of determining the satisfactory progress evaluation checkpoint, along with the credits from the first time the course was taken. The grade earned from a repeated course will replace the grade in the student’s cumulative GPA from the first time the student took the course. The student’s GPA should be recalculated to reflect the new letter grade. Students who fail a required course twice may be able to switch to another program that does not include the course as a required part of the program curriculum. Students who fail a course twice, and who cannot switch to another program, will be terminated from the College. Those students cannot return to the College until they successfully complete an equivalent to the course elsewhere and transfer it back in to Rasmussen College, in accordance with meeting the transfer of credit requirements. In the case of credit transfer, the “TR” replaces the “F/FA” for purposes of GPA calculation. However, all of the course credits, both failed and transferred, count in the student’s Cumulative Completion Rate (CCR). Late Assignment Submission Policy Students may submit assigned work after the stated deadline. A 10% grade penalty is assessed for work up to twenty-four hours late; an additional 10% is assessed for each additional day the work is late. In some cases (such as late discussion postings) students may be asked to complete an alternate assignment for equivalent point value, minus any applicable penalty. Instructors may decide in the case of legitimately extenuating circumstances to waive the late penalty; if not, though, the penalty must be enforced as described. In some cases in the residential classroom, certain activities, such as labs and exams, must be completed at the designated time and therefore cannot be made up. The instructor should apprise students beforehand of any such activities. In no circumstances may students submit work after the last day of the academic term unless an incomplete grade has been requested and granted beforehand. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 45 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Incomplete Grade Policy An ‘I/In’ indicates an incomplete grade, and is a temporary grade for a course which a student is unable to complete due to extenuating circumstances. An incomplete may be granted to a student at the end of a quarter at the discretion of the instructor under the following conditions: 1. An incomplete form is completed which identifies: a. the work to be completed, b. qualifications for acceptable work, c. the deadline for completing the work (within two weeks of the last day of class), d. the grade to be entered should the student not complete the work by the deadline (the calculated grade). e. Instructors will have one week for grading, recalculation of grades and processing of all documents required. 2. An incomplete form is not valid without written confirmation from both the instructor and the student prior to the date that final grades are due. If either the student or the instructor does not provide written confirmation, the calculated grade is to be entered as a final grade. Incomplete forms will be maintained by the respective campus for approval and resolution. Students must request an incomplete prior to the last day of the end of the term. 3. The Academic Dean must be informed of all incompletes granted, and must sign the form as well. Incompletes will be granted rarely and instructors will take the following into consideration when granting an incomplete: 1. The work to be completed must be regularly assigned work, identified in the course syllabus. 2. The student can reasonably be expected to complete the work by the deadline. 3. The student’s grade will be substantially improved. 4. The student has demonstrated a commitment to completing work in a timely fashion. 5. Granting the incomplete is truly in the best interest of the student. 6. By completing the work, one of the following will apply: a. The student will learn substantive information by completing the work. b. The student will learn higher level thinking skills or gain substantially greater command of the subject matter. 7. Allowing the student extra time compensates for events or conditions not within the student’s control (i.e., illness, emergencies, etc.) as opposed to compensating for poor planning, poor attendance, or failure to take assignments seriously. 8. Incompletes may not be granted only for the sake of improved cumulative grade point average, nor will they be granted to allow students to make up “extra credit” work. 9. Credits for all incomplete courses will be counted as credits attempted but not earned in the quarter of enrollment. Incomplete grades must be completed within two weeks of the last day of class. An incomplete grade not completed by the deadline will be changed to an ‘FA’ (or the calculated alternate grade designated by the instructor on the incomplete form) and will be included in the cumulative grade point average. The final grade awarded for the course is included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. 10. All incompletes, unless approved by the Dean, will be finalized by the 3rd week of the subsequent term. Incomplete Policy for Practicums In order to successfully complete a practicum experience, students must complete the required number of practicum hours for the course. Students who do not complete all required practicum hours during the quarter in which the course is scheduled will receive a grade of Incomplete in the practicum course. If the student does not complete the remainder of the required practicum hours during the subsequent quarter, the student will receive a grade of F. Students will graduate at the end of the quarter in which they successfully complete all required practicum hours and other program requirements. Policy for Change of Grade On occasion it is appropriate to change a final grade submitted by an instructor at the end of a quarter. Except for situations outlined below, only the instructor who issued the original grade may authorize its change. Instructors may change grades at their discretion, with the following guidelines: Circumstances that may warrant a change of grade include: • Emergency situations that prevent a student from submitting a petition to receive an incomplete grade. Examples of such emergencies are hospitalization, car accident, death of a close family member, or mandatory military service. • Miscalculation of the final grade by the instructor. • Situations involving miscommunications, misplaced assignments, or technical difficulties beyond the control of the student. • Accommodation for special circumstances such as short-term disability or family leave. Grade changes must be consistent with course policies as outlined on the syllabus. In particular, stated policies regarding the acceptance of late work and how points are apportioned must be followed. Students must contact their instructors within two weeks of the start of a subsequent term regarding grade changes. Instructors will have one week from the time they are contacted by students to consider any requests for grade changes. No grade changes may be made after the end of the third week of the subsequent quarter. Grade disputes which cannot be resolved between instructors and students should be directed to the appropriate Dean. Circumstances where a grade change may be authorized by someone other than the original instructor include: • Administrative errors regarding grades will be corrected by administrative staff as soon as they are identified. • If the original instructor is no longer available to submit a grade change (for example, an adjunct instructor no longer employed at the College), the Academic Dean may determine if a grade change is appropriate. • The Dean may authorize grade changes in order to settle academic grievances. Independent Study Policy Independent study applies when a student contracts to meet regularly with a qualified instructor to fulfill the assignments, tests, projects, and other tasks necessary to achieve the performance objectives of a given course. Independent study requires a student to be motivated and organized. Because an independent study does not provide the student with the classroom interaction normally expected in higher education, it is to be offered only when there is no alternative and as infrequently as possible. Students may take, and the College may offer, a course through independent study under the following conditions: 1. The course is not currently offered on-site or online. 2. Completion of the course is necessary for on-time graduation. 3. The need for the course in the quarter in question does not arise from the student’s decision to withdraw from the course in an earlier quarter, the student’s failure to satisfactorily complete the course in an earlier quarter, or the student’s decision to change programs. 4. The student will complete work of a similar quantity and quality as required in a regularly scheduled class and will meet the standard performance objectives for the class. 5. The Academic Dean approves the plan for completing the course work. 6. The student and instructor meet once a week for a minimum of one hour with sufficient learning activities planned to fulfill the clock hour requirements of the course. 7. At least twice and at regular intervals during the quarter, the Dean will evaluate the student’s progress by reviewing work completed. Independent studies must meet the following guidelines: Prior to the beginning of the independent study, the student and instructor must meet to define the following: a. When and where they will meet each week. b. Weekly objectives for work to be completed based upon the same weekly objectives defined by the syllabus for an on-site class. c. Progress checks to be reviewed by the Dean. d. Standards of academic quality for the work to be completed. e. Deadline for all work to be completed at the end of the quarter. Credit by Examination Enrolled students may request credit by examination for 100-level and 200-level courses in which they have been scheduled if an exam has been developed. Credit by examination is not offered for 300-level or 400-level courses, or for Success Strategies, Career Development, practicums, or capstones or designated capstones. In order to request credit by examination for N, NM, and W courses, students must provide documentation of at least one year of relevant work experience. For D, N, NM, and W courses, and for some B and PL courses, industry certification may be considered for credit in lieu of the examination. Program-specific Massage Therapy, Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing courses, and 200-level Pharmacy Technician courses are not available for credit by examination. In addition, the Healthcare Information Technologies and Pharmacy Software/ Automation/Insurance Billing courses are not available for credit by examination. Students must request credit by examination from the Academic Dean, Director of Campus Operations, or Associate Campus Director prior to the start of the quarter. An examination score of 83% or higher is required to receive credit by examination. The examination grade will be reflect as “TO” (test-out) on the transcript, and will not count in the student’s grade-point average. These credits will not count as credits for financial-aid purposes. A credit by examination may be taken only once for each course. If a student has already attempted the course, as indicated by a posted W/WD or F/FA grade, no test-out attempt will be allowed. Students must complete 33% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 67% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Students in the Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete 50% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 50% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Course Waivers Students who have earned at least 24 semester or 36 quarter credits at an accredited institution of higher education, regardless of program of study, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, may request a waiver from Success Strategies if they wish. Students with a two-year degree or higher from an accredited institution of higher education, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, may also request a course waiver from Success Strategies. The Academic Dean will review the student academic transcript, and if the criteria are met, will waive the Success Strategies course requirement, and the grade will be posted in The Rasmussen College student record as a “CW.” Students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in their program major courses may request a waiver for any scheduled M or PT practicum coursework if they wish. Students must complete and submit the required paperwork to their Program Coordinator/Director prior to the start of the quarter of the practicum for it to be waived. Students must have a variety of experiences in the necessary medical fields rather than from just one area, and documentation will be required from the student’s employer. The Program Coordinator/Director will inform the Academic Dean of the result of the evaluation, and if the waiver is granted the grade posted in the Rasmussen College student record will be a “CW.” In some instances, the content of upper-level courses at Rasmussen College corresponds to lower-level courses in previous versions of the College’s two-year degree programs. (Although these courses were included in previous twoyear degree programs, their content was more suited to the upper-level core of a four-year degree program.) Depending on the total credits needed to complete a program, the following may be applied: 1. If a bachelor’s degree program student has taken a previous lower-level Rasmussen College course that corresponds to an upperlevel course, and the student has completed an excess of other lower-level credits, the lower-level course will be taken in internal transfer and a grade entry of “CW” will be posted in the student record for the upperlevel course. Students must still complete the required number of total credits to graduate from the bachelor’s degree program. 2. In some cases, to complete the required number of total credits for the bachelor’s degree program the student must complete an appropriate, additional upper-level course in substitution that has been approved by the Academic Dean. The earned grade for the course taken as a replacement will then be added to the student record and the grade and credits will be counted as part of SAP calculations. The course for which a substitution has been made will not be considered for SAP calculations. Students must complete 33% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 67% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Students in the Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete 50% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 50% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Course Withdrawals The credits for all courses in which the last date of attendance was after the drop deadline will be counted in the cumulative credits attempted. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 46 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Transfer Credit Policy 1. Students who wish to transfer credits to Rasmussen College must first apply for admission to the College. 2. Students must request that official transcripts containing coursework to be reviewed for transfer of credit be sent directly to Rasmussen College. 3. As part of the acceptance process, official transcripts will be evaluated for transfer of credit. Students will receive notification regarding courses which transferred and the Rasmussen College courses they will replace. This information is also noted on the Rasmussen College transcript. 4. Rasmussen College reserves the right to accept or deny transfer of credit based on the guidelines defined below. 5. E242 Career Development is a course designed to facilitate lifelong careerplacement services and the collection of the Graduate Achievement Portfolio. Therefore, although transfer credits may be considered for the E242 Career Development course, it is not available for credit by examination. Further, if previous college credits are accepted in transfer for this course, students will be required to communicate with College placement representatives to review their employment status and to submit their Graduate Achievement Portfolio (which is a requirement for graduation). E150 Success Strategies is not available for credit by examination because its completion is deemed vital to student success. However, E150 will be considered for transfer if a similar course with appropriate credits has been completed with a grade of C or higher at an accredited institution of higher education. 6. Rasmussen College awards quarter credits. In considering transfer courses, a semester credit is equivalent to 1.33 quarter credits. 7. Students must complete 33% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 67% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Students in the Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete 50% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 50% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. 8. All credit transfer is evaluated with the following guidelines: a. Transfer credits from accredited colleges, other than Rasmussen College, will be evaluated on course content. Most courses that are comparable in content from other colleges will be accepted. Students must have received a C or higher to transfer a course to a Rasmussen College program. b. Courses which have been transferred will be listed on the student’s transcript with a TR designation. However, grade points from institutions other than Rasmussen College will not be computed in the Rasmussen College grade-point average. c. Courses from accredited degree-granting colleges which are intended to transfer as general-education requirements will be considered in the General Education categories listed in the Rasmussen College catalog. d. Transfer credits from within the Rasmussen College system will be transferred directly from one Rasmussen College campus to another. Grade-point averages and grades from courses taken at any of the Rasmussen College campuses will be computed in the student’s final grade-point average. e. When courses are not accepted for transfer, a student may file an appeal through the following process: i. The student completes an appeal form. Supplemental information such as a syllabus, course description, or text may be required. ii. The information will be reviewed by the Academic Dean, Campus Director, or Director of Campus Operations/ Associate Campus Director, along with appropriate faculty. iii. The student will receive written notice of the decision. f. Students who enter Rasmussen College are required to take the STEP placement exam. If a student tests at a level of remediation in English or Math, the College will not accept transfer of courses with prerequisites that require completion of the Foundations courses or passing the STEP exam. Once the student successfully completes the necessary Foundations courses and passes the placement exams, the College may reconsider transfer of credit for those courses. g. For courses that are not part of a conferred degree to be considered for transfer, credits for major/core courses completed at other institutions must have been earned within the previous ten years of the transfer request date. Credits in information technology or computer science/computer applications completed at other institutions must have been earned within the previous five years of the transfer request date. Credits in nursing completed at other institutions or at Rasmussen College must have been earned within the previous one year of the transfer request date. General education credits may be considered for transfer regardless of completion date. General education courses that are included as part of a program major/core are to be considered as general education credits for purposes of transfer. College Equivalency Credits The College recognizes the following collegeequivalency credits: • Advanced Placement (AP) examinations and courses based upon the College Board’s AP Central for Educators 5-point grade/ value scale. • College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations administered by the College Board. Credits earned through the above methods are eligible for acceptance in general-education categories only. Students with AP credits in general-education subjects may receive credit if the examination or course score is a 3 or higher. Students who have completed CLEP examinations corresponding to the College’s general-education categories may receive credit if the examination score is 50 or higher. Other types of college-equivalency courses and/or examinations may be evaluated for eligibility by the Academic Dean. Credits earned through college-equivalency programs will be posted on student transcripts as test-out credits (TO) and may not be assigned letter grades or applied to cumulative grade-point-average credits. Students must complete 33% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 67% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Students in the Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete 50% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 50% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Prerequisites In order to take a course listing a prerequisite, the student must have received a passing grade in the prerequisite. General Education Philosophy The purpose of general education is to promote breadth of knowledge and intellectual inquiry as a central part of all programs, each of which is intended to enable graduates to enjoy productive and satisfying careers. Through general education students are challenged to sharpen oral and written communication skills, to understand the breadth of disciplines that support their selected field of study, and to function responsibly and constructively in a rapidly changing world. All programs at Rasmussen College are designed to prepare students for the challenges of career and community life. Regardless of length, each program will integrate general education concepts and skills to prepare students to: 1. Effectively communicate, orally and in writing, in the workplace, in the community, and interpersonally. 2. Analyze, evaluate, and solve problems that arise in employment and in life. 3. Locate, evaluate, and effectively use information from a variety of sources, print and electronic, meeting common standards for intellectual and academic integrity. In addition to these cross-curricular general education concepts and skills, the general education coursework that is part of degree and diploma programs is organized into categories, each of which emphasizes a set of general knowledge and content areas. In the areas of English Composition and Communication, students will demonstrate understanding of basic rhetorical strategies including audience, purpose, thesis statements, effective organization, and/or the use of adequate and relevant evidence. In the area of Humanities, students will demonstrate understanding of different forms of art; the difference between creative and critical thinking; the elements associated with various art forms; and/or the function of creative production and expression in society. In the area of Math and Natural Sciences, students will demonstrate understanding of the notation and terminology used in mathematics; the effect that such calculations accomplish; the difference between the valid and invalid use of data and statistics; the fundamental scientific processes, theories, facts, concepts, and principles; the difference between facts and opinions; and/or the steps of the scientific method. In the area of Social Sciences, students will demonstrate understanding of the major concepts, issues, ideas and models in social science; methods of scientific inquiry as they affect social science; methods of qualitative and quantitative research; and/or how social, cultural, and political factors influence social and historical change. General Education Requirements for Rasmussen College Credentials AAS degree candidates must successfully fulfill the general education requirements detailed in their chosen degree program. Students are expected to complete thirty-two (32) credits of general education coursework, distributed across the following five categories: English Composition, Communication, Humanities, Math/Natural Science, and Social Science. BS degree candidates must successfully complete thirty-two (32) credits of general education coursework at the lower-division level; in addition, they must also successfully complete sixteen (16) additional upper-division general education credits distributed across the following categories: Communication, Humanities, Math/Natural Science, and Social Science. Diploma candidates must successfully complete twelve (12) credits of general education coursework, including English Composition, College Algebra, and an additional course as designated by program. Certificate programs typically do not include general education course requirements because they are designed to meet specific career goals. Courses that are primarily developmental or remedial in nature and content may not be included in the general education total. Allied Health Externships, Practicums, and Clinicals Externships, clinicals, and practicums for Allied Health programs are to be conducted in Rasmussen-approved locations. Each practicum site will be established utilizing an agreement to determine the responsibilities of the practicum partner, Rasmussen College, and the participating student. Students may need to travel out of the immediate area to complete practicum activities. The cost of any such travel is the responsibility of the student. In order to successfully complete a practicum experience, students must complete the required number of practicum hours for the course. Students who do not complete all required practicum hours during the quarter in which the course is scheduled will fail the practicum course. All student activities associated with the curriculum, especially while the student is completing his or her clinical rotations, will be educational in nature. The student will not receive any monetary remuneration during this educational experience, nor will he or she be substituted for hired staff personnel within the clinical institution. Often, students will be offered a position towards the end of their rotation. It must be understood by both parties that should compensation occur for time associated with the practicum requirement, the student may be dismissed from the program and forfeit any accumulated hours. Graduation Requirements Degrees, diplomas, and certificates are awarded solely on the merit and completion of requirements listed, and not on the basis of clock hours in attendance. Students must complete 33% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 67% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Students in the Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete 50% of their program requirements at Rasmussen College, and no more than 50% may be completed via transfer credits, course waivers, credit by examination, or other means. Clock hours listed in the synopsis of subjects are estimated hours of class work necessary to complete the subject. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 to receive a degree, diploma, or certificate with a passing grade in each area. Completion and submission of the Graduate Achievement Portfolio (GAP) is a graduation requirement for all programs regardless of length. Certificates or transcripts of credits may be given to those students taking individual subjects or individual progress courses of study. Transcripts Transcripts of credits will be given to students when all tuition obligations have been met. A fee of $5.00 is charged for each transcript. This fee is charged to all students requesting an academic transcript with exception to graduates and completers. The institution reserves the right to withhold official academic transcripts from students under certain circumstances such as having an outstanding financial obligation to the College. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 47 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Transfer to Other Colleges Graduates or students who are considering transfer from Rasmussen College to other institutions recognize that acceptance of transfer credits is at the discretion of the receiving institution. However, many academic credits earned at Rasmussen College are acceptable in transfer by various institutions. Please see the Dean with questions about transfer to other colleges. Attendance A basic requirement for employment in any business is regular, on-time attendance. Rasmussen College students are expected to be on time and in regular attendance for all of their classes. Business etiquette also requires a call be made if an absence is necessary. Rasmussen College students are expected to call the College and to indicate if they will be absent or tardy. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the instructor and to get the assignments and information missed. Rasmussen College uses a standard grading scale for its courses (although some programs may be required to follow additional standards), and attendance is not used as a method of evaluation for course grades. Faculty are required to keep accurate attendance records which are submitted to the Business Office. Rasmussen College makes attendance records available to supporting agencies and prospective employers. Students must maintain regular attendance and be in satisfactory academic standing to remain eligible for financial aid. If a student has not been in attendance within 21 days of their last date of attendance he or she may be withdrawn from the College. Upon withdrawal a student’s financial aid eligibility will be adjusted according to the Institution’s refund policy as described in the College catalog and will be assigned grades according to the Rasmussen College Drop Class Policy. Consortium Agreement Rasmussen College has signed consortium agreements among all Rasmussen College campuses. Course requirements for programs may be completed at any of the campus locations, as the schools have common ownership and common courses, students will have the flexibility to take courses from all locations as they choose. Students who attend a class at a location other than their home campus (primary attendance location) will have their total tuition and fees charged by their home campus. All financial aid will be awarded and dispersed from the home campus. The home campus monitors satisfactory progress. A copy of the consortium agreement is kept on file at each campus. Students have the right to review and acknowledge the agreement prior to taking courses at other campuses. Academic Misconduct Policy Rasmussen College’s academic misconduct policy is as follows: First Offense: Any student caught cheating will receive no credit on whatever he/she is caught cheating on and will not be allowed to redo the work. Second Offense: The student will be expelled from the course, and the final grade assigned for the course will be an ‘F/FA’. These offenses can be from two different courses, or from the same course in the same quarter. The administration reserves the right to expel a student from the College if there are more than two offenses. Aiding and abetting in cheating is considered as grave as initiating the cheating, and will be treated in the same manner. Definition of Academic Honesty: Any test or assignment which has been given to an individual to be completed independently, is completed independently without assistance from another student or others outside of the College. One of the most common forms of cheating is plagiarism. Plagiarism is defined as the intentional or unintentional use of someone else’s words or ideas without giving them proper credit and/or attempting to pass off someone else’s words as your own. Conduct/Dismissal Students are expected to conduct themselves with the same standards of behavior as are expected in the workplace and in the community at large. Consequently, the following is an all encompassing policy regarding student conduct. The College reserves the right to suspend or terminate any students whose conduct is detrimental to the educational environment. This includes, but is not limited to, conduct: • By students, faculty, or staff that is detrimental within the classroom environment. • That interferes with the well-being of the fellow students and/or faculty and staff members. • That causes damage to the appearance or structure of the College facility and/or its equipment. • By students who copy or otherwise plagiarize the assignments/projects of other students or professionals. • By students who otherwise display conduct detrimental to their own academic progress or ultimate success in the field for which they are being educated. Anti-Hazing Policy It shall be the policy of the College to strictly prohibit any action or situation which may recklessly or intentionally endanger the mental, physical health or safety of its students for the purpose of initiation or admission into or affiliation with any organization operating under the sanction of the College. This policy applies to any student or other person who may be associated with any student organization. Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action including but not limited to suspension and/or termination from school or employment. The Campus Director of the College shall be responsible for the administration of this policy. Dress Code The College encourages students to dress as if they were going to work and to start acquiring a wardrobe suitable for employment after graduation. Some Allied Health programs have uniform requirements. Please see the Campus Director or Academic Dean for details. Drop/Add Class Policy Course registration practices ensure that the College is able to provide quality instruction through obtaining a minimum class size of 12 students per course. Full-quarter drop/add period: Students may add courses through the first Friday of the quarter, which is the close of the drop/add period. When a student notifies the College of withdrawal from a class: 1. On or before the close of the drop/add period, the class will be dropped without being recorded on the student’s transcript and tuition will not be charged. 2. Following the first week of the quarter and on or before the sixth Friday of the quarter, students will receive a W/WD on their transcript. The student’s grade point average will not be affected, the credits will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. 3. Following the sixth week of the quarter, students will receive an F/FA for any classes dropped. The student’s grade point average will be affected, the credits will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. Students who fail to notify the College that they wish to withdraw from a class are still scheduled in the class, the credits for all courses will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. Mid-quarter drop/add period: Students may add courses through the second day of the mid-quarter term and may drop a course through the first Friday of the mid-quarter term, which is the close of the drop/add period. When a student notifies the College of withdrawal from a class: 1. On or before the close of the drop/add period, the class will be dropped without being recorded on the student’s transcript and tuition will not be charged. 2. Following the first week of the mid-quarter and on or before the third Friday of the quarter, students will receive a W/WD on their transcript. The student’s grade point average will not be affected, the credits will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. 3. Following the third week of the mid-quarter, students will receive an F/FA for any classes dropped. The student’s grade point average will be affected, the credits will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. Students who fail to notify the College that they wish to withdraw from a class are still scheduled in the class, the credits for all courses will be counted as cumulative credits attempted, and tuition will continue to reflect the tuition billed at the close of the drop/add period. Rasmussen College Early Start Program High School juniors and seniors have the opportunity to earn college credit through Rasmussen College’s Early Start Program. The Early Start Program is a great way for high school students to experience college while still supported by high school staff and mentors, try a course that may not be offered at the high school, or explore a possible future career by taking an introductory course. Early Start coursework is available to high school juniors and seniors on-campus or online with enrollment in the program dependent upon space availability. Students must meet the following criteria and expectations to participate in the Rasmussen College Early Start Program: • Students must have prior approval from a parent/guardian and a high school official to be admitted to the program as evidenced by a signed Early Start Application and Approval Form. • Students must complete an Application for Admission to Rasmussen College. Early Start students are not required to submit the application fee. • Students must have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 2.00 out of a possible 4.00 and achieve a minimum score of 17 on the writing portion of the STEP assessment. • Student may take up to 8 credits per quarter without a tuition charge with a maximum of 24 credits per student earned through the Early Start Program. • Students must cover the cost of textbooks and supplies for each course. Most technology courses require access to specialized hardware and software which are available to students on campus; Early Start students electing to complete these courses online will need to secure access to required hardware and software. The college can provide information about course specifics including textbooks prices and technology requirements. • Applicants will be accepted on a space available basis for each selected course. • Early Start students must meet all course prerequisites as listed in the catalog. • Courses designated with ES, LE, M, MA, ML, MT, PB, PN, PT, or ST are not available to Early Start students. • To continue enrollment in the Early Start Program, students must maintain a minimum Rasmussen College cumulative grade point average of 2.25 out of 4.00 • The application deadline is four weeks prior to the start of the intended quarter of enrollment. • Students will receive college credit toward a Bachelor’s or Associate’s Degree at Rasmussen College for all successfully completed courses. Students who elect to pursue their education at another academic institution will be issued a transcript from Rasmussen College; these credits may be transferable at the complete discretion of the receiving institution. • Students in the Early Start program will have an Early Start transcript. Students who elect to continue their education at Rasmussen College after their high school graduation will have any courses for which they received a C or higher added to their new enrollment records if the course is required for their program of study. Grades lower than a C will not be added to their college transcript. Limitations Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, course offerings, course descriptions, online courses and programs, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice. For current calendars, students should refer to a copy of the schedule of classes for the term in which they enroll. The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of Rasmussen College’s curricula. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every term and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The content of a course or program may be altered to meet particular class needs. Students who maintain continuous enrollment will be able to complete their program at Rasmussen College even if the program is discontinued. Rasmussen College reserves the right to cancel any class because of under-enrollment or non-availability of selected faculty. Many employers, certification boards, and licensing organizations require criminal background checks. Therefore, prior criminal convictions may impair one’s eligibility to sit for these exams or to secure employment in one’s chosen career field. Pharmacy Technician students convicted of non-drug-related felonies may not be eligible to sit for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) exam. Pharmacy Technician students convicted of drug- or pharmacy-related felonies ARE NOT eligible to sit for the PTCB exam. Students seeking licensing as professional peace officers in Minnesota must complete the required Law Enforcement coursework at Rasmussen College or transfer in the equivalent. In addition, these students must complete an officially recognized first aid course in First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, or Emergency Response to be eligible to sit for the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) licensing exam. Students must provide Rasmussen College with a copy of their required first aid certification (such as a copy of their first-responder card) for inclusion in the student’s file at Rasmussen College. Rasmussen College reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume the obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by Rasmussen College and relevant to any of its lawful missions, process, and functions as an educational institution and business. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 48 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Limitations Continued The administration of Rasmussen College reserves the right to address any issue in this catalog or its operations regarding its meaning. Online Courses Students may be required to take online courses in order to complete a degree. Online course activities and assignments at Rasmussen College are conducted via chat, email, message boards, and interactive websites. Tuition and fees for online courses are assessed at the same rate as for residential courses unless otherwise indicated. Online instructors receive training and support while operating in the online environment. Computer hardware and software requirements for online courses are provided to students upon enrollment. Textbooks and other resources required for online courses are available at the Rasmussen College bookstore. There are no additional admissions or testing requirements for taking an online course. However, B097 Foundations of English I is not offered online. Students who place at the level of Foundations of English I after taking the placement examination are not eligible to enroll in fully online programs until the successful completion of B097. Student Senate The Student Senate assists the College in providing a successful, positive, and rewarding atmosphere by organizing campus events. The Student Senate meets on a regular basis. Students are encouraged to participate in the open forum discussions or may petition to be one of the board representatives. The representatives include: President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary. Student Senate is open to all students, however student groups vary from campus to campus. Therefore, students should see their Campus Director for information regarding student groups. Changes in Regulations, Programs, Tuition, Book Prices, Faculty Changes in regulations, programs, tuition, book prices, and faculty may occur without notice. The College reserves the right to add or to delete certain courses, programs, or areas of study, to make faculty changes, and to modify tuition charges, interest charges, fees, and book prices. Exit Interviews Students contemplating the termination of their education at Rasmussen College should contact the Academic Dean or Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, and then the Financial Aid Department. Academic and financial aid files are not complete until both exit interviews have been completed. All students graduating or withdrawing (that have financial aid) are required to attend a mandatory exit interview. During this interview, students receive information regarding their loan(s) including address and telephone numbers of lenders, deferment requests, a list of qualifications, a sample repayment guide, loan consolidation information, and review of loan terms. The Financial Aid Department is available for your assistance for the duration of your student loan. Rasmussen College reserves the right to withhold the release of academic information, and other records, pending settlement of any amount due the College. The State of Minnesota Cancellation, Termination, Refund Policy If a student is cancelled or terminated, for whatever reason, the following apply: • Each student will be notified of acceptance/ rejection in writing. In the event a student is rejected, all tuition, fees and other charges will be refunded. A student in any term who withdraws from the College must give written notice to the College. Date of withdrawal is the last day of recorded attendance. • The College will acknowledge in writing any notice of cancellation within 10 business days after the receipt of request and will refund the amount due within 30 business days. Written notice of cancellation shall take place on the date the letter of cancellation is postmarked, or in the cases where the notice is hand carried, it shall occur on the date the notice is delivered to the College. • Notwithstanding anything to the contrary, if a student gives written notice of cancellation following written acceptance by the College and prior to the start of the period of instruction for which he/she has been charged (“Period of Instruction”), all tuition and fees paid, except the application fee, will be refunded. If any books and supplies provided by the College are not returned unused and in a condition such that they can be returned to the supplier, the student will be assessed a fee of $100 per course for these books and supplies. All prepaid tuition is refundable. • If a student has been accepted by the College and gives written notice of cancellation or termination after the start of the Period of Instruction for which they have been charged, but before completion of 75% of the Period of Instruction, the amount charged for tuition, fees, and all other charges for the completed portion of the Period of Instruction shall not exceed the pro rata portion of the total charges for tuition, fees, and all other charges that the length of the completed portion of the Period of Instruction bears to its total length, plus a $100 fee for each course enrolled. After the completion of 75% of the Period of Instruction, no refund will be made. • Student refunds are made within 45 days of the date of determination of withdrawal if the student does not officially withdraw. • The refund policy is not linked to compliance with the College’s regulations or rules of conduct. • Any promissory note instrument received as payment of tuition or other charge will not be negotiated prior to completion of 50% of the course. Re-Enter Policy Any student who withdraws from classes after the first week of the initial quarter of attendance and then elects to return on a subsequent quarter is defined as a re-enter. Re-entering students are treated as new students for the purposes of tuition, academic program requirements, and graduation standards. For the calculation of satisfactory academic progress, re-entering students are treated as continuing students and must meet progress requirements. Students enrolled in certificate, diploma, or Associate’s degree programs are allowed to re-enter the institution only one time, and students enrolled in a Bachelor’s degree program are allowed to re-enter the institution only two times, unless the Academic Dean, Campus Director, or Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations determines that extenuating circumstances exist. Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing Programs Students who wish to re-enter the Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technologist, and Nursing programs must complete a programmatic assessment in order to determine an appropriate level of re-entry. These students will be allowed to re-enter at the appropriate level if a space in the program becomes available. Return of Title IV Funds Policy If a student withdraws or is expelled, they need to visit with the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, or Academic Dean to complete the Rasmussen College Notice of Change in Student Status form, which will begin the withdrawal process. Students are allowed to convey their withdrawal verbally or in writing to the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, or Academic Dean. Rasmussen College uses the state-mandated refund policy to determine the amount of institutional charges it can retain. The federal formula dictates the amount of Federal Title IV aid that must be returned to the federal government by the school and the student. The federal formula requires a Return of Title IV aid if the student received federal financial assistance in the form of a Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, Federal Direct Student Loan, or Federal PLUS Loan and withdrew on or before completing 60% of the quarter. The percentage of Title IV aid to be returned is determined by dividing the number of calendar days remaining in the quarter by the number of total calendar days in the quarter. Scheduled breaks of five or more consecutive days are excluded. If funds are released to a student because of a credit balance on the student’s account, the student may be required to repay some of the federal grants if they withdraw. A student withdrawing from school may be eligible for post-withdrawal disbursements according to federal regulations. A post-withdrawal disbursement occurs when a student who withdraws earned more aid than had been disbursed prior to the withdrawal. Post-withdrawal disbursements are made first from available grant funds before available loan funds and must be done within 45 days of the school’s determination that the student withdrew. In addition, loan post-withdrawal disbursements must be done within 180 days of the school’s determination that the student withdrew. Rasmussen College credits the student’s account for any outstanding current period charges. If there is any remaining postwithdrawal disbursement to be made to the student, an offer is made to the withdrawn student in writing (letter sent to student) within 30 days of the school’s determination that the student withdrew. The letter explains the type and amount of fund available and explains to the student the option to accept or decline all or part of the monies. A 14-day response time is given to the student for their decision. If no response is received within the 14 days, the remaining post-withdrawal disbursement is cancelled. Federal regulations dictate the specific order in which funds must be repaid to the Title IV programs by both the school and the student, if applicable. Rasmussen College follows this mandate by refunding monies in the following sequence: Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Subsidized Stafford Loans, and PLUS Loans, Pell Grant, FSEOG, and then other Title IV programs. Rasmussen College uses the software and printed worksheets provided by the U.S. Department of Education to document the Return of Title IV Funds Calculation along with the Post-Withdrawal Disbursement Tracking Sheet. Military Leave and Refund Enlisted students who are given official orders to deploy and cannot complete the academic quarter may withdraw without penalty from any or all classes in which they are enrolled, even if the established deadline for withdrawal has passed. These students are entitled to a full refund of tuition and mandatory fees for the term, subject to applicable laws governing federal or state financial aid programs and allocation or refund as required under those programs. Students will not receive credit or a grade for classes from which they withdraw. Any tuition refund will be calculated according to federal guidelines, and any remaining balance will be returned in accordance with the student’s Excess Funds Form (completed upon enrollment). Students in good standing who withdraw under this policy may be readmitted and re-enroll under the catalog that is current at the time of re-enrollment, without penalty or redetermination of admission eligibility, within one year following their release from active military service. Programs with specialized admissions requirements are excluded from this policy; students must meet those additional requirements at the time of re-enrollment. Tuition Structure Tuition rates are as follows: New starts and re-entering students as of October 1, 2009 All courses except CC, ML, N, NM, PB, PN, ST, or W courses CC courses PN courses ML, N, NM, PB, ST, or W courses $420 per credit $295 per credit $515 per credit $535 per credit • Books and classroom resources are included in tuition as determined and distributed by the College. • Students taking 16 or more credits shall only be charged for 16 credits. • Students who maintain four courses per quarter through the entire program will not be subject to tuition increases. • Students not enrolled in an eligible program who elect to take courses without earning college credit are charged 60% of the total cost of the course, plus the cost of books and other fees effective October 1, 2009. This non-credit option is NOT available for courses beginning with CC, LE, ML, N, NM, PB, PN, ST, or W. Students who elect to complete courses on a non-credit basis are not guaranteed full technology access; however, every effort will be made to provide technology resources. Transcripts denote a ZP upon completion of the course. Students may choose to convert the ZP to a letter grade and earn credit by paying the remaining 40% of the cost of the course. • Rasmussen College offers scholarship programs to some students based on credits enrolled per quarter. Please see On-Time Graduation Scholarship and Accelerated Graduation Scholarship under Scholarship and Grant Programs for details. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 49 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Medical Leave of Absence and Medical Withdrawal Policy Medical Leave: Each leave will be for one quarter and can be extended through the following quarter. No leave may extend for more than two consecutive quarters, although there is no limit to the total number of quarters that a student may accumulate. Medical leave is intended for students who need to take time away from Rasmussen College for health reasons. Medical Withdrawals may be one of the following: 1. Medical Withdrawal: intended for students who do not plan to return to Rasmussen College. 2. Involuntary Medical Withdrawal: Initiated by campus Administration for students who are suspended or are dismissed due to conduct policy violations, or who pose a direct threat to themselves or others. Applying for a leave or withdrawal: To apply for a Medical Leave or Medical Withdrawal the student must obtain the application form from the Campus Accommodations Officer, have it signed by the appropriate person(s) and return the completed form to the Campus Accommodations Officer. When a Student Wants to Return After a Medical Leave of Absence To return from Medical Leave the student, no later than 30 days prior to the first day of classes, must contact the Campus Accommodations Officer to complete a re-admission application. Additionally, the Campus Accommodations Officer must receive a letter from the student’s professional therapist and/or physician stating the student’s medical situation and that the professional therapist/physician believes the student is able to return Rasmussen College. Students must be cleared by all of the following once the re-admission application is received: Dean of Student Learning, Financial Aid Office and Campus Director. Policy Regarding Grades in the Event of a Medical Leave of Absence or Medical Withdrawal 1. If the student takes Medical Leave or a Medical Withdrawal on or before the close of the drop/add period the course(s) will be dropped without being recorded on the student’s transcript and tuition will not be charged. 2. A grade of “W/WD” will be recorded for each course for which a student was registered if the student takes Medical Leave or Medical Withdrawal from the College at any time following the first week of the quarter. Under certain circumstances, such as a family catastrophe or substantiated medical problems, a grade of “WX” may be recorded following the end of the first week of the quarter at the discretion of the Campus Director. 3. For Medical Leave Only: An Incomplete (“I/IN”) may be given when the student has completed a percentage of the course but, for reasons beyond his or her control, has to take a Medical Leave. See Incomplete Grade Policy section of this Catalog for rules regarding receiving the grade of Incomplete. NOTE: Official transcripts will not be released by Rasmussen College until all outstanding financial obligations have been met. The usual rules for transferring credit to Rasmussen College for courses taken elsewhere while on leave will apply to any academic work done by the student while on Medical Leave or while on Medical Withdrawal from the College. All academic probations, warnings and dismissals take precedence over any Medical Leaves or Medical Withdrawals. If a student is already on probation or is placed on probation while on leave, the conditions of his or her probation are continued to the quarter in which he or she returns to the College. Involuntary Medical Withdrawal Appeal Process A student who is placed on an Involuntary Medical Withdrawal may appeal the decision to the College President within three (3) business days (excluding weekends and federal and state holidays) of the decision. The appeal should be made in writing and should set forth the basis for the appeal. The College President (or their designee) has three (3) business days from receipt of the appeal (excluding weekends and federal and state holidays) to affirm or reverse the decision, which is then considered final. The College President (or their designee) may extend the time limits set forth above as necessary. While the appeal is pending, the original decision of Campus Administration will stand. When a Student Wants to Return After an Involuntary Medical Withdrawal Re-enrollment will require a completed readmission application from the student along with a letter from the student’s professional therapist and/or physician stating the student’s medical situation and that the professional therapist/physician believes the student is able to return Rasmussen College. Students must be cleared by all of the following once the re-admission application is received: Dean of Student Learning, Financial Aid Office and Campus Director. Federal Distribution of Funds Policy Once the refund liability for a particular student has been determined, the federal portion of the refund shall be distributed back to the various programs in the following manner: • All refund monies shall first be applied to reduce the student’s Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford, Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford, and Federal Direct Plus loans received on behalf of the student. • Any remaining refund monies will then be applied to reduce the student’s Federal Pell Grant award. • Any remaining refund monies will then be applied to reduce the student’s Federal SEOG award. • Other Federal SFA Programs authorized by Title IV Higher Education Act. Non Federal Refund Distribution Policy Refunds for state aid programs are calculated on a proportional basis. To calculate the minimum refund due to the Minnesota State Grant Program, the SELF Loan Program, and other State Aid Programs (with the exception of the State Work Study Program), the following formula is used: Amount of funds (financial aid and cash) applied to institutional charges (including post-withdrawal disbursements of Title IV aid applied to institutional charges) less: Amount of institutional charges that the school can retain per our state mandated refund policy less: Amount of Institutional Share of the Title IV Refund = Remaining refund due to the State Aid Programs(*) Ratios are then determined for each of the State Financial Aid Programs as part of the total Non-Title IV financial aid disbursed to the student (for the period during which the student withdrew). These ratios are then multiplied against the remaining refund due to the State Aid Programs (*) to determine the proportional minimum refund due to both the State Grant and SELF Programs. If the student received funds from other State Aid Programs, those refunds would be calculated in the same manner. Note that for purposes of calculating institutional charges in the State Refund Calculation, the definition for Title IV programs is used. • Any remaining refund monies will then be applied to reduce the student’s Minnesota State Grant award and/or Minnesota Self Loan. • Any remaining refund monies will then be applied to any other sources. Veterans Refund In the event a veteran discontinues training for any reason, the College will retain a $10 registration fee. Any supplies or textbooks issued to and paid for by the veteran become the property of the veteran. The remaining amount of prepaid tuition will be refunded on a prorated basis computed to the date of discontinuance of training. Library Fine Policy Rasmussen College Library System reserves the right to collect late fees for Rasmussen Library materials that are kept out past the due date without renewal. The current late fee is as follows: for all circulating books, videos, audiotapes, and CD-ROMs there is a 5 day grace period; after the grace period the charge is $0.25 a day for 10 days; the maximum late fine is $2.50. For reference books and reserve materials there is a 10 hour grace period beyond the 24 hour check-out period; after the grace period the charge is $2.00 per hour for 5 hours; the maximum late fine is $10.00. After the materials are kept out past the maximum late period, the material is considered lost. The library reserves the right to charge for replacement costs. Replacement costs are assessed per each individual item. The library will charge the cost of replacing the item plus a $5.00 processing fee. In the event that nonreplaceable items are lost or damaged, the library will charge up to $100.00. Rasmussen College cannot override fines incurred at other libraries, including fines for Interlibrary Loan items lost or returned late. For unpaid fines on materials checked out on Rasmussen ID cards the College receives bills. The patrons incurring these bills should be held accountable for their payment so that the College does not have to cover fees. The College may ensure that students pay their fines at Rasmussen College library or other libraries by withholding the student’s grade report, transcript, diploma, degree or certificate. There are many instances when campus libraries may check out materials for patrons from other libraries with an institutional card. The College believes that this is an extension of its services and that it benefits the busy patron who is unclear how to navigate a variety of different library databases. When fines are incurred in these instances and the librarian is unable to get the other library to dismiss the fines, either Rasmussen College will pay the fine or the patron will be notified of the amount of the fine owed and may be held accountable by the College. Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Rasmussen College provides prospective and enrolled students and employees with its current Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act statistics. This policy contains information pertaining to the reporting procedure of criminal activities, security and access to campus facilities, campus law enforcement and criminal offenses reported to the campus or local police. As part of our campus crime prevention plan, Rasmussen College provides training in the prevention of crime, sexual harassment/violence and alcohol/drug abuse. Non-Discrimination Policy Rasmussen is strongly committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all employees and all applicants for employment. For us, this is the only acceptable way to operate our College. Rasmussen employment practices conform both with the letter and spirit of federal, state, and local laws and regulations regarding nondiscrimination in employment, compensation, and benefits. Anti – Harassment and Sexual Violence Policy It is Rasmussen College’s policy and responsibility to provide our employees and students an environment that is free from harassment. Rasmussen College expressly prohibits harassment of employees or students on the basis of gender. Harassment undermines our College community morale and our commitment to treat each other with dignity and respect. This policy is related to and is in conformity with the Equal Opportunity Policy of Rasmussen College to recruit, employ, retain, and promote employees without regard to race, color, religion, creed, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, age, physical or other disability, military or veteran status, or receipt of public assistance. Prompt investigation of allegations will be made on a confidential basis to ascertain the veracity of complaints and appropriate corrective action will be taken. An Executive Vice President or President will be notified of all allegations. This will ensure a prompt, consistent, and appropriate investigation. It is a violation of policy for any member of our College community to engage in sexual harassment and it is a violation of policy for any member of the College community to take action against an individual for reporting sexual harassment. This policy covers actions of all students and employees, whether co-worker, manager or by any other persons doing business with or for Rasmussen. Informal and Formal Complaints Members of this College community who believe they have been sexually harassed or have been the victim of sexual assault may properly turn for assistance to the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, Regional Vice President, Executive Vice President or President. Whether or not a person consults with a school official, he/she has the option of making an informal or formal complaint according to the procedures outlined below. No retaliatory actions may be taken against any person because he/she makes such a complaint or against any member of the College community who serves as an advisor or advocate for any party in any such complaint. No retaliatory actions may be taken against any member of the College community merely because he/she is or has been the object of such a complaint. Informal Resolution Early efforts to control a potentially harassing situation are very important. 1. Sometimes sexual harassment can be stopped by telling the person directly that you are uncomfortable with his or her behavior and would like it to stop. 2. Writing a letter to the person or talking to the person’s supervisor can also be effective. 3. Go to a sexual harassment/violence information center or discuss the matter with a friend. 4. Talk to others who might also be victims of harassment. 5. Any employee, faculty member, staff member, or student is encouraged to discuss incidents of possible sexual harassment with the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, Regional Vice President, or College President. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 50 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Informal Resolution Continued A Campus Director contacted by a person who may have been subjected to sexual harassment will give advice and guidance on both informal and formal procedures for solving the problem. During the informal inquiry process, all information will be kept confidential to as great a degree as legally possible. No specific circumstances, including the names of the people involved, will be reported to anyone else, except the President, Executive Vice President and the Human Resources Director and Corporate Counsel, without the written permission of the person making the complaint. However, in the course of the inquiry Rasmussen College finds that the circumstances warrant a formal investigation, it will be necessary to inform the person complained against. Incidents should be reported within 30 days. At any time during the procedures, both the person bringing a complaint and the person against whom the complaint is made may have a representative present in discussions with the Campus Director. Resolutions and Informal Complaints Anyone in the Rasmussen community may discuss an informal complaint with the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/ Director of Campus Operations, Regional Vice President, Executive Vice President or President. 1. If the person who discusses an informal complaint with an advisor is willing to be identified to others but not the person against whom the informal complaint is made, the College will make record of the circumstances and will provide guidance about various ways to resolve the problem or avoid future occurrences. While the confidentiality of the information received, the privacy of the individuals involved, and the wishes of the complaining person regarding action by the College cannot be guaranteed in every instance, they will be protected to as great a degree as is legally possible. The expressed wishes of the complaining person for confidentiality will be considered in the context of the College’s obligation to act upon the charge and the right of the charged party to obtain information. In most cases, however, confidentiality will be strictly maintained by the College and those involved in the investigation. 2. If the person bringing the complaint is willing to be identified to the person against whom the complaint is made and wishes to attempt resolution of the problem, the College will make a confidential record of the circumstances (signed by the complainant) and suggest and/or undertake appropriate discussions with the persons involved. 3. When a number of people report incidents of sexual harassment that have occurred in a public context (for instance, offensive sexual remarks in a classroom lecture) or when the College receives repeated complaints from different people that an individual has engaged in other forms of sexual harassment, the College may inform the person complained against without revealing the identity of the complaints. Definitions Sexual harassment: Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: 1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or academic advancement, 2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or academic environment, 3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or academic environment. This policy prohibits behavior such as, but not limited to: 1. Unwanted sexual advances; 2. Offering employment benefits in exchange for sexual favors; 3. Making or threatening reprisals after a negative response to sexual advances; 4. Verbal sexual advances or propositions; 5. Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, cartoons or posters (includes by electronic means); 6. Sexually offensive comments, graphic verbal commentary about an individual’s body or dress, sexually explicit jokes and innuendos, and other sexually-oriented statements; and 7. Physical conduct, such as: touching, assault, or impeding or blocking movements. Sexual harassment can occur in situations where one person has power over another, but it can also occur between equals. Both men and women can be sexually harassed. Sexual harassment can be as blatant as rape or as subtle as a touch. Harassment under the third part of the definition often consists of callous insensitivity to the experience of others. Normal, courteous, mutually respectful, pleasant, non-coercive interactions between employees, including men and women, that is acceptable to and welcomed by both parties, are not considered to be harassment, including sexual harassment. There are basically two types of sexual harassment: 1.“Quid pro quo” harassment, where submission to harassment is used as the basis for employment decisions. Employee benefits such as raises, promotions, better working hours, etc., are directly linked to compliance with sexual advances. Therefore, only someone in a supervisory capacity (with the authority to grant such benefits) can engage in quid pro quo harassment. Example: A supervisor promising an employee a raise if she goes on a date with him; a manager telling an employee she will fire him if he does not have sex with her. 2. “Hostile work environment,” where the harassment creates an offensive and unpleasant working environment. Hostile work environment can be created by anyone in the work environment, whether it be supervisors, other employees, or customers. Hostile environment harassment consists of verbiage of a sexual nature, unwelcome sexual materials, or even unwelcome physical contact as a regular part of the work environment. Cartoons or posters of a sexual nature, vulgar or lewd comments or jokes, or unwanted touching or fondling all fall into this category. For further information please refer to the EEOC’s website at www.eeoc.gov or call the EEOC Publications Distribution Center at 800-669-3362 (voice), 800-800-3302 (TTY). Sexual orientation harassment: Sexual harassment includes harassment based on sexual orientation. Sexual orientation harassment is verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his/her sexual orientation and that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to have the purpose or effect of creating a hostile work or educational environment. Romantic/sexual relationships between superior and subordinate: Substantial risks are involved even in seemingly consensual romantic/sexual relationships where a power differential exists between the involved parties. The respect and trust accorded a faculty member or other employee by a student, as well as the power exercised by faculty in giving grades, advice, praise, recommendations, opportunities for further study, or other forms of advancement may greatly diminish the student’s actual freedom of choice concerning the relationship. Similarly, the authority of the supervisor to hire, fire, evaluate performance, reward, make recommendations, assign and oversee the work activities of employees may interfere with the employee’s ability to choose freely in the relationship. Further, it is inherently risky where age, background, stature, credentials or other characteristics contribute to the perceptions that a power differential exists between the involved parties which limits the student or employee’s ability to make informed choices about the relationship. Claims of consensual romantic/sexual relationships will not protect individuals from sexual harassment charges nor guarantee a successful defense if charges are made. It is the faculty member, supervisor, or staff who will bear the burden of accountability because of his/ her special power and responsibility, and it is exceedingly difficult to use mutual consent as a defense. Therefore, all employees should be aware of the risks and consequences involved in entering a romantic/sexual relationship where there is a superior/subordinate relationship. Sexual assault: Sexual activity, including sexual penetration or sexual conduct carried out under coercion, with the threat of a weapon, through the threat of bodily harm, through a position of authority, or when the victim/survivor is mentally or physically disabled or helpless constitutes criminal sexual conduct. Having a previous relationship of any nature, including prior sexual contact with the victim/ survivor is not an accepted defense for sexual assault. The victim/survivor does not need to prove that she/he resisted and another witness is not needed to prosecute the case. The relative age of the persons involved, the victim’s/ survivor’s fear of bodily harm to self or another, the use of threat to use a weapon by the perpetrator, and the infliction of either physical or emotional anguish upon the victim/survivor are among the criteria taken into account by state laws on Criminal Sexual Conduct and under the Crime Victims Bill of Rights. Formal Complaints by Students and Employees a. A formal complaint of sexual harassment must include a written statement, signed by the complainant specifying the incident(s) of sexual harassment. The statement may be prepared by the complainant or by an advisor as a record of the complaint. The complaint must be addressed to the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/ Director of Campus Operations, or other manager who will immediately report such complaint to an Executive Vice President or President and Human Resource Director or Corporate Counsel. The Human Resource Director and/or Corporate Counsel, with the assistance of the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, or other manager will formally investigate the complaint and present the findings and recommendations to an Executive Vice President or President. b. The College will investigate formal complaints in the following manner: 1. The person who is first contacted, after initial discussions with the complainant, will inform the College specifying the individuals involved. Rasmussen will decide whether the circumstances reported in the complaint warrant a formal investigation or an informal inquiry. 2. If the circumstances warrant an investigation, Rasmussen will inform the person complained against of the name of the person making the complaint as well as of the substance of the complaint. The College will then limit the investigation to what is necessary to resolve the complaint or make a recommendation. If it is necessary for the College to speak to any people other than those involved in the complaint, they will do so only after informing the complaining person and the person complained against. 3. The College’s first priority will be to attempt to resolve the problem through a mutual agreement of the complainant and the person complained against. 4. The College will be in communication with the complainant until the complaint is resolved. The complainant will be informed of procedures being followed throughout the investigation although not of the specific conversations held with the person complained against. 5. The College will resolve complaints expeditiously. To the extent possible, the College will complete its investigation and make its recommendations within 60 days from the time the formal investigation is initiated. 6. If a formal complaint has been preceded by an informal inquiry, the College will decide whether there are sufficient grounds to warrant a formal investigation. c. After an investigation of the complaint the College will: 1. Look at all the facts and circumstances surrounding the allegations to determine if there is reasonable cause to believe that harassment as occurred and report its findings and the resolution to an Executive Vice President or President; or 2. Report its findings with appropriate recommendations for corrective action to an Executive Vice President or President; or 3. Report to an Executive Vice President or President its finding that there is insufficient evidence to support the complaint. Following receipt of the report, the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations or will report their findings to an Executive Vice President or President with appropriate recommendations and may take further action as they deem necessary, including the initiation of disciplinary proceedings. Retaliation. It is a violation of Rasmussen’s policies to retaliate against anyone who makes a good faith claim of a suspected violation of its policies about inappropriate behavior or participates in an investigation. Complaints of retaliation (actual, threatened or feared) should be directed to the Campus Director. Complaint Process. If a party to a complaint does not agree with its resolution, that party may appeal to Corporate Counsel. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 51 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Recommended Corrective Action The purpose of any recommended corrective action to resolve a complaint will be to correct or to remedy the injury, if any, to the complainant and to prevent further harassment. Recommended action may include counseling; a written or verbal reprimand of the harasser; suspension, dismissal, demotion, or transfer of the harasser; a change of grade or other academic record for a student who has been the victim of harassment; or other appropriate action. Any action to suspend or to dismiss a member of the staff or faculty is solely within the authority of the Campus Director, Regional Vice President, Executive Vice President, President, or the Chief Executive Officer. False Charges If it is determined in any way that a complaint was made by an employee or a student with the knowledge that the facts were false, an Executive Vice President or the President will be notified. The Executive Vice President or President may recommend appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including suspension from the College or termination of employment or enrollment. Sexual Violence Rasmussen College expects that all employees and students will conduct themselves in a responsible manner that shows respect for others and the community at large. The same behavioral standards apply to all individuals. As part of the larger community we are subject to, abide by, and support federal, state and local statutes and ordinances regarding criminal sexual conduct. Sexual assault is an act of aggression and coercion, not an expression of sexual intimacy. We will do whatever possible to offer safety, privacy, and support to the victim/survivor of sexual assault. Helping the victim/survivor look at options for reporting the assault and taking care of herself/himself is the immediate concern of the College. The College will assist the victim/survivor in contacting an appropriate agency if such assistance is desired. If the assault takes place at any Rasmussen Campus or facility, the victim/survivor should immediately contact the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, Regional Vice President, Executive Vice President or President. Administrators are not to reveal the name of the victim/survivor unless he/she chooses to be identified. The administrative office at each Campus shall, at all times, have readily available the name(s) of local law enforcement agencies and sexual assault centers that are to be called for immediate help. If the assault takes place outside the College Campus or other Rasmussen facility, the victim/ survivor should immediately contact, or have a friend contact, the local law enforcement and sexual assault center. Following the incident the victim/survivor should notify the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, of the assault for support and assistance. Further, in either case, the victim/survivor should do the following: 1. It is helpful to have a written summary of what happened while the memory is still clear. 2. No attempt should be made to bathe, change clothes, or otherwise clean up prior to examination by a medical practitioner qualified to make determinations regarding sexual assault. 3. In most cases it will be helpful to have a friend with you when talking to the local law enforcement officials or sexual assault center personnel. Victims’ Rights Under Sexual Assault Policy If the assault is alleged to have been committed by a member of our college community on property owned by the Rasmussen the following additional policy applies: 1. The victim is aware that criminal charges can be made with local law enforcement officials; 2. The prompt assistance of campus administration, or Rasmussen management at the request of the victim, in notifying the appropriate law enforcement officials of a sexual assault incident; 3. A sexual assault victim’s participation in and the presence of the victim’s attorney or other support person at any campus or college facility disciplinary proceeding concerning a sexual assault complaint; 4. Notice to a sexual assault victim of the outcome of any campus or college facility disciplinary proceeding concerning a sexual assault complaint, consistent with laws relating to data practices; 5. The complete and prompt assistance of campus administration, or Rasmussen management at the direction of law enforcement authorities, in obtaining, securing, and maintaining evidence in connection with a sexual assault incident; 6. The assistance of campus administration or Rasmussen management in preserving, for a sexual assault complaint or victim, materials relevant to a campus disciplinary proceeding; 7. The assistance of campus and/or other Rasmussen personnel, in cooperation with the appropriate law enforcement authorities, at a sexual assault victim’s request, in shielding the victim from unwanted contact with the alleged assailant, including transfer of the victim to alternative classes; and 8. Further information can be obtained from either of the following sources: Minnesota Department of Human Rights 190 E 5th Street, Suite 700 St. Paul, MN 55101 1-800-657-3704 • (651) 296-5663 TTY (651) 296-1283 http://www.humanrights.state.mn.us/ Office of Justice Programs (651) 201-7310 • (800) 247-0390 Website: www.ojp.state.mn.us 9. The campus administration will inform victims of their rights under the Crime Victims Bill of Rights, including the right to assistance from the Office of the Crime Victim Ombudsman and the Crime Victims Reparations Board. For further information refer to the Office of the Crime Victim Ombudsman website at http://www.ojp.state.mn.us/ (651-642-0550) or the Crime Victims Reparations Board website at http://www.ojp.state.mn.us/MCCVS/ (651-282-6256). Nothing in this policy shall prevent the complainant or the respondent from pursuing formal legal remedies or resolution through state of federal agencies or the courts. Drug Abuse Policy Rasmussen College is committed to providing a safe, drug-free environment for its students and employees and to protecting its business from unnecessary financial loss due to drug or other intoxicant use among its employees. This policy is based in substantial part on Rasmussen’s concern regarding the safety, health and welfare of its employees and their families, its students and the community. Consistent with this commitment, Rasmussen College strictly prohibits: 1. The presence of employees or students on campus or in corporate offices while under the influence of intoxicants, drugs or any other controlled substances. 2. The use, manufacturing, furnishing, possession, transfer, or trafficking of intoxicants, illegal drugs, or controlled substances in any amount, in any manner, or at any time on Rasmussen College campuses or in Rasmussen College corporate offices. Rasmussen College has the right to: 1. Discipline employees, including dismissal, for felony convictions regarding illegal use, possession or trafficking of drugs. 2. Take disciplinary action against employees who violate this policy. Employees may also be suspended pending outcome of an investigation regarding compliance with this policy. Drug-Free School and Workplace In accordance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, 34 CFR Part 86, this institution is hereby declared a drug- and alcohol-free college and workplace. For more information visit The U. S. Department of Education’s Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention website at www.edc.org/hec. Students and Employees are prohibited from the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of a controlled substance or alcohol anywhere on property belonging to the College including grounds, parking areas, anywhere within the building(s), or while participating in College-related activities. Students and Employees who violate this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion or termination of employment. As a condition of employment, employees must abide by the terms of this policy or the College will take one or more of the following actions within 30 days with respect to any employee who violates this policy by: 1. Reporting the violation to law enforcement officials. 2. Taking appropriate disciplinary action against such employee, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment. 3. Requiring such employee to participate in a substance abuse rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a federal, state, local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency. In compliance with the law, this institution will make a good faith effort to maintain a drugand alcohol-free college and work place through implementation of the preceding policy and will establish and maintain a drug- and alcohol-free awareness program. Fact sheets associated with unlawful use, possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol may be obtained from the Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations, or the Human Resources Department. Rasmussen College considers these fact sheets an integral part of the Drug-Free College and Workplace Policy. The Federal Government has taken a number of legal steps to curb drug abuse and distribution. These anti-drug laws affect several areas of our lives. For instance, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, which provides public housing funds, has the authority to evict residents found to be involved in drug related crimes on or near the public housing premises. Businesses with federal contracts are subject to a loss of those contracts if they do not promote a drug-free environment. In our particular situation, students involved with drugs could lose their eligibility for financial aid. Further, they could also be denied other federal benefits, disability, retirement, health, welfare, and Social Security. Finally, a record of a felony or conviction in a drug-related crime may prevent a person from entering certain career fields. Drugs and alcohol are highly addictive and injurious to the person and can cause harmful effects to virtually every aspect of a person’s life, i.e., relationships, family, job, school, physical, and emotional health. People who use drugs and alcohol may lose their sense of responsibility, become restless, irritable, paranoid, depressed, inattentive, anxious, or experience sexual indifference, loss of physical coordination and appetite, go into a coma, experience convulsions, or even death. Persons who use drugs and alcohol face not only health risks, but their ability to function in their personal and professional lives can be impaired as well. Some examples of this are a hangover, or a feeling of being “burnt out”, being preoccupied with plans for the next drink, or “high” or slowed reflexes that can be especially dangerous while driving. Alcohol related driving deaths are the top killer of 15 to 24 year olds. There are danger signals that could indicate when someone is in trouble with drugs or alcohol: • inability to get along with family or friends • uncharacteristic temper flare-ups • increased “secret” type behavior • abrupt changes in mood or attitude • resistance to discipline at home or school • getting into a “slump” at work or school • increased borrowing of money • a complete set of new friends We recommend that any person observing any of the above changes in any student or employee of Rasmussen College immediately notify their Campus Director, Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations or the Human Resources Department. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Amended 10/01 to include the USA Patriot Act The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the institution receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, business office, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The institution will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 52 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Continued 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the institution to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Campus Director, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the institution decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the institution will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the institution in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the institution has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 4. The right to disclose – without the written consent or knowledge of the student or parent – personally identifiable information from the student’s education records to the Attorney General of the United States or to his/her designee in response to an ex parte order in connection with the investigation or prosecution of terrorism crimes specified in sections 2332b(g)(5)(B) and 2331 of title 18, U.S. Code. In addition, the institution is not required to record the disclosure of such information in the student’s file. Further, if the institution has provided this information in good faith in compliance with an ex parte order issued under the amendment it is not liable to any person for the disclosure of this information. 5. The right to disclose – without the written consent or knowledge of the student or parent – information from a student’s education records in order to comply with a “lawfully issued subpoena or court order in three contexts. a. Grand Jury Subpoenas – The institution may disclose education records to the entity or persons designated in a Federal Grand Jury Subpoena. In addition, the court may order the institution not to disclose to anyone the existence or context of the subpoena or the institution’s response. b. Law Enforcement Subpoenas – The institution may disclose education records to the entity or persons designated in any other subpoena issued for a law enforcement purpose. As with Federal Grand Jury Subpoenas, the issuing court or agency may, for good cause shown, order the institution not to disclose to anyone the existence or contents of the subpoena or the institution’s response. Notification requirements nor recordation requirements apply. c. All Other Subpoenas – The institution may disclose information pursuant to any other court order or lawfully issued subpoena only if the school makes a reasonable effort to notify the parent or eligible student of the order or subpoena in advance of compliance, so that the parent of student may seek protective action. The institution will record all requests for information from a standard court order or subpoena. 6. The right to disclose – without the written consent or knowledge of the student or parent – information in education records to “appropriate parties in connection with an emergency, if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health and safety of the student or other individuals.” Imminent danger of student or others must be present. 7. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC, 20202-4605. Directory Information Directory Information is that information which may be unconditionally released without the consent of the student unless the student has specifically requested that the information not be released. The school requires that such requests be made in writing to the Director of the school within fifteen (15) days after the student starts classes. Directory Information includes: Student’s name, date of birth, address(es); course of study; extracurricular activities; degrees and/or awards received; last school attended; dean’s list or equivalent; attendance status (full-time, parttime) and dates of attendance (the period of time a student attends or attended Rasmussen College not to include specific daily records of attendance). Students may restrict the release of Directory Information except to school officials with legitimate educational interests and others as outlined above. To do so, a student must make the request in writing to the Business Office. Once filed this becomes a permanent part of the student’s record until the student instructs the institution, in writing, to have the request removed. Grievance Policy It is the policy of Rasmussen College that students should have an opportunity to present school related complaints through grievance procedures. The College will attempt to resolve promptly all grievances that are appropriate for handling under this policy. An appropriate grievance is defined as a student’s expressed feeling of dissatisfaction regarding any interpretation or application of school-related policies or the College’s personnel. Students should notify the College in a timely fashion of any grievance considered appropriate for handling under this policy. As used in this policy the terms “timely fashion,” “reasonable time,” and “promptly” will mean ten days. Students are assured that no adverse action will be taken by the College or any of its representatives for registering a grievance. Grievance Procedure In the event an applicant, student, graduate, former student, other party who has dealings with the College feels his/her rights have been violated, the following procedures should be followed: 1. The individual must first try to resolve the issue with the other member involved. 2. If the matter is not resolved to the person’s satisfaction he/she has the option to follow the appropriate steps: a. Requests for further action on educational issues should be made to the Academic Dean. The Dean will investigate the grievance, attempt to resolve it, and issue a decision to the student. b. Students who feel they have an appropriate non-academic grievance should see the Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations for their campus. The Associate Campus Director/Director of Campus Operations will investigate the grievance, attempt to resolve it, and issue a decision to the student. c. If the grievance is still not resolved, students should contact the Campus Director for their campus. The Campus Director will review the previous discussions, conduct additional investigation if necessary, attempt to resolve the grievance, and issue a decision to the student.. Students or other interested parties may also contact: • Minnesota Office of Higher Education 1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350 St. Paul, MN 55108-5227 (651) 642-0567 • State of Wisconsin Education Approval Board 30 West Mifflin Street Madison, WI 53708-8696 (608) 266-1996 • The Higher Learning Commission (www.ncahlc.org), a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North La Salle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Il 60602-2504 (312) 263-0456. Appeal Procedure Rasmussen College recognizes the rights of applicants, students, graduates, former students, and other parties who have dealings with the College as they relate to due process in matters of alleged violation of policies, procedures, and guidelines of the institution. Individuals who feel they have been unjustly treated can request the Campus Director to hear their grievance. If individuals wish to appeal a decision or request a hearing for any other perceived violation of rights, written statements of appeal must be submitted to the Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs and/ or the Vice President of Operations within 15 calendar days of the issue in question. Response will be given within 30 days. Arbitration Any controversy or claim arising out of, or relating to a current or former student’s recruitment by, enrollment in, or education at Rasmussen College (“Controversy or Claim”), shall be resolved first in accordance with the procedures in the Grievance Policy published in the then current Rasmussen College catalog. If, following completion of the Grievance Policy procedures, any current or former student (the “Student”) or Rasmussen College remains dissatisfied, then the Controversy or Claim, in accordance with the Enrollment Agreement, shall be resolved by binding arbitration administered in accordance with the Commercial Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association then in effect. Arbitration shall be the sole remedy for resolution of any Controversy or Claim which is not satisfactorily resolved in accordance with the procedures in the Grievance Policy published in the then current Rasmussen College catalog. Unless the Student and Rasmussen College agree otherwise, the arbitration shall take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota, before a single neutral arbitrator. The Federal Arbitration Act shall govern the arbitration to the fullest extent possible, excluding all state arbitration laws. Judgment on the award rendered by the arbitrator may be entered in any court having jurisdiction thereof. The arbitrator shall have no authority to award punitive damages, consequential or indirect damages, or other damages not measured by the prevailing party’s actual damages. The arbitrator also shall have no authority to award attorney’s fees or to collectively arbitrate any Controversy or Claim of or against more than one Student regardless of whether or how many other similarly circumstanced Students there may be. The Student and Rasmussen College shall bear an equal share of the arbitrator’s fees and administrative costs of arbitration charged by the American Arbitration Association but otherwise the Student and Rasmussen College shall bear their own costs and expenses of the arbitration, including attorney’s fees. Except as may be required by law, no party to the arbitration nor an arbitrator may disclose the existence, content, or results of any arbitration hereunder without the prior written consent of both the Student and Rasmussen College. Disclosure Policy Availability of financial information regarding the College may be requested from the Chief Financial Officer. Statement of Ownership Rasmussen College, Inc., is a private corporation under the laws of the State of Delaware. Rasmussen College, Inc. is the parent company of the Rasmussen College system of schools with campuses located in the States of Florida, Illinois, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. Corporate Officers: – Robert E. King, Chairman – J. Michael Locke, President, Chief Executive Officer, Secretary – Susan Falotico, Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Assistant Secretary – Kristi A. Waite, Executive Vice President, President of Rasmussen College – Craig E. Pines, Executive Vice President R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 53 ACADEmiC iNFoRmATioN AND CollEGE PoliCiES Accreditation, Licensing & Approvals Accreditation: Registration: Rasmussen College is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions. • Minnesota Office of Higher Education 1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350 St. Paul, MN 55108-5227 (651) 642-0567 Licensing Rasmussen College is licensed as a private career school with the State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board. Licensure is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions. The education programs may not meet the needs of every student or employer. • State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board 30 West Mifflin Street Madison, WI 53708-8696 (608) 266-1996 The State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board has approved all of Rasmussen College’s programs except the Surgical Technologist AAS and the Law Enforcement AAS degree and certificates. Approved For: • Veterans’ Benefits by the Minnesota State Approving Agency 30 N. La Salle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504 (800) 621-7440 or (312) 263-0456; The Health Information Technician associate’s degree offered at the Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Eden Prairie, Lake Elmo, Mankato, Rockford, and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). The Health Information Technician associate’s degree offered at the Green Bay campus is in Candidacy Status for accreditation by the Commission on Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). • Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education 233 N. Michigan Ave.,21st Floor Chicago, IL 60601-5800 (312) 233-1100 The Medical Assisting program at the Brooklyn Park, Eagan, Eden Prairie, Mankato, and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). • Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727) 210-2350 The Surgical Technologist AAS program at the Brooklyn Park and St. Cloud campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). • Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL (727) 210-2350 Programs or campuses not listed above are not programmatically accredited. Standards of Satisfactory Progress For Institutional and Financial Aid Guidelines Satisfactory Academic Progress is defined as progression through an academic program within a prescribed time frame. Lack of satisfactory progress may jeopardize the students’ ability to complete their program. Rasmussen College expects students to progress through programs based on the satisfactory progression standards listed here. Credit Information A full-time student must be enrolled for and successfully complete a minimum of 12 credit hours per quarter of attendance. A threequarter time student must be enrolled for and successfully complete a minimum of 9, 10, or 11 credit hours per quarter of attendance. A half-time student must be enrolled for and successfully complete a minimum of 6, 7, or 8 credit hours per quarter of attendance. The exception to this is that as of July 1, 1992, the Minnesota State Grant Program adopted the policy whereby 15 credit hours per quarter constitutes full-time attendance. There are nine additional levels of eligibility below that, to a minimum of 3 credit hours per quarter. Definition of an Academic Year is a Minimum Of: 36 Quarter Credits 30 Weeks Standards of Academic Progress Mid-quarter and final grade reports are available to all students. Cumulative grade point averages and successful course completion of credits attempted are monitored quarterly. All grades relate to credits successfully completed with the exception of the “W/WD” and “U/UN” which is counted as an attempted course for the purpose of maximum time frame and percentage of course completion and may have an effect on achieving satisfactory progress. Courses which have been transferred from other institutions will be listed on the student’s transcript with a “TR” designation. Courses for which a student has received credit by examination will be listed as “TO” (Test-Out) on the student’s transcript. Grade points from institutions other than Rasmussen College and credit by examination will not be computed in the Rasmussen College grade point average, but they will be counted as credits attempted and earned for determining Satisfactory Progress. All credits that are considered to be earned toward program completion, including test-out, transfer, and course waiver credits, are therefore also treated as credits attempted. All students must comply with the following components, which are used to measure a student’s Satisfactory Progress (SAP) towards the completion of a degree or certificate. The components are: 1. A Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) consistent with graduation requirements. 2. Duration of eligibility, or maximum time frame for program completion, which is equal to 1.5 times the number of total credits required for program completion. 3. Cumulative Completion Rate (CCR) Duration of eligibility, or maximum time frame for program completion, is a period equal to 1.5 times the number of credits required for program completion. Total credits are indicated by each program listing in the catalog. Credits accepted for transfer into the College and credits earned by examination are considered as part of the credits attempted and earned, and as part of the total credits required, for purposes of determining the maximum program time frame and duration of eligibility. A student cannot exceed 1.5 times the maximum time frame. A Cumulative Completion Rate (CCR) is determined as follows: Cumulative credits earned / cumulative credits attempted in a program. Credits accepted for transfer into the College and credits earned by examination are considered as part of the credits attempted and earned for CCR calculation. The table below lists the minimum CCR: Percentage of credits attempted toward maximum credit time frame • Up to 25% • Greater than 25%, up to 50% • Greater than 50% Minimum credits successfully completed of total credits attempted • 25% • 50% • 67% If a student’s CGPA falls below a 2.00, or they fail to meet the CCR (the necessary percentage of attempted/earned credits), or duration of eligibility requirements, the student is placed on academic warning during the subsequent quarter. After counseling, the student signs an agreement to the conditions of the warning period. During the academic warning period, eligibility for financial aid continues. A student who does not meet the 2.00 CGPA, CCR, or duration of eligibility requirements at the end of the academic warning period will be placed on academic probation. Students who are placed on academic probation do not receive financial aid. At the end of the academic probation period a student must meet the 2.0 CGPA and required percentage of attempted / earned credits, or duration of eligibility. Students who fail to meet the terms of probation will be terminated from the college. Mitigating Circumstances: Academic Probation and Termination from college, due to probationary status may be appealed to the Academic Review Committee. This committee is composed of the Academic Dean and two instructors who will determine if mitigating circumstances apply. All appeals must be made in writing addressing the nature of the circumstances that warrant exception to the policy stated above. All appeals are reviewed and ruled on within five business days. Students will be notified in writing regarding the outcome of the appeal. The ruling of the committee is final and cannot be appealed. Should a student choose to transfer from one program to another, only the grades and credits that apply to the new program will be calculated in the student’s CGPA and CCR. Students who withdraw from the institution and later re-enter the College in the same program will continue at the same satisfactory progress and evaluation points in effect at the time of withdrawal. Satisfactory Progress calculations for re-entering students who change programs will include only the grades and credits attempted and earned for courses that are part of the student’s new program; standard CCR requirements will be followed from the re-entry point and for each quarter thereafter. Courses dropped during the drop/add period do not count toward CCR. The following will not be considered as credits successfully completed or earned: F/FA, U/UN, W/WD, I/IN. In addition, Foundations courses are not included in the maximum number of credits attempted or successfully completed toward completion of the degree when assessing satisfactory progress. Students who fail a class are allowed to repeat the class one time. The credits are counted in the financial aid award. Students who wish to repeat a course, and have earned above a failing grade, are responsible for paying for the class out of pocket in this instance. These credits cannot be included in the student’s financial aid award. Failed course credits count as credits attempted that are not earned. If a student repeats a failed course, the failing grade will be removed and replaced with the grade from the course when repeated and the student’s CGPA will be recalculated to reflect the new letter grade. A Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) equal to or greater than 2.00 is required for graduation. In addition, at the end of the second academic year (6 quarters), students must have a CGPA equal to or greater than 2.00 to be making satisfactory academic progress. R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 54 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 FACulTy AND STAFF central Office Kristi A. Waite President, Rasmussen College B.A., Concordia University John Woods Vice President of Academic Affairs Ph.D., Bowling Green State University M.A., B.A., Carleton University – Canada Patrick Branham Chief Financial Officer M.B.A., University of Chicago CPA, B.S., Illinois State University Laureen Cahill Vice President of Region 1 J.D., B.A., Loyola University Chicago Tawnie L. Cortez Vice President of Operations B.A., Montana State University Greta Ferkel Vice President of EdVantage M.M.Ed., University of North Texas B.M.E., University of Hartford George Fogel Vice President of Compliance and Financial Services M.B.A., University of Chicago B.A., DePauw University Susan M. Hammerstrom Vice President of Student Recruitment B.S., St. Cloud State University Bob King, Jr. Vice President of Marketing M.B.A., Northwestern University B.A., DePauw University Eric Rasmussen Vice President of Region 4 M.Ed., B.S., University of Minnesota Larry A. Waite Vice President of Real Estate M.A., University of St. Thomas B.S., Metropolitan State University Shawn Walden Vice President of Region 3 B.S., Emporia State University Greg Witte Vice President of Region 2 B.M.E., Central Missouri State University Academic Administration John Woods, Vice President of Academic Affairs Ph.D., Bowling Green State University M.A., B.A., Carleton University – Canada Matthew Segaard, Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs Ph.D., University of Minnesota M.A., Ohio University M.A., B.A., Bowling Green State University Naomi Mogard, Dean of Faculty M.S., St. Cloud State University B.A., B.A., Concordia College Shawn Schulte, Manager of Student Learning M.S., B.S., University of Minnesota – Twin Cities Elizabeth Hurley-Felling, Dean of Faculty M.S., Capella University M.A., St. Mary’s University B.A., University of St. Thomas A.A.S., El Central College Meghana Shroff, Manager of Student Learning B.A., Illinois School of Professional Psychology Brooks Doherty, Dean of Faculty M.A., University College London B.A., University of Minnesota Twin Cities Twin Cities Sara Hjelle, Dean of Faculty M.A., College of St. Scholastica B.S., University of North Dakota Christina Salmon, Manager of Student Learning M.A., St. Mary’s University B.S., University of Wisconsin – River Falls Donna Wenkel, Dean of Faculty M.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato B.S., Mankato State University Claudia Fortney, Assistant to the Dean B.S., A.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato Ryan Brovold, Dean of Faculty M.S., University of North Dakota M.S., B.A., Bemidji State University Mary Swingle, Dean of Student Learning M.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse B.S., University of Wisconsin – Superior Ann Morgan, Dean of Faculty M.A., University of Minnesota – Twin Cities B.A., University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire Carrie Daninhirsch, Dean of Student Learning M.S., Lesley College B.S., Northeastern University campus Administration Cathy Wogen, Director of Campus Operations B.S., St. Cloud State University Douglas Gardner, Bench Campus Director B.A., Buena Vista College Dwayne Bertotto, Campus Director B.S., University of Wisconsin – Superior Erin Green, Director of Campus Operations B.S., University of Minnesota Tammy Jackson, Campus Director B.S., Southwest State University Lamont Allen, Director of Campus Operations B.A., University of Wisconsin - Madison Patty Sagert, Campus Director B.A., Metropolitan State University Tara Carr, Director of Campus Operations M.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University B.S., Bowling Green State University Phillip Kagol, Campus Director B.S., St. Cloud State University Jodi Black, Director of Campus Operations M.Ed., Ohio University B.S., University of Wisconsin John Pappas, Campus Director M.B.A., B.S., Indiana University Dean Fredericks, Associate Campus Directors A.A.S., Rasmussen College Liz Rian, Campus Director B.A., Northwestern College Certificate, St. Cloud Business College Robin Robatcek, Associate Campus Director B.A., Concordia University Donald J. Devito, Jr., Campus Director B.S., Excelsior College Jon P. Peterson, Campus Director B.A., University of St. Thomas Seth Grimes, Director of Campus Operations M.B.A., Benedictine University B.S., University of Alabama Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Twin Cities Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Online Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 55 FACulTy AND STAFF School of Allied Health Lorrie Laurin, Director, School of Allied Health B.A., Carthage College Cynthia Glewwe, RHIA, Health Science Curriculum Coordinator M.Ed., Capella University B.A., College of St. Scholastica Tammy Renner, Medical Laboratory Technician Program Director M.S., University of North Dakota B.S., Minot State University Jeremy Barthels D.O.C., Northwestern Chiropractic College B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse Nadine Bengs, CST, Surgical Technologist Program Coordinator A.A.S., Bismarck State College Diploma, St. Cloud Technical College Certificate of Surgical Technology - State of Minnesota Pre-Nursing, St. Cloud State College Phil Gore Certificate, Brian Utting School of Massage Amanda Jackson, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator A.A.S., High Tech Institute Morgan Meyer, CST, Surgical Technologist Clinical Coordinator Diploma, Kirkwood Community College Aaron Mullally, EPC M.A., College of St. Scholastica B.S., University of Wisconsin – Superior Certificate, American College of Sports Medicine Georgina Sampson, RHIA B.S., Viterbo University Colleen Flaherty A.A.S., Century College A.S., Normandale Community College Deborah Honstad, RHIA B.A., College of St. Scholastica Beth Salo M.S., Capella University B.A., College of St. Scholastica Lynn Skafte, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator B.A., College of St. Scholastica A.A.S., Duluth Business University Willoe Traver, CMT M.Ac., Northwestern Health Sciences University B.A., Metropolitan State University Terry Clements, CMT M.A., Georgia State University B.A., St. Olaf College Certificate, Atlanta School of Massage David Farrar B.A., Augsburg College Amanda Steinhoff, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator A.A.S., Minnesota West Community and Technical College Brenda Carlson, MT (ASCP) Medical Laboratory Technician Program Coordinator B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse Greg DeNunzio D.C., Northwestern Health Sciences University B.S., Pennsylvania State University Breanne Larson, MT (ASCP) B.S., University of Minnesota Angela Mason, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator Diploma, Century College Twin Cities Twin Cities Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Laurie Bjerklie, MT (ASCP) Medical Laboratory Technician Program Coordinator B.S., University of North Dakota Kathy Carson, RHIA A.A.S., Western Wisconsin Tech College Darla Hiller Kellner M.S., Minnesota State University – Mankato B.A.S., University of Minnesota – Duluth Cristen Olinger, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator A.A.S., Dakota County Technical College Mary Tilley, CMT Certificate, Sister Rosalind Gefre School of Massage Cassie Woodward, CMT A.A.S., Riverland Community College Certificate, Sister Rosalind Gefre School of Massage Kevin Babcock M.S., B.A., St. Cloud State University Lori Groinus, Surgical Technologist Program Coordinator B.S., St. Cloud State University Surgical Technology Diploma, St. Cloud Technical College Katherine Hogenson, RHIT A.A.S., Rasmussen College A.S., Winona State University Lisa Ludescher, CMA, Medical Assisting Program Coordinator A.A.S., Anoka Technical College Janice Smith, CMT Diploma, Touch of Life School of Massage Diploma, St. Cloud Technical College Elizabeth Sobiech, MT (ASCP) Medical Laboratory Technician Program Coordinator B.S., University of Cincinnati A.A.S., Alexandria Technical College Danika Brinda M.S., B.A., College of St. Scholastica Tina Reynoso, RHIA, CHPS Health Information Technician Program Coordinator B.A., Metropolitan State University A.A.S., Moorhead State University Marilyn Tramontin B.S., University of Minnesota Brenda Wood, CCS-P, CCS, CPht B.S., University of Minnesota Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Online Online Online Online Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 56 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 FACulTy AND STAFF School of business Kathy Heldman, Director, School of Business J.D., M.S., Syracuse University B.A., University of Michigan Soma Jurgensen M.B.A., St. Thomas University B.A., University of Minnesota Michelle Laumb M.B.A., University of St. Thomas B.S., St. Cloud State University Kari Grittner, CPA B.S., University of Wisconsin - Stout Barbara Hentges B.S., University of Minnesota Antar Salim M.B.A., Southern Illinois University B.S., University of Michigan Melonie Sebring M.A., St. Mary’s University B.S., Kansas State University Jason Cussler M.B.A., University of Minnesota B.A., Middleburg College Tom Hakko M.B.A., B.S., Cardinal Stritch University Daniel Deschaine M.B.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato B.S., Michigan Technological University Claudia Fortney B.S., A.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato Jackie Lemke M.S., B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Gabriel Stenzel B.A., St. John’s University Margaret Stenzel M.B.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato B.A., College of St. Benedict Linda Beuning B.S., St. Cloud State University Karen Krych B.S., St. Cloud State University Tom LeNeau, CPA (Inactive) M.B.A., Arizona State University B.Ac, University of Minnesota - Duluth M.E.D., University of Minnesota B.S., St. Cloud State University Gregor Rolek B.A., Loras College Peggy Sullivan B.S., University of Wisconsin - Superior Marty Toole Ph.D., Capella University M.S., Chapman University B.S., Wayland Baptist University Randy Bauman M.S., University of Phoenix B.A., University of Pittsburgh Amy Chantry J.D., Valparaiso University B.A., Concordia College – Moorhead Sherry Kamrowski B.S., Winona State University Jason Meldrum M.A., St. Mary’s University B.A., Brigham Young University Nicole Runyon M.S., Central Michigan University B.A., Ohio State University Andy Thraen M.B.A., Metropolitan State University B.A., University of Minnesota Melany Wynn, Business Program Coordinator M.B.A., Augsburg College B.S., Northwestern College School of education Cecelia Westby, Director, Early Childhood Education Ed.D., University of Minnesota M.S., Concordia University B.S., University of Minnesota Tracy Tepley, Early Childhood Education Program Coordinator B.S., North Dakota State University Regina Jackson M.A., B.A., Concordia University Tammy Hopps B.A., University of Minnesota Michelle Beedle M.A., Concordia University B.A., Marquette University School of justice Studies Carie Ann Potenza, Director, School of Justice Studies M.A., Rutgers University B.A., University of Albany Carlo Carlotta M.A., B.S., Western Illinois University Leslie Palmer M.S., Capella University B.A., St. Cloud State University Gabe Berntson, Paralegal Program Coordinator J.D., Hamline University B.A., University of St. Thomas Matthew Petz, Law Enforcement POST Coordinator M.A., St. Mary’s University B.E.S., St. Cloud State University Robert Sutter M.S., B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Rose Pogatshnik M.S., B.S., St. Cloud State University Katharine Hatch J.D., University of Minnesota B.A., Mount Holyoke College Monica Mauri M.A., Liberty University B.A., Florida International University Kirk Olson J.D., B.A., University of Minnesota School of Nursing Bradley Moore, RN, Director, School of Nursing B.S.N., University of South Alabama Cheryl Pratt, RN, Regional Dean of Nursing M.A., Nursing College of St. Scholastica - Duluth B.S.N., Winona State University Jodi Zastrow, Dean of Nursing M.S.N., Walden University B.S.N., Mankato State University Cate Christensen, NP M.S.N., University of Illinois B.S., Northern Illinois University A.A.S., Kishwaukee College Dana Feld, RN, Dean of Nursing M.S., University of Minnesota B.E.S., St. Cloud State University Laurette Hendrickson, RN, Dean of Nursing B.S., Minnesota State University – Mankato A.A., Rochester Community College Ruth Furan, RN B.S.N., B.S., Minnesota State University – Mankato Deborah Matzke-Lewis, RN B.S.N., Mankato State University Jan Weber A.A., Rochester Community and Technical College Lori Steffen, Dean of Nursing M.S.N., Walden University B.S.N., South Dakota State University Jennifer Peterson B.S., College of St. Benedict Chicago Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Eagan Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Eden Prairie Aurora Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Mankato St. Cloud Online Online Online Orlando Mankato Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Brooklyn Park Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 57 FACulTy AND STAFF School of technology and design Hap Aziz, Director, School of Technology and Design M.S., Nova Southeastern University B.A., Rollins College John Mindiola B.F.A., University of Wisconsin – Stout Todd Jerde A.A.S., School of Communication Arts Brad Copeland B.A., Augsburg College Eric Melhorn B.A., Concordia University A.A., Minnesota State University – Mankato James Alberts B.S., St. Cloud State University Anita Hendrickx B.S., St. Cloud State University Mark Kroska, MCP Kristy Mize B.F.A., California State University at Fullerton Tom Wieber B.A., College of St. Scholastica Charlene Weatherford M.S., Nova Southeastern University B.A., Newberry College Orlando Brooklyn Park Eagan Eden Prairie Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Online General Education & Developmental Education George Alland Brooklyn Park M.A., Boston College M.S., Simmons College B.S., Hunter College Anastasia Martin Brooklyn Park M.S., B.A., B.A., North Dakota State Sabine Meyer, Campus General Education Coordinator Eagan Ph.D., University of Minnesota M.A., University of Kassel Amy Harms Hoad Eagan M.A., Capella University B.A., University of South Dakota Virginia Knox Eagan M.Ed., Capella University B.S., Alcorn State University Kathleen Messerli Eagan M.A., University of Iowa B.A., Iowa State University Elizabeth Otto Eagan M.A., Northern Illinois University B.A., Bradley University Doug VanBuskirk Eagan Ph.D., M.S., B.S., University of Minnesota Seth Berg, General Education Coordinator Eden Prairie M.F.A., Bowling Green State University B.A., University of Toledo Jason Loewen Eden Prairie/Lake Elmo M.A., Arizona State University B.A., St. Johns University Mayura Sharma Eden Prairie M.S., Southern Illinois University B.Arch., L.S. Raheja School of Architecture Sabrina Vogland, Campus General Education Coordinator Lake Elmo M.A., Bethel University B.S., University of Wisconsin - River Falls Erik Ritter Lake Elmo M.F.A., San Francisco Art Institute B.A., South Dakota State University Kevin Langton, Campus General Education Coordinator Mankato M.F.A., B.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato Laura Bartolo Mankato M.F.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato B.A., South Dakota State University Jeanne Gaffney Mankato B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato A.A.S., Austin Community College Debra Bohlman M.A., St. Cloud State University B.A., University of Minnesota Luke Seifert J.D., William Mitchell College of Law B.A., Creighton University Geradine Ball M.A., B.S., Kansas State University Lisa Campeau M.A., Instituto Cultural de Costa Rica B.A., King Alfred’s College Wyll Irvin M.Div., B.A., Asbury College Teresa Kelly M.A., B.A., Agnes Scott College Joni Kuhn M.Ed., City University of Seattle B.A., Western Washington University Staci Hunt Ramsey M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute B.A., University of Virginia Audra Sherwood M.S., B.S., University of Wyoming Jennifer Worley M.A., University of Cincinnati B.A., Ohio State University Admissions Jeff Hagy, National Director of High School Recruitment B.A., St. Cloud State University Paul Kramer, Director of Training and Development M.A., University of St. Thomas B.A., University of Wisconsin Britt Sundberg, Director of Student Recruitment B.S., Montana State University Lori Kaiser, Director of Admissions B.S., Northern State University Randy Rodin, Director of Admissions B.A., St. Cloud State University Mollie Bower, Director of Admissions B.A., University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire Hank Marotske, Director of Admissions B.S.W., University of St. Thomas Jeff Brosz, Director of Admissions B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse David Tan, Director of Admissions B.S., University of Minnesota Jay Buchholz, Director of Admissions B.A., University of Iowa Kathy Clifford, Director of Admissions B.A., Minnesota State University - Mankato Robert Ruprecht, Director of Admissions B.A., St. Cloud State University Jolene Harding Martin, Director of Admissions B.A., St. Cloud State University Kathy Mills, Director of Admissions B.A., University of South Florida Sharon Richardson, Director of Admissions M.S., Troy State University B.S., University of Louisville Paul Smith, Director of Admissions B.S., Barat College A.S., Truman College St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Twin Cities Twin Cities Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato St. Cloud Online Online Online Online R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU 58 CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 FACulTy AND STAFF Administrative Support Jean Duerr, Registrar Diploma, Yakima Business College Susan Roberts, Receptionist B.S., Illinois State University Emily Strande, Administrative Assistant Luke Zakariasen, Administrative Assistant B.A., University of Minnesota – Twin Cities Deborah Glaser, Registrar Katie Loasching, Administrative Assistant B.A., University of Minnesota Erin Moneypenny, Administrative Assistant B.S., Art Institute International A.A.S., Minnesota Community and Technical College Lisa Rymer, Schedule Coordinator Devin Tkachuck, Administrative Assistant Barbara Bryant, Administrative Assistant Liza Flinton, Administrative Assistant Kevin McDermott, Scheduling Coordinator B.A., University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Michele Miller, Administrative Assistant Beth Boegel, Registrar B.A., College of St. Catherine Lynnette Butler, Schedule Coordinator B.B.A., Berkeley College Daniel Hanson, Administrative Assistant B.S., Northwestern College Marianne Michelson, Administrative Assistant Certificate, Dakota County Technical College Vickie Miller, Administrative Assistant A.A.S., Rasmussen College Shae Penkert, Administrative Assistant A.A.S., Rasmussen College Dawn Sellner, Administrative Assistant A.A.S., Rasmussen College Lisa Taylor, Administrative Assistant A.A.S., Rasmussen College Linda Claude, Administrative Assistant Jean Dehler, Registrar B.A., College of St. Benedict Stacy LaVigne, Schedule Coordinator B.S., Southwest State University Cindy Ramler, Administrative Assistant Kate Weber, Administrative Assistant Linda Hoffman, Administrative Assistant A.A., Normandale Community College Joanne M. Larson, Administrative Assistant Rachel Ruch, Registrar B.A., Dickinson College Juliane Arnold, Administrative Assistant A.A., Daytona Beach Community College Kim Hymes, Administrative Assistant Lydia Reed, Administrative Assistant B.B.A., Viterbo University Helpdesk James M. Michael, Regional Systems Administrator Brian Lutgen, Regional Systems Administrator A.A.S., Rasmussen College Jacob Sorem, IT Support Specialist A.A.S., Rasmussen College Michael Dennie, IT Support Specialist A.A.S., Rasmussen College David Flinton, IT Support Specialist Cory Guethling, IT Support Specialist B.S., Concordia University A.A.S., Rasmussen College Aaron Hartwell, IT Support Specialist Eric Christensen, Helpdesk Assistant Library and Learning center Emily O’Connor, Director of Library and Learning Resources M.S., Florida State University B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College Dan Reeves, Reference Librarian M.L.S., Dominican University B.A., Metropolitan State University Brooke Easton, Learning Center Coordinator B.A., William Jewell College Amy Springer, Reference Librarian M.L.I.S., Dominican University B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College Valerie Barbaro, Learning Center Coordinator M.F.A., Emerson College B.A., University of Minnesota Katherine Bessey, Reference Librarian M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin - Green Bay Wendy Roberts, Learning Center Coordinator M.S., University of Wisconsin – Stout B.A.A., University of Minnesota - Duluth Dennis Johnson, Librarian M.A., Dominican University B.A., Winona State University Nicole Wilebski, Learning Center Coordinator M.Ed., B.S., B.S., University of Minnesota A.A., Inver Hills Community College Lisa Spieker, Reference Librarian M.S., B.S., Minnesota State University Mary Englar, Library Assistant M.F.A., Mankato State University B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College Stephanie Krucher, Learning Center Coordinator M.A., Minnesota State University – Mankato B.A., Nyack College Pat Grelson, Reference Librarian B.A., St. Cloud State University Sara Stueve, Reference Librarian M.L.S., University of North Texas B.A., St. Cloud State University Kailyn Helget, Learning Center Coordinator M.S., B.S., St. Cloud State University Jennifer Stoker, Learning Center Coordinator Student Services Stella Coker, Online Bookstore Manager A.A.S., Rasmussen College Jay Gustafson, Scheduler and Academic Advisor B.A., University of South Dakota Jamie Hoag, Student Services Advisor M.A., B.B.A, University of North Dakota Andy LaMere, Scheduler and Academic Advisor B.S., University of Wisconsin – River Falls Shona Ramchandani, Diversity Advisor B.A., Hamline University Angela Craig, Student Services Advisor B.A., Fort Lewis College Jamie Hauer, Student Scheduler M.S., Argosy University B.A., Carroll College Marius Massie, Student Services Advisor B.A., University of Minnesota Jennifer Carroll, Student Services Advisor B.A., Hamline University Bridget Spencer, Student Services Coordinator B.S., Northern State University Elizabeth Vos, Student Services Coordinator A.A.S., Rasmussen College Chris Camolilla, Student Services Coordinator B.A., Salisbury University Jeff Laing, Student Services Coordinator A.S., Full Sail Real World Education Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Online Online Online Online Ocala Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Orlando Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Mankato St. Cloud Online Online St. Cloud Eden Prairie Brooklyn Park Eagan Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Mankato St. Cloud R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU CATALOG & STUDENT HANDBOOK I 2009-2010 59 FACulTy AND STAFF Student Financial Services Debora Murray, National Director of Student Financial Services B.A., University of North Dakota Angie Franke, Manager of Student Financial Services – Region 2 A.A.S., Rasmussen College Steve Yang, Director of Student Financial Services B.A., University of Wisconsin Andrea Ebert, Financial Aid Officer B.S., Concordia University Tammy Hoff, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., Rasmussen College Kyle Ingebrigtson, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., University of Minnesota – Duluth Tina Luke, Financial Planning Coordinator Diploma, Alexandria Technical College Meena Moua, Student Accounts Manager B.S., California State University - Chico Tammy Nowacki, Financial Planning Coordinator Kristen Peterik, Financial Aid Officer B..S., University of Missouri Amanda Suchanek, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., Concordia University Jennifer Thorud, Financial Planning Coordinator Lindsay Adams, Director of Student Financial Services B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Shoua Chao, Student Accounts Manager B.S., Florida Metropolitan University Jothsna Harris, Financial Aid Officer B.A., University of St. Thomas Chayleen Marquis, Financial Aid Officer Shaid Marley, Financial Aid Officer Grace Munyakazi-Umutoni, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., St. Olaf College Ann Quade, Financial Aid Officer B.A., Hamline University Kimberly Wagner, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., University of Minnesota – Duluth Alan Grueneich, Director of Student Financial Services B.S., Minnesota State University – Moorhead Lisa Knox, Financial Aid Officer B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Aleigha Nystuen, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., Bethany Lutheran College Jaime Radcliff, Financial Planner A.A.S., Winona State University Tara Scott, Student Accounts Manager B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Kristine Witt, Financial Aid Officer B.A., College of St. Benedict Joshua Tilander, Director of Student Financial Services A.A.S., Brown College A.A., Inver Hills Community College Kelly Bothwell, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse Connie Kling, Student Accounts Manager B.S., National American University A.S., Minneapolis Business College Kate Lee, Financial Aid Officer B.A., Concordia University Cassie Pershern, Financial Planning Coordinator Jason Rudenick, Financial Planning Coordinator A.A.S., Rasmussen College Carrie Thell, Director of Financial Aid B.A., University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Kim Bruender, Student Accounts Manager A.A.S., Rasmussen College Nichole Engeswick, Financial Planning Coordinator M.B.A., St. Cloud State University B.S., Minnesota State University BrieAnna Lewis, Financial Aid Officer A.A.S., Rasmussen College Nicholl Lien, Financial Planning Coordinator A.A.S., Rasmussen College Michael Manderfield, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., Minnesota State University – Mankato Carole Inderrieden, Director of Student Financial Services St. Cloud Technical College Tina Anderson, Financial Planning Coordinator Jay Comstock, Financial Aid Officer B.A., Concordia College - Moorhead Carol Dockendorf, Financial Aid Officer Rasmussen College Kathy Krebs, Student Accounts Manager Rasmussen College Amy Kuechle, Student Accounts Manager Kate Lauer, Financial Planning Coordinator A.A.S., Rasmussen College Amy Wentland, Student Accounts Manager Jessica Crotty, Director of Student Financial Services B.S., University of Wisconsin - River Falls Janda Brittain, Student Accounts Manager B.A., University of Northern Iowa Ashley Croly, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., B.S., Stetson University Amy Davis, Financial Aid Officer B.A., Purdue University Jennifer Duholm, Financial Aid Officer B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Robert Graham, Financial Aid Officer B.S., North Dakota State University Jennifer Grapentine, Student Accounts Manager Amber Gullickson, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., Concordia University Wade Kesteloot, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., Minnesota State University – Mankato Camille Rosa, Financial Planning Coordinator B.S., University of Phoenix Gabrielle Sellas, Financial Planning Coordinator B.A., University of Central Florida Nate Umhoefer, Financial Planning Coordinator B..S., University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh Lucie Van Horn, Financial Aid Planner A.A., Kaufmaennische Berufsschule-Germany John Wiberg, Financial Aid Officer B.A., Northwestern College Oana Zayic, Financial Aid Officer Ph.D., M.A., Lucian Blaga University B.A., Vasile Goldis Western University career Services Tami Hanson, National Director of Career Services B.A., St. Norbert College Amy Rice, Career Services Advisor B.A., St. Norbert College Tina Thompson, Career Services Advisor B.S., University of Minnesota Kelsey Kennedy, Career Services Advisor B.S., Northern Michigan University Christina Forsythe, Career Services Advisor B.S., Minnesota State University Amy Ites, Career Services Advisor Certificate, Rasmussen College Katie Mons, Career Services Advisor B.S., Minnesota State University - Mankato Summer Elgin, Career Services Advisor B.S., Mount Mercy College Mankato Mankato St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud St. Cloud Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Online Twin Cities Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Brooklyn Park Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eagan Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato Mankato Mankato Twin Cities Brooklyn Park Eagan Eden Prairie Lake Elmo Mankato Mankato St. Cloud R A S M U S S E N CO L L E G E I M I N N E S O T A I www.RASMUSSEN.EDU FLOR I D A LOC ATI ON S M I N N ES OTA L O C AT IO N S Fort Myers Campus 9160 Forum Corporate Parkway, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905-7805 239-477-2100 Ocala Campus 2221 SW 19th Avenue Road Ocala, FL 34471-7751 352-629-1941 Pasco County Campus 2127 Grand Boulevard Holiday, FL 34690-4554 727-942-0069 I LLI N OI S LOC ATI ON S Aurora Campus 2363 Sequoia Drive, Suite 131 Aurora, IL 60506 630-888-3500 Rockford Campus 6000 East State Street, Fourth Floor Rockford, IL 61108-2513 815-316-4800 Romeoville/Joliet Campus 1400 West Normantown Road Romeoville, IL 60446 866-967-7045 R A S M U S S EN ON LI N E Brooklyn Park Campus 8301 93rd Avenue North Brooklyn Park, MN 55445-1512 763-493-4500 Eagan Campus 3500 Federal Drive Eagan, MN 55122-1346 651-687-9000 Eden Prairie Campus 7905 Golden Triangle Drive, Suite 100 Eden Prairie, MN 55344-7220 952-545-2000 Lake Elmo/Woodbury Campus 8565 Eagle Point Circle Lake Elmo, MN 55042-8637 651-259-6600 Mankato Campus 130 Saint Andrews Drive Mankato, MN 56001 507-625-6556 St. Cloud Campus 226 Park Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301-3713 320-251-5600 N OR TH D A KOTA L O C AT IO N S www.rasmussen.edu 888-5-RASMUSSEN Bismarck Campus 1701 East Century Avenue Bismarck, ND 58503-0658 701-530-9600 Fargo/Moorhead Campus Fargo Site 4012 19th Avenue SW Fargo, ND 58103-7196 701-277-3889 Moorhead Site 1250 29th Avenue South Moorhead, MN 56560 218-304-6200 W I S C ON S I N L O C AT IO N RASMUSSEN COLLEGE | www.Rasmussen.edu © 2009 Rasmussen College, Inc. Green Bay Campus 904 South Taylor Street, Suite 100 Green Bay, WI 54303-2349 920-593-8400 Wausau Campus 1101 Westwood Drive Wausau, WI 54401 1-888-5-RASMUSSEN